Author Topic: Carpinus turczaninouii  (Read 4508 times)

bretts

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Carpinus turczaninouii
« on: July 17, 2009, 10:26 AM »
Here is a before and after of the first styling of a new hornbeam. Some stubs and bumps will be dealt with in time. There are two main lower branches that are not represented yet.
I think the tree tells a story of great strength.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2010, 11:12 AM by bwaynef »
 

bretts

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2009, 10:30 AM »
First style
 

AlexV

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2009, 01:22 PM »
Hi Brett

Looks like it is coming along.  I am wondering what you are using as your front.  If I had to guess it would be the second pic in each post.  Looks like nice material to work with.

Alex
 

bretts

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2009, 06:13 AM »
That was my first choice for front but then I felt that the tree showed what it was really about from this angle. It has less movement but I think the strenght that it shows is appropriate.
 

AlexV

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2009, 02:28 PM »
Ya I agree that is a better front, I guess I was just trying to get some movement in the trunk, but the other view doesn't get movement until the top, so it isn't really better.  The only thing I think I would note is I would aim to make the left foliage pad from your virt bigger.  I would want it to be almost twice as wide as it is.  Thanks for sharing!

Alex
 

bretts

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2009, 08:38 PM »
Good piont Alex. I had read one of Peter Adams critiques of a cotoneaster that used the branch length to excentuate the small movement. Although I was thinking the right branch should be longer than the left I think shortening the right branch and lengthening the left will help the movement.
This is the virt I did after realising this.
Is that getting closer to what you are thinking?
 

AlexV

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2009, 12:42 AM »
Actually that works as well.  I will upload a virt from the other front, but I would use similar foliage whatever front you go for.  It is totally a matter of preference, but I tend to like to see lower branches extend farther than the upper cannopy.  Breaks and negative spaces can also be very powerful in our perception of a tree.  Most really old trees don't seem to be uniform, they actually stick out in places and die back in others to create layers that convey depth.  Many deciduous bonsai end up in a very uniform solid mass that I don't find as attractive, but that is totally personal preference.

Alex
 

bretts

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2009, 07:45 AM »
I am not keen on the solid mass style you describe either. It would be easy to let a great deal of the trunk get coverd by the foliage pads on this tree but I will be trying to keep 2/3 of the trunk showing when in leaf. Some gaps between the pads will be good. Can't wait to see it LOL
Thanks for the interest :)
 

AlexV

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2009, 11:20 AM »
Absolutely.  Please keep posting pics as the tree develops!

Alex
 

JTGJr25

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2009, 01:23 PM »
Very good material the nebari is impressive.  I think Alex's virt will show off this trunk in the best way.

Tom
 

donmaple

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2009, 10:30 AM »
Brett, I hope you don't mind but I did some styling on your tree. You see it is late fall here and I was bored. I am new to this site and was looking back at earlier posts to see all the good stuff I missed. I think you tree is quite impressive from all angles, and here is maybe another option. Would you or have you considered using the middle photo as the front. They all look good as the front, great base and even better nebari. If you connected the three shari to create one long lightening strike shari, it might be very interesting. Just another option to consider, I will not be offended if you don't like it. Thank you for posting such a strong tree. it is great to look at and fun to style, and best of all...no damage was done to your tree! Would it be posible for you to post a recent pic, is it spring there? Thanks, Don.
 

JTGJr25

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Re: Carpinus turczaninouii
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2009, 08:14 PM »
I just wanted to point out that when a deciduous tree has a canopy of leaves in one solid mass this normally means that the tree is meant to be shown when leafless.  In order to create a tree with densely ramified twigs then a large amount of foliage is needed in order to create those twigs.  The downfall to creating a tree with such ramified branching is that when in leaf there are no dead spaces, essentially it is just one large mass of foliage.  So when thinking of creating a deciduous bonsai one must decide whether they want to show it in leaf or out of leaf.  This way the tree can be grown to look its best in either one of those forms. 

Take a look at this link, http://bonsaijournal.com/worlds-2-deciduous.php and focus on the third and fourth trees down.  you can see that it took many years of hard work to create such ramification but in order to appreciate this work it must be shown leafless.  If this tree were shown in mid-summer the viewer may not see the true beauty of the tree because it just looks like a mass of leaves.

Tom