Author Topic: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection  (Read 9195 times)

Owen Reich

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I've been collecting these for years and know a fair amount about training and defoliation, but am wondering who else collects them, when, and what aftercare is given.  There seems to be a window where they don't like to be dug up.  Anyone?  I collected one a in early fall that was a 30' tall vine.  Cut to 18" and potted.  In Spring it didn't leaf out.  I waited til May, then hurled plant off hill.  Mid-arc, I saw some white roots......  :o. Grabbed on first bounce and replanted.  Two weeks later it leafed out.  Will post a current pic soon.  I'm guessing it needed time to pop adventitious buds.

Anyone defoliating in summer to collect?
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2013, 12:35 PM »
 :wwo
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2013, 02:27 PM »
Ok, taking photos now.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2013, 02:38 PM »
One I'm growing over a rock using the "milk jug" method. 
Young collected one.
  My favorite. 
At the new planting angle.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2013, 02:43 PM »
One great way to make thick trunks is to let them eat your house.  This is Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Loweii"
 

andy graham

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2013, 03:38 PM »
I see the picture but it doesn't tell me anything. What is the "milk jug method"?
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2013, 06:00 PM »
Ok, you take a plastic, clear milk jug and remove top and part of handle depending on height of final tree.  Punch liberal amount of holes in the bottom and a few in the sides.  I used "lace stone" imported from Arizona via Brussel's Bonsai as the stone for a root-over-rock-design.  Muck aka Keto Tsuchi was used to keep the roots close to the rock then the whole thing was wrapped in thin felt to keep the roots only growing out the bottom of the "felt burrito".  Would have taken photos but process is super messy.  The wrapped up rock/plant/felt roll was placed in the middle of the jug and the rest of the jug was filled with akadama (soft).  Plant watered in with special attention paid to soaking the center mass for the first two weeks.  After week 1 I had roots coming out the bottom and visible roots on the sides week 2.  After one year (next Spring), I'll cut half the milk jug off and remove any soil and muck from the roots on the top half.  Year two I'll check as I go as to depth I can expose.  I'll either repot into a bonsai container or plant high in a terra cotta pot to thicken trunks / roots for another year or two. 

This is a lot cheaper and easier for creating root-over-rock designs as building boxes isn't my thing.  Possible, but I'm going to create lots of them next year of multiple species.  The idea came from Matsubonsai's pine and juniper neagari projects using two-liter bottles.  The clear sided container is definitely helpful.
 

andy graham

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2013, 08:14 AM »
Why "soft" akadama? You specified it so I'm assuming there is a particular reason.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2013, 10:17 AM »
Owen, do you remove the felt too after yr 1?  I have one ROR Trident in the ground.  But I'd like to give this method a try too.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2013, 07:33 PM »
Why "soft" akadama? You specified it so I'm assuming there is a particular reason.

I'm going to use this as an exercise and guess that it's because of soft akadama's capability for holding water and still maintaining air spaces.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2013, 09:42 PM »
I use soft akadama because its a deciduous plant and it will hold water a bit longer when heated through the clear jug.  I'll cut off the felt to the level of mix I remove (so half year one).  I suppose all the felt could come off after year one. 
 

rxa

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2013, 06:58 AM »
I have have a soft spot for both the Virginia Creeper and the Boston Ivy. Great colour (as good as an Acer some years) and impressive vigour. I haven't dug one up yet though.

Only defoliated once for health rather than development, I had an attack of the dreaded weevil - but now back in a better state of well-being I should give it a shot maybe. It took a long time for the leaves to turn to green this year.
 

augustine

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2013, 10:20 AM »
Owen,

I love vines and grow porcelainberry (the variegated cultivated type), bittersweet (collected in winter) and VA Creeper.

I collected a couple in mid-Autumn. The only reason I dug them at that time was that I happened to find them and had time to play. Both were trunks without foliage. I can't remember precisely when they started growing the next season but it was much later than I had expected and was doubting survival.

The best of the 2 trunks grew foliage from under the surface of the soil only and I don't think there's enough trunk to raise it. Have to see what happens. I have them in large plastic containers under some shrubs and they are happy.

I think they are beautiful plants and autumn color is great. I keep looking for a spectacular stump.

Best to all,

Augustine
central MD 7a
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2013, 11:17 AM »
Rxa, the big one is nice  ;D.  I've been on a bit if a a vine kick for the last two years.  Porcelain berry is another nice one but nobody wants to sell / trade theirs.  Been spotting VA creeper in rock pockets on the interstate lately.....if one were theoretically collected mid-summer, results will be posted later. 
 

coh

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Re: Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Collection
« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2013, 02:30 PM »
Rxa, the big one is nice  ;D.  I've been on a bit if a a vine kick for the last two years.  Porcelain berry is another nice one but nobody wants to sell / trade theirs.  Been spotting VA creeper in rock pockets on the interstate lately.....if one were theoretically collected mid-summer, results will be posted later. 

I've got a pretty large porcelain berry vine growing on a fence...might be willing to part with it if someone wanted to dig it up. It's been in the ground at least 6 or 7 years, multi-trunked with a pretty large base though the individual trunks aren't very large. Let me know next time you're in the Rochester area...I can send a photo if you think you might be interested.

Chris