Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Trident Maple Soil  (Read 2209 times)
BonsaiEngineer1493
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 224
USDA Hardiness: 6B



« on: January 24, 2013, 02:36 PM »

Hey guys,

Just planning ahead  for spring. I want to repot my trident maple, but I did not purchase any soil yet. Which soil do you recommend?

Thanks,
Nick
Logged

Don Dunn
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 191



« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2013, 01:15 AM »

No one ever replied to poor Nick, I would also like to know what others are using for Trident.
Logged

MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
*****
Posts: 1370
USDA Hardiness: 6b



WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2013, 08:20 AM »

Akadama, pumice, lava.
Logged

J

BonsaiEngineer1493
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 224
USDA Hardiness: 6B



« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2013, 03:27 PM »

is that a soil mix or either one?
Logged

Charles Willis
Legit New User
*
Posts: 37
USDA Hardiness: 6a



« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2013, 03:51 PM »

It's an even mix of those three components. You could also use even parts Turface, pine bark, and granite grit.
Logged

Don Dunn
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 191



« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2013, 04:16 PM »

Is redwood bark/small orchid bark  ok instead of the pine bark? And is this ok for Japanese Maples as well?
Logged

AlexV
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 128

« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2013, 08:00 PM »

Many people on this forum take the Akadama/Pummice/Lava approach as it is the soil Boon and many Japanese trained professionals prefer.  It often causes big arguments, so many of the more veteran posters won't say anything because it has been hashed out so many times and everyone has basically agreed to disagree.  If you do a search you will find several articles on this forum on bonsai soil, and many discussions elsewhere.

I do not recommend redwood bark or small orchid bark.  I would find a local bonsai club, which will probably hold workshops that will help you repot your tree.  It isn't just the soil you use, many other factors go into re-potting, and those are best taught in person or Boon sells some really good videos on it.

I suggest you do some research and make up your mind based on what is available to you.

Here are some places to start:

http://bonsaistudygroup.com/fruiting-and-flowering-bonsai-discussion/bad-soil-bad-root/

http://bonsaistudygroup.com/profiles-and-interviews/interview-with-boon-manakitivipart-%28part-5-boon-on-soil%29/

Cheers,
Alex
Logged

Don Dunn
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 191



« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2013, 08:41 PM »

Thank you Alex
 I did not mean to pick on a sore spot for some folks. I'll check out these links and I'll pick a soil blend and and try it for a couple of years. I just want to learn things that are correct and not find out down the road I was way off.
Appreciate your reply.
Don
Logged

Adair M
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 484
USDA Hardiness: 7B

« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2013, 10:16 PM »

I just returned from an Intensive with Boon.  We used the "Boon Mix" of akadama, lava, and pumice on everything we potted.  That's the mix Boon likes, but it's not the only mix that "works".  If those materials aren't available to you, use something else that is.

Akadama is a fired volcanic clay from Japan.  It will hold a little water to slow release to the roots as they need it.  But it also allows roots to have good exposure to oxygen. It promotes rapid root growth.   It does bread down over time as the root system grows.  So, you have to repot.

Pumice doesn't break down, a help promote good drainage.

Lava is light, and has an open structure, again promoting exposure to oxygen for rapid root growth.

All the above make for a fast draining soil that will help keep your roots from developing root rot from sitting in too wet conditions.

If you live in a hot climate, you may have to water often.  Maybe more than once a day.  That's the tradeoff.  Using a totally inorganic soil requires organic fertilizer and attention to watering.  Your reward for that is awesome nebari and excellent health of the tree.

Many commercial operations add organic material to their soil mixes because it is "safer" for them.  It will hold more water, so they are less likely to lose material due to lack of water.  It's also less expensive.  Their tradeoff is the plant is not as healthy AS IT COULD BE.  They also tend to use the fertilizer salts.  Their purpose is to keep the tree alive until it is sold, not to develop finished bonsai.

There are certainly exceptions to the above paragraph.  Just know that one of the first things that needs to be done when you aquire a bonsai, or bonsai material, is to evaluate the soil it is in.  If the soil needs to be improved, do so at the earliest appropriate time.
Logged

Don Dunn
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 191



« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2013, 11:59 PM »

Adair
 I want the best for my trees It would be a crime to loose one that I had worked on for a long time because of poor drainage. Healthy trees would make me a happy man.
Logged

AlexV
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 128

« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2013, 10:31 AM »

If I could go back and give myself one piece of advice about bonsai soil, it would be to make sure that whatever I was using drained out of the pot rapidly when watered.  Meaning, when you put the hose on it and fill the pot, the soil doesn't hold water, it just runs right out the bottom of the pot.  Some trees like more water, some less, but very very few trees like to have their roots in standing water.

I think everyone kills a few trees (or more than a few in my case) when they first get into bonsai, but making sure you have soil that drains will go a long ways towards helping out your trees.  Good luck, and let us know what you decide on.

Cheers,
Alex
Logged

kitman34
Poster
*
Posts: 1
USDA Hardiness: 5A

« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2013, 03:30 PM »

Tagging along with soil mix for Maple.

I live in Chicago which is Zone 5B and I have a JM (Bloodgood). Can i use Turface MVP, lava rock and pine park? What ratio should I use? 1:1 of each materials?

Thanks
Logged

Sulaiman
Legit New User
*
Posts: 8

« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2013, 08:12 AM »

Diatomite, stone/grit and pine bark.
or 30-40% potting soil with 60-70% stone/grit/lava rock/turface will do. Leave the other things to professionals first learn to water your trees. I myself prefer a bit of organic material. Most important thing is drainage and know what type and sizes of trees.

Anyways welcome to the highest form of horticulture. Grin
Logged

bigDave
Jr. Forum Member
**
Posts: 82



« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2013, 10:33 AM »

Tagging along with soil mix for Maple.

I live in Chicago which is Zone 5B and I have a JM (Bloodgood). Can i use Turface MVP, lava rock and pine park? What ratio should I use? 1:1 of each materials?

Thanks
HAVE SETTLED ON ABOUT 80% AGGREGATES AND 20 OF ORGANICS, WORKS GOOD...NO MORE EXPERIMENTING FOR ME !

OPPs sorry about the caps
Take care Kitman
Logged

Pages: [1]
Print
 
Jump to: