Author Topic: seuji pics  (Read 4839 times)

Joshua Hanzman

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Re: Re: seuji pics
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2013, 10:47 PM »
When I pop this out in spring, which I'll do if it puts out good growth, I'll take pictures of the nebari and go from there...

 thanks both of you, I appreciate sound advise like this. Augustine I'm not sure if I get the file remark, I can be quite slow when it comes to understanding written conversation :-\

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augustine

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Re: seuji pics
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2013, 01:19 PM »
Sorry a typo.

I meant to write "tile." You don't have to use a tile for the roots when growing in a container. Use a shallow container with some room for the roots to grow. Not too large though. 
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re: Re: seuji pics
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2013, 11:42 PM »
"Not too large", what is your reasoning behind this? If I wanna simulate field growing, should I not put it in as large a container as I can find?

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John Kirby

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Re: seuji pics
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2013, 07:45 AM »
The scientific method has been applied by many to propagating plants by cutting or air layering. Including timing, type of material (green or hardwood cuttings), rooting hormone type and dosage, etc. The 'bible' for temperate and some tropical plants is Mike Dirr's  'Manual for Woody Plant Propagation'. It is exhaustive, complete with references, yet very, very user friendly.

Personally, I use rooting hormone on everything (different strengths for different species), set most cuttings in straight, coarse perlite, and cover the surface completely with sphagnum. We place ours under benches to protect from wind drying them out. I don't have my mister set up , but that under bench humidity in our set up works fine. One exception for perlite for us are satsuki azaleas, we root those directly in kanuma.

I think if you just need an occasional plant, you can guess and just about anything. If you need high reliability, like for very valuable cuttings or for mass production, you need highly predictable and reliable results. Elms tend to be easy, but they can surprise you if you aren't careful, especially in warm and dry climates.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Re: seuji pics
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2013, 08:14 AM »
"Not too large", what is your reasoning behind this? If I wanna simulate field growing, should I not put it in as large a container as I can find?

http://www.evergreengardenworks.com/earthpot.htm

That link explains it better than I could.
 

bwaynef

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Re: seuji pics
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2015, 01:33 PM »
So, how's this one turned out?