Author Topic: Native Elm  (Read 9146 times)

noissee

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2010, 10:53 AM »
Jay, where do these elms usually grow? (hardwood stands, pine stands, swamp or bog, field, etc.)
 

M.B.

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2010, 01:56 PM »
donmaple, that's a great visual to explain water retention. It makes sense that gravity plays such an important role and spreading water/soil out over a bigger shallow area will actually hold more. Thanks! This may make me rethink some of my trees and the pots they're in.
Mary B.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2010, 04:25 PM »
Very nice - lovely proportions.

Are there older photos of this tree?
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2010, 07:41 PM »
Hey Steven, I'm not sure what you mean by 'sugar shock', but I've taken half or more of the root ball off in the middle of summer and most of the time the tree doesn't seem to care. sometimes it will look a little wilty for a day or two, but they always just keep on growing.

John Hill, it's good to see you here. Thanks!

Mary.  I don't think you sidetracked my thread at all. Most of us are here to learn.
I use freshly ground and sifted pine bark-I soak it for a few days to get it saturated with water- and upwards to 10% dried sphagnum. or even more if I'm potting blueberries. So far, it works for me. Then again, most every thing I have is in grow boxes or oversize pots...I can usually only water once a day.

This tree was about the same size when I collected it in 2005.  I'll hunt for a pic later.


Don,  Thanks, and I don't mind at all

noissee,  Good question as to where these elms grow.. I found mine on the side of my drive on the high side of the ditch. This general area is classified as wetlands, though it's dry most of the time.


Jerry, I'll hunt up some more pic for a later post.

And a special thanks to Dorothy, you do a far better job on these Fl. elms than I can hope to.

Jay
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2010, 09:17 AM »
As promised, here are some earlier pictures of this tree.
The first one is of the tree as part of a group that I put together when first collected. I didn't like the group, so the tree became a single.
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2010, 09:31 AM »
And the rest
The last two show how the tree roots grew so strongly that they pushed the tree right out of the pot.

I had been leaving the pot partially submerged in water because of it drying out too fast during the summer. This was the year I had tried to go mostly non-organic in my soil mix, and the small pots just wouldn't hold enough moisture to last until the evening when I got home to water. It's amazing how the roots grew when they had all the water they could use.

Jay
 

Dennis_S

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2010, 06:43 PM »
I like this tree better in full leaf.  The branches are confusing to my eye.  Very nice when its leafed out. 
 

ericrobinson

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2010, 09:41 PM »
Jay,
Great tree and progression shots!  I like the scar line in the front...gives the tree character.  I also like the winter silhouette as the ramification is coming along well.  Thanks for sharing it with us.
 

rockm

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2010, 08:16 AM »
"When it gets hot around here I move the trees to a more shaded part of the yard and  set them on the ground, but it's slowly becoming  too shaded as the big trees get larger and cover more of the yard. Does covering the pots make it possible to leave the trees in full sun when it's 100 plus degrees."

Mary,

I think it depends on species, size of the pot/tree and your location. Covering the pot with a white T-shirt on hotter summer days can help keep pot temperatures down, while allowing the tree to remain in the sun. There are some caveats, though. Smaller pots are more vulnerable to temperature and evaporation. The smaller the pot, the more you have to monitor it and the more shelter may benefit it on days when extreme temps are forecast.

 I've found that native species are among the toughest in a given location. I routinely leave my Texas collected live oak and cedar elms out in full sun here in Va. all summer-with no protection. No. Va. piedmont is roughly the same USDA Zone 7 as Dallas, Texas. We get similar high August temps, but cool down in the autumn faster than Dallas, though.

 On one 102 F August day that was 102 F, I recorded a temperature in excess of 120F on the live oak's pot. It showed no signs of stress. It is a very large tree in a very large pot--which holds five gallons plus of soil...That mass protects the roots very well in cold and hot temps.

As the size of the pot decreases, temperature's effects become more dramatic and immediate. Smaller pots heat and cool much faster than a larger one. Mass protects roots. Lower temperatures in the interior of the pot also tend to keep water from evaporating.
 

JTGJr25

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #24 on: January 19, 2010, 10:20 AM »
Very nice elm Jay.  This tree gives me a very warm feeling reminding me of the trees that line my street back home.  I like it both in and out of leaf.  Both have a very natural look.

Rockm, after describing your oak I am now very interested in seeing this large tree.  Care to share?

Tom
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2010, 08:34 AM »
Posted by: Dennis_S
I like this tree better in full leaf.  The branches are confusing to my eye.  Very nice when its leafed out. 

Thanks Dennis, I didn't have any good pics of the tree in leaf in 2009 but , for the most part, they were much smaller than the pic shown from 2008. The branches are much less confusing in person.

Eric, Thanks, and you're welcome! I love the scar as well, but it is slowly disappearing as time goes by.

Tom, Thank you.
 

rockm

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2010, 09:13 AM »
Tom,

I don't own a decent digital camera, so no decent, useable pic...I used to have one of the tree on another forum. That forum has since gone away.

I got the tree from Vito Megna, in Austin about a dozen or so years ago. Vito had some truly outstanding (and big) collected stock...
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2010, 10:04 AM »
And the rest
The last two show how the tree roots grew so strongly that they pushed the tree right out of the pot.

I had been leaving the pot partially submerged in water because of it drying out too fast during the summer. This was the year I had tried to go mostly non-organic in my soil mix, and the small pots just wouldn't hold enough moisture to last until the evening when I got home to water. It's amazing how the roots grew when they had all the water they could use.

Jay

Jay, in my job I am gone for 14 hours some days (with commute) and found the only sure way to make certain my trees have the water they need was to build a mist system for them with a good timer. A starter kit from DripworksUSA is only about $50 and the timer less than that or more, depending on how fancy you want to get. That way my trees get watered a couple of times through the day and I check them when I get home in the evening. It has made my life much easier.
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2010, 10:28 AM »
LoL. That has been on my list of things to do for a long time. It would certainly be easier with an automatic system.. Maybe this year.....
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Native Elm
« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2010, 02:09 PM »
The thing is, it's cheap and takes very little time to set up initially...it's well worth it.