Author Topic: Korean hornbeam  (Read 10753 times)

Hotaction

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Korean hornbeam
« on: January 28, 2010, 09:21 PM »
Ok so, according to the information upon purchase this was planted in a growing bed in 1996, and potted up in 2005. It hasn't been repotted since from what I can gather. I bought it last June. There were a couple large pruning scar that i figured would never heal (could have been dead wrong), especially w/o going back into the garden. So, I carved it a bit (more to come later) with the dremel i got for my b-day.
The stove pipe obviously needs to go. How should I attack this tree come spring? Should I leave the pipe for a bit to thicken, or chop it now? I plan on repotting into some good soil, but here the KHB can be finicky. I'm just a noob and could use your advice.

Dave

« Last Edit: July 12, 2010, 11:10 AM by bwaynef »
 

noissee

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2010, 10:02 AM »
I like that third view. I don't really know anything about KHB, but I agree that it would be a good idea to regrow the leader from above that scar.
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2010, 02:29 PM »
pick a bud or branch on the stovepipe and cut back to it.  you should get many new buds popping on the remaining portion of the stovepipe after it starts growing again.  if you see a better bud for the apex lead then cut back to it.  once you make your 1st cut back, you should have lots of new growth to choose from.  your existing branches are going to be pretty thick.  if that bothers you then think about chasing them back a bit and growing thinner extensions.

or, pick an existing branch as your new apex and cut everything else off so you can grown new branches that are uniform in thickness.
 

Hotaction

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2010, 12:38 PM »
Thanks Don, There are a couple spots that provide for a decent transition with a chop.  I think I'll try the one that leaves room for error and develop it from there.  That way if i want to chop more in the future i can.  The branches will be quite thick, and I think I'll try to chase them back over time and develop it along those lines.  Thanks again for the imput.

Dave
 

Hotaction

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2010, 03:04 PM »
I snapped some pictures for my archives and thought I would share a couple. 

I repotted in march and it was a mess.  It appears that it had been slip-potted from a bonsai container into a container of regular (non-bonsai) potting soil.  As I began combing through the muck, half way through i found a mess of that yellow drywall tape junk, and then some bonsai soil.  I cleaned up most the junk and repotted it into a professional mix back into the same nersery container for development.

Now it is growing great and the foliage is a beautiful bright green (although the picture color doesn't really show it)

Dave
 

Hotaction

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2011, 02:02 PM »
Turns out that this tree is most likely a Japanese honbeam.  I let it grow wild all last year, and only cut the longest branches very quickly at the end of the season to allow for better storage.  I just removed the leaves Saturday with the help of some friends.  I'll have some pics coming soon, and perhaps we can bounce some ideas around before it's time to chop.

Dave
 

Hotaction

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2011, 01:55 PM »
Update:  Pruned and wired
 

plantmanky

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2011, 06:37 PM »
Turns out that this tree is most likely a Japanese honbeam.  I let it grow wild all last year, and only cut the longest branches very quickly at the end of the season to allow for better storage.  I just removed the leaves Saturday with the help of some friends.  I'll have some pics coming soon, and perhaps we can bounce some ideas around before it's time to chop.

Dave

It looks more like the European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) to me.  The japanese hornbeam has a much longer and narrower leaf than what yours has.

Randy
 

Hotaction

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2011, 02:07 PM »
Maybe a pic of the spring leaves emerging can help pin down a positive ID.

Dave
 

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2011, 01:34 PM »
Took some pics today, and gave this one a quick trim.

Dave
 

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2011, 02:15 PM »
After defoliating
 

tanlu

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2011, 03:09 PM »
Very nice branching development! Is that one or several trees?

I have two Korean Hornbeams that I need thicker trunks. Is putting them in the ground the only way to speed up this process?
 

nathanbs

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2011, 07:17 PM »
are you sure this is the same tree? What a transformation! good job!
 

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2011, 10:36 AM »
sorry never updated after defoliation.
 

jake4bonsai

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Re: Korean hornbeam
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2011, 03:56 PM »
Hi there! I dont have any khbs but i would like to get a nice one, one day. I do though have an american hornbeam, are the techniques for these the same as for the korean hb?