Author Topic: Red Maple  (Read 5283 times)

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Red Maple
« on: November 15, 2014, 01:51 PM »
It arrived last week from Florida. Jay Wilson was selling his entire collection, luckily I was able to snatch this red maple. I sparked my interest was a red maple from the Brooklyn botanical garden collection. I was so fascinated with by its natural appearance. I browsing around looking for answers to why are red maples not widely practiced on in the US -they are our native trees. Usually the answers are that they are difficult to deal with and trident and Japanese maples simply over shadow red maples. It would be interesting to hear what you guys think. Anyways, here are the pictures.

Nick

P.S Judy helped me pick this one out
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2014, 01:58 PM »
Here is the red maple that sparked my interest. These are the winter and fall pictures. It was recently pruned. Luckily lots of new buds showed up.
 

Jason E

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2014, 03:51 PM »
Don't have much to add, but yours looks like a nice tree.

thanks for sharing.

 

J.Kent

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2014, 05:01 PM »
Yours looks much nicer (potentially) than the BBG tree.

The difficulty with Acer rubrum is the long internodes they tend to get if you don't stay on top of them during the growing season.  They require constant pinching and pruning.  The leaves have long petioles, also, which means they do best as a fairly large tree. 
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2014, 06:14 PM »
Are there still trees available in the FL collection?
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2014, 06:21 PM »
Owen, you should contact Jay Wilson. I believe he has an account here, but he is more active on bnut. His username is his name.
 

fredman

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2014, 03:22 AM »
WoW I just love a natural looking tree.  Really beautiful examples. Thanks for sharing ;D
 

Judy

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2014, 07:25 AM »
Yup, this one is nice, love the hollow on the low trunk.  Will be fun to watch this one.  Look for a nice oval for it this winter maybe.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2014, 09:43 AM »
J.Kent, I can't believe you said that. Thank you, it is something to really look forward to.

fredman, you welcome. I'm a sucker for natural looking trees. Walter Pall always impresses me.

Judy, you really made me happy with this one. I have no experience with selecting pots. I never had an opportunity. However, I did pruchase mica pots and colander, but nothing upscale.
 

pjkatich

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2014, 04:55 PM »
You got yourself a great tree.

I have been growing red maple as bonsai for twenty years and have had a lot of fun with them.  There is a local variety that grows in my area of Florida that I have identified as Acer rubrum 'trilobum'.  This variety has smaller leaves and shorter inter-nodes than the normal varieties of red maple.

Here is one of my red maples with and with-out leaves.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Regards,
Paul

[attachment deleted by admin]
 

Bonsai Study Group Admin

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2014, 06:51 PM »
Please remove single quotes from file names. This is a known issue that we're working to resolve.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2014, 07:09 PM »
Thanks paul! At bbg we have like 3-4 red maples. All of them have great character and unique in their own way. I do not know their stories -I should probably find out. As I mentioned before, I was only familiar with Red maples growing in the north until Jay started selling his trees. I'll compare/contrasts mine with the bbg trees. My main concern is getting it through the winter. Its currently outside with protection from wind. I do not have any questions at the moment, but if you have some advice on winter protection for my climate feel free to throw that in. In addition, I'm also wondering if mine can possibly be Acer rubrum "trilobum" Unfortunately, I was not able to see your tree. I'm excited to take a look!
« Last Edit: November 16, 2014, 07:17 PM by BonsaiEngineer1493 »
 

pjkatich

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2014, 08:11 PM »
Let's try this one again.

The third photo is what the leaves of this variety of maple look like.

I expect the tree will require protection during the winter. 

Red maples can survive sub-freezing temperatures for short periods.  But I would expect anything longer than a few days would be pushing it.

Regards,
Paul
 

0soyoung

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2014, 02:09 AM »

Red maples can survive sub-freezing temperatures for short periods.  But I would expect anything longer than a few days would be pushing it.


Actually, acer rubrum is a very cold hardy tree. Its natural range extends from FL north into Canada where freezing temperatures occur for extented periods of time and get as low as -40!

 

J.Kent

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2014, 09:22 AM »
Yes, red maples are one of the most widely distributed deciduous trees in eastern North America.

However, individual trees (and especially var. trilobum) from Florida have genetically adapted to Florida temperatures, and it will take several cycles to re-adapt them to the cold north.  I'd suggest a cold greenhouse or unheated garage for your tree.  It is too nice to take risks with.