Author Topic: Red Maple  (Read 2622 times)

bwaynef

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Red Maple
« on: August 09, 2010, 03:21 PM »
Acer rubrum

This was collected last spring ('09).  I ended up trimming it in the fall, and I've trimmed it and fed it heavily since this spring.  I found that Japanese Beetles seemed to like this one, and the leaves scorched (probably due to a watering snafu) so I defoliated to see what the new crop of leaves would turn into.

I'm torn on chopping this one lower and creating a sumo or creating a taller tree.


The nebari touches the sides of the pots almost all the way around.  Its just buried for now.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2010, 03:28 PM »
Fyi:  the chop you see is a "get-it-out-of-the-woods" chop.  I figure I'd make the determination on where to chop later.  Later is creeping up on me.
 

seth ellwood

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2010, 10:26 PM »
Are you sure it is a (acer ruburm )red maple and not a chalkbark (Acer leucoderme)?I think a sumo would best suit what this trees full potential will be and if you put it in to a cement mixing tub next year and let that lowest front branch grow for a few years  to become the new apex it will look great.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2010, 08:54 AM »
Are you sure it is a (acer ruburm )red maple and not a chalkbark (Acer leucoderme)?

Tree ID has never been my strong suit, but from what I've seen, the leaves look more like rubrum than leucoderme.  Is your question based on the markings of the bark?

Quote
I think a sumo would best suit what this trees full potential will be and if you put it in to a cement mixing tub next year and let that lowest front branch grow for a few years  to become the new apex it will look great.

Thanks for the input.  As yet, I'm undecided about where to chop the tree.  Regardless, I believe the branch you envision as the apex certainly has a future.  I like the suggestion of the cement mixing tub though.  I'll have to look into that.
 

seth ellwood

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2010, 10:05 PM »
If it was collected from the woods it is more than likely leucoderme they are native and more prolific in this state .Also looking at the redish color to the stem and the leaf it appears to be leucoderme as well. The sun scourch is comon if it is in full sun as these are mainly understory trees untill the get to full  height I keep mine in partial shade during the heat of the day . John came to my farm a few years ago and we collected 20 or so .I also have one I have been working for a year now it has a 7" trunk and about a 9" nebari
« Last Edit: August 10, 2010, 10:09 PM by seth ellwood »
 

bwaynef

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2010, 10:18 PM »
Other than partial shade, are there any differences in how they prefer to be cared for.
 

Zach Smith

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2010, 08:51 AM »
I think I'd plant this one in the ground for more rapid thickening of whatever new leader you select.  You've got a great base to work from.  Be on guard for rot with this species.  The trunk chop will look fine for a year or two, then next thing you know you'll get dieback down the trunk.  This is usually accompanied by neat-looking mushrooms that sprout near the base.  They look neat, but represent what the rotting fungus has already done (the mushrooms meaning the fungus has reached the reproduction stage after feasting on your tree).

Good luck with this one, Wayne!

Zach
 

seth ellwood

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Re: Red Maple
« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2010, 10:33 PM »
Other than partial shade, are there any differences in how they prefer to be cared for.
I have given mine iornite earily and the leaves are a very dark green . Mine backbudded from the trunk all over so I have many branches to choose from .Keep relatively moist and fertilize every other week with liquid fert.Like zack said in the ground or cement mixing tub for rapid development.here is mine shortly after collection and after leaf out it has come full circle now. I need to get updated pics of my trees to update the threads I have created for these.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2010, 10:40 PM by seth ellwood »