Author Topic: Trident maple  (Read 6357 times)

boon

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Trident maple
« on: July 23, 2009, 12:50 AM »
This trident  maple was trained from a stump 8 years ago.  There were no major branches. They were just small twigs.  i wired them when they were small. Too bad, I do not have the pic when it was a stump. 

It is time to do second defoliate and wire(aluminum).

it took me 4 hour to finish.  I kept the leave on the lower branch.  It is a little small.  I still need it to grow thicker.

 

boon

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2009, 12:52 AM »
the new cut (wound) was treated.  it healed over nicely.  I still have to work on the old wound. 
This show you that you need to put cut paste on the cut to make it heal.  this is the proof.
Boon
 

Jeff Lahr

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2009, 01:37 AM »
What a great tree with only eight years development. Are the roots grafted?
 

ken duncan

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2009, 06:27 AM »
Hi Boon,
Very nice Trident, Thank You for posting it.
Ken
 

boon

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2009, 03:06 AM »
hi Jeff,
no the roots are the same way since i worked on it.

Ken, thanks,
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2009, 01:45 PM »
Boon,

Glad to see you here.  Awesome tree, thanks for sharing.  How often/when do you defoliate this one?  How often is it wired/re-wired?
 

boon

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2009, 09:12 PM »
Boon,

Glad to see you here.  Awesome tree, thanks for sharing.  How often/when do you defoliate this one?  How often is it wired/re-wired?

Hi John,
this year, i will do only twice.  usually i do it 3 times.  at this point, it is wired as needed.  i wired after i defoliated it. it is not yet finished.  we still develop more twigs.
thanks,
Boon
 

akeppler

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2009, 09:17 PM »
Very beautiful tree Boon. I think this classical style for a trident is still my favorite form for this species. Wish mine had a nebari like that.
 

boon

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2009, 10:17 AM »
hi Al,
thanks,
root graft is easy to do and it is one of the best wayto fix nebari of maple.
 

akeppler

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2009, 01:46 AM »
Thanks Boon, an address change may be in the works for me soon. I will hopefully be relocating to the Santa Cruz area by Fall of next year. That will make the Boon experience possible for me and then we can get to work grafting a set of legs onto my tree.
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2009, 11:44 AM »
Can someone explain to me the difference between classical style versus more natural style for deciduous trees?  I'm not looking to get into a big debate on which is "better" bonsai, but curious as to how branches are developed for each style.

My sense is that classical style creates tiers of branches that are more horizontal at each level of the tree.  For the more natural style, the beginning of each branch off the trunk has initial movement that is more vertical in nature.  The lower branches then come back down into a more horizontal plane, and as you go up the tree, the branches tend to be more vertical.

Again, I'm not trying to start an argument as to which is better.  I've got a trident stump that grew a ton of new branches all over the trunk this year, and I'm trying to figure out which way I want to go on wiring the initial movement on the branches.

Thanks - and really nice tree Boon!  I met you back in March at the NVBS repotting workshop and really learned a lot from you in just those few hours (I was the younger guy that brought in the kishu shimpaku).
 

ken duncan

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2009, 12:47 PM »
mcpesq817,
I think that You have the right idea about the difference between the two.
To me the classical bonsai style for a trident is a Pine tree shape. A natural style tree to me is one that has a real natural look to it, where the branches are not all wired down, some may be growing more upright. I think that using the clip and grow method instead of wiring, gives a more natural look. I have found that is not easy to pull off but when it is done well it makes a Bonsai that looks like a real tree.
Ken   
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2009, 04:08 PM »
Thanks Ken, that's what I was thinking too.  I'll try out the natural style and see how it goes.  If I don't like it, at least it's not a pine so I can cut the branches off and start all over.
 

noissee

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2009, 05:53 PM »
Thanks Ken, that's what I was thinking too.  I'll try out the natural style and see how it goes.  If I don't like it, at least it's not a pine so I can cut the branches off and start all over.

Thats a great attitude to have when dealing with bonsai, IMO.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Trident maple
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2009, 11:15 PM »
Ken,
look at the really good classical deciduous trees in Japan, in Kokufu books, they don't look like pines at all. However, they are very stylized to give an impression of a tree, whereas the "naturalistic" (Aja European) style trees are designed to look just like a  photographic image of a tree, less stylized. If I had to judge classically styled (akaJapanese) trees by most you see in the US I wouldn't like them much either- most don't have a high degree of ramification and few have seen much wire.

John