Author Topic: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.  (Read 4714 times)

Padawan

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Hi everyone! I'm new to this forum, and looking for advice on the care of my Japanese Maple.

My Red leafed Japanese Maple tree (deshojo) recently became infested with Aphids and thrips. The systemic insecticide (active ingredient: imidacloprid) I have can be applied by leaf or soil. Not knowing how delicate the leaves of this tree were, I just came in from misting it downwind with a diluted solution of about 60% of the recommended dosage. I'm pretty disappointed in myself for not doing more research before I acted. I feel like went into battle blindfolded, as this is my first Japanese Maple. Does anyone here have any experience with this sort of thing and/or advice? Will my tree be okay, or did I just toast it? Perhaps a should to cry on if I am greeted by deadwood in the morning?
 

augustine

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2013, 09:13 AM »
I've used Imadocloprid as a systemic, in granular form, on everything except Chinese elms. (Chinese elms are not supposed to like systemic. )

Anyway, my guess is that your maple will be ok. 

Maples should never be sprayed with an oil solution.

Best,

Augustine
MD 7a
 

0soyoung

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2013, 01:07 PM »
I have maples in my landscape and maples in pots and maples next door. I've never seen an aphid or thrips problem on any of them, whereas, aphids always appear on roses, photinia, and even junipers I have. Regardless, aphids are easily dealt with by a jet of water from a hose (wash the leaves when you water as a cure/preventive) or by 'squishing' them with your index finger and thumb. It doesn't seem that thrips would be particularly different, though I've never had troubles because of them.

I have a shin deshojo in my collection of 20-some japanese maples. It typically gets wind burned in the early spring but pops new leaves in another 4 to 6 weeks. Are you sure you don't really have a problem with wind burn? Japanese maples will take full sun, but they are easily dessicated by winds/breezes (say 20 mph plus, but lower the hotter the air). Leaves wither from the outside of the canopy on the side the wind comes from but are okay on the lee side.
 

augustine

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2013, 10:25 AM »
Padawan,

I have also used permethrin on everything. Kills aphids well and has not hurt any of my plants.

I've never had aphids on my Japanese maples either but they show up early, in large numbers, on a few other species. Spraying is done in the evening to prevent harm to the bees.

Best,

Augustine
central MD 7a
 

Chrisl

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2013, 11:05 AM »
For you all who uses the granular Imidacloprid, how much do you put on top of the soil?  I've just been guessing when I've had to use it.
 

Dirk

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2013, 12:22 AM »
Hi all,

I have something to say about the use of Imacloprid and other neonicotinoide (I hope this is also the English description for this group of pesticides).
Many of the working substances in this group of pesticides are already banned in EU. They are responsible for dead of bees. This is a great problem world wide. Imacloprid is one of the banned substances. And I am happy it is!! No matter how precious our trees are, and how good and fast Imacloprid and such work, we so should consider the environment. Imacloprid kills much more then the bugs on our trees. I really think there are other substances and methods to get rid of bug that eat our trees!
Take care!
 

Chrisl

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2013, 10:39 AM »
For you all who uses the granular Imidacloprid, how much do you put on top of the soil?  I've just been guessing when I've had to use it.

Anyone?
 

augustine

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2013, 11:06 AM »
Chrisl,

I use a Bonide product and there were directions for various sized containers. Google Bonide's website and find the Systemic Insecticide granules. You'll be able to pull up the label and directions. However check the strength of your granules compared to Bonide's and adjust accordingly.

I found that I used many pounds last year and switched to a Bayer liquid which is poured on the soil "Tree and Shrub?" It's a higher concentration and is used once per year. If it works just as well it is considerably less expensive. Also, this particular product was recommended by a professional bonsai grower and artist. Used the last week in May and so far so good.

I spray permethrin, if needed, and neem oil solution for mites, but never when bees are active.

Best to all,

Augustine
central MD 7a
 

Dirk

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2013, 12:33 PM »
From Wikipedia:

In agriculture, permethrin is mainly used on cotton, wheat, maize, and alfalfa crops. Its use is controversial because, as a broad-spectrum chemical, it kills indiscriminately; as well as the intended pests, it can harm beneficial insects including honey
bees, and aquatic life.[4]

Also banned in  EU, and that is not without a reason!

Seems no one cares?

I'm not using these on my bonsai, no matte how old and costly.
I think no one should.
 

Dirk

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2013, 12:35 PM »
I think every one should consider the consequences of the stuff you're using to protect trees from bugs.
 

coh

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2013, 12:59 PM »
Dirk,

I appreciate what you're saying. However...I don't think using imidaclopromid on my bonsai collection is going to have a significant impact on the ecosystem. In particular...the potential effect on honeybees (I don't know if the link has been proven?) is due to the chemical getting into the pollen and nectar...foraging bees take this back to their hive. My bonsai pines produce little or no pollen or nectar. I would not use the stuff on landscape plants.

On that note, here in NY many areas are using chemical treatments, including imidaclopromid, to try to save trees from the emerald ash borer. Use of these chemicals on that kind of scale could have significant impacts on the environment. The grand experiment continues...

Chris
 

0soyoung

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2013, 01:24 PM »
I think every one should consider the consequences of the stuff you're using to protect trees from bugs.


I agree, Dirk.

There is a statement in this thread that some pesticide 'even works on aphids'. Nuclear bombs undoubtedly do too. There is no need to use chemical agents for such minor pests, so why use them? Laziness, maybe (i.e., 'why should I trouble myself when I can just nuke it')?
 

Dirk

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2013, 04:18 PM »
Dirk,

I appreciate what you're saying. However...I don't think using imacloprid on my bonsai collection is going to have a significant impact on the ecosystem.

Chris,

I agree with you about the scale we use these substances compared to what is used in agriculture.
Corn for instance, used to be yellow. Now it's kind of orange because of a layer of imacloprid: Before sawing its already coated with a lifetime supply! This does never get out of the environment anymore, never breaks down.
Sometimes you even find imacloprid in regular potting soils: Killing all microscopic life in it.

True, it's very effective. That why it is used so much. And it keeps our bonsai trees free from nasty bugs.
But you can't take a stand against the widely spread use of it in agriculture, and say "Its fine if I use it, cause I use only a little bit".

Your very next question would be what I use?
Well, I haven't found a good alternative yet. I use Natria from Bayer, which has natural ingredients, that do break down in a short time. But NOT as effective as the nasty stuff.
But I'm searching!!!!

Dirk
 

Chrisl

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Re: Red Leaf Japanese Maple Imidacloprid sprayed on leaves/tree.
« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2013, 01:28 PM »
Chrisl,

I use a Bonide product and there were directions for various sized containers. Google Bonide's website and find the Systemic Insecticide granules. You'll be able to pull up the label and directions. However check the strength of your granules compared to Bonide's and adjust accordingly.

I found that I used many pounds last year and switched to a Bayer liquid which is poured on the soil "Tree and Shrub?" It's a higher concentration and is used once per year. If it works just as well it is considerably less expensive. Also, this particular product was recommended by a professional bonsai grower and artist. Used the last week in May and so far so good.

I spray permethrin, if needed, and neem oil solution for mites, but never when bees are active.

Best to all,

Augustine
central MD 7a

Thank You Augustine!  That helped a lot!

Chris