Author Topic: quercus suber  (Read 10499 times)

Judy

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quercus suber
« on: October 05, 2013, 09:32 AM »
Ok, so I'm one of the guilty LURKERS here ;D... and I have appreciated all the things I've learned while doing so.
I will try to be more involved ::)

Here is my cork bark oak.  I picked this up from Bob Potts when he was thru the area this past spring.  I immediately chopped most of the rootball and tap roots off and put it in a oversized pot for this year.  It must have been the right timing for the tree, as it took right off.  It put on so much growth, that it's been wired 3 times so far. 

My inspiration for this tree was the Tucker oak that is on display at the Weyerhaeuser exhibit. That tree is amazing.  Although this tree will never have the deadwood, and intricate foldings,  looking at it brings the Tucker oak to my mind.  I was lucky enough to have Owen's help getting it started in this direction while he was through town. 
I hope to be able to keep this in the cold greenhouse this winter, but am wondering if anyone has had problems keeping them through a winter in a similar climate.  Now that I'm starting to like this one, I may do better protection to keep it from an freezes...
A quick progression, and a photo of the Tucker.
 

bwaynef

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2013, 10:31 AM »
Wow!  Thank you for sharing the picture of the Tucker Oak.  That tree is fantastic!

I like your tree.  There's good movement and the foliage seems to be shaping up to build a very believable crown.  I don't have any experience with that species so I can't offer any advice.  Its just praise from me this time!
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re: Re: quercus suber
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2013, 02:10 PM »
That really is amazing, I love quercus, and there are tons around me, I like mulberry for the same reason, similar leaves and bark... but I've heard that horticulturally they are difficult, do you find them that much more of a challenge than other common species? What strategies do you take differently for them than other species?

Looking at the difference between third and fourth pictures,I can see that the trunk has thickened considerably despite small pot culture, are they similar to fagus in that respect?

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Judy

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2013, 02:20 PM »
Hi Joshua,
I have not had any problems with this at all, now granted it's my first year with my first one, but it's outpacing almost everything else I have.  Very easy care, and easy to shape if you keep at it when it's limber.  The worst problem is you have to check it so often for the wire cutting in because it grows so fast.  This is suber, a cork oak, not at all like a mulberry (I have them too) but there are other good oaks for bonsai.

The fourth picture is a tree (not mine) that is in the Weyerhaeuser exhibit in Seattle WA.  This is a photo that I took when we visited 2 years ago.  It is astonishing to see in person, and it served as my inspiration for the style of my cork oak that are the first 3 photos. 

 

Herman

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2013, 06:55 PM »
Hi Judy

I like the progression of you suber, I think its headed in the right direction ;)
I have 3 of them in very early stages of developement...they trunk up really fast and if you want reasonable taper you have to pinch the top back and let the bottom branches grow. Where im at, the winters worst is around minus 8 celcius, and even with frost on them all three made it through without missing a beat.

May I ask, what do you feed your suber?

Herman
 

Judy

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2013, 08:11 PM »
Hi Herman, I've heard that you really need to make sure to let the lower branches grow, as they are very apically dominant. 

I feed green dream, several times a year, and continuous feed (each watering) dyna gro's bonsai pro.  I also do once a month pro-tekt in the summer as well as some humid acid. 

It gets colder in my greenhouse than your low temps, I may need to try something different once winter really sets in.  Thanks Herman.
 

Joshua Hanzman

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Re: Re: quercus suber
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2013, 11:04 PM »
That's what I get for skimming:-\ the movement does resemble the Tucker tree though, congrats on that! What is your long term strategy for this tree?

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Judy

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2013, 10:40 AM »
I'm still getting to know the growth habits of this specie, so another year of observation at least.  Then at some point, into a smaller pot.  The basic shape is what it will be, but a lot more refinement is necessary.
 

Judy

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2014, 03:35 PM »
I did decide to repot this into a smaller pot this year, so defoliated partially, and it's since popped bazillions of buds.  There are still tons of buds on the branches in the photos that look bare, so I guess I know that these are bombproof.  It came thru winter with no problems in my cold greenhouse with no extra protection than any other tree. 

After the pics, I took off the rest of the old leaves.  This will be left to grow all summer, wiring in late summer perhaps.
Cochoy pot.
 

Herman

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2014, 02:34 AM »
Hello Judy :)

Looking good, I like how the texture on the pot suggests the cork bark to come on the tree  ;D
Yes these do push a lot of buds if they are healthy. The leaves can also reduce a great deal. I really like to work on subers, such a great subject for bonsai

kind regards
Herman
 

Judy

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2014, 07:29 AM »
Hi Herman, it does seem like a fun tree to work.  What is your method of leaf reduction on these? 
 

Herman

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2014, 09:13 AM »
Hi Judy,

Actually nothing special. I remove larger leaves and leaves sitting at the bases of branches when I see them, not too much though as they slow down quite considerably if you overdo it, I think ramification also plays a large role on the leaf size of subers, and of course placing it in full sun all day long helps too :), these guys cope very well under the African sun. Will post mine and my fiance's cork oaks for you, if i may do so :?

where do you place yours?

kind regards
Herman
« Last Edit: May 27, 2014, 09:16 AM by Herman »
 

Judy

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2014, 09:52 AM »
Full sun all day for me, even these new leaves seem fine in the full sun mode.  Yes, please, I'd love to see some pictures of yours and your fiance's!  Good for you that you have both caught the bonsai flu :D
 

Herman

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2014, 05:26 AM »
Ai it's a nice flu to live with  ;D we actually met at a bonsai workshop  ;D

I was in a bit of a hurry this morning,  so I quickly snapped a few shots of how small some of the leaves are on mine. Will create separate threads for the trees themselves. Mine looks like nothing atm, but she wired hers a few weeks ago and it looks amazing to me

Kind regards
Herman
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 05:28 AM by Herman »
 

Herman

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Re: quercus suber
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2014, 01:04 AM »
As promised,

The first one is my fiance's suber that she wired out recently, second one is mine that I still have to wire. So it doesn't look like much atm

Excuse the bad photos, twas a bit cold and my hand wasn't perfectly still

Kind regards
Herman
« Last Edit: May 30, 2014, 01:07 AM by Herman »