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Author Topic: Korean Hornbeam Raft Style  (Read 2495 times)
Jay
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USDA Hardiness: 4B

« on: May 05, 2010, 06:48 PM »

I finally took the step I needed to take. I purchased a tree that has been developed far more than any I have.
This is a raft style Korean Hornbeam. This tree and I have been talking to each other for a few years now. I final did the deal and obtained it. It will be left alone until I see the need for a change. I do plan on doing a bit of cleaning up here and there.
I welcome any observations or thoughts.

Jay
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mcpesq817
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2010, 08:52 AM »

Nice acquisition - I like it very much.  Grin
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Jay
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USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2010, 10:51 AM »

Thank you!

This is by far my biggest tree (not counting a collected apple from this season).
It has some faults but I really enjoy it. You can see the extremely straight section of the main trunk that has little tapper. It is not correctable but should be able to  be hidden with foilage.

Does anyone have other thoughts?

Jay
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Dave Murphy
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USDA Hardiness: 7b

« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2010, 12:37 PM »

I'm reluctant to offer any advice until I see it without leaves.  Still, it seems to have a nice base, and I wonder if there is any more nebari hidden under the soil.  Also, I can't help but wonder whether the tree would be improved by significantly reducing its height.  Good luck with it...I'd love to have a hornbeam like that...

Dave
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Jay
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USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2010, 04:45 AM »

Dave, thanks for your thoughts. I agree it is very difficult to offer advise without seeing the 'bones' of the tree, I will post a picture this fall when it is bare of leaves. I will also look at the possibility of reducing the height.

As for the Nebari and under soil roots, it's pretty much as the picture shows. It does not show that this tree was planted  in this pot with a shoehorn, the roots go from the right edge to the left edge. Feeling with my fingers it does not appear to have much additional large roots below the surface, this will be proven true or not when I re-pot possible next spring. This tree has been in this pot for a couple of years.

As to the pot, any thoughts from the group?

Jay
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Jay
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Posts: 405
USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2010, 03:21 PM »

Here are two pictures of this tree taken earlier this week. The colors are not as bright as my other Hornbeam but still very nice. First picture is the front, second the back. Sorry for the poor placement of the backdrop.

J
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Zach Smith
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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2010, 04:42 PM »

Here are two pictures of this tree taken earlier this week. The colors are not as bright as my other Hornbeam but still very nice. First picture is the front, second the back. Sorry for the poor placement of the backdrop.

J
Nice tree, Jay!  I don't find the straight section on the main trunk to be that bad visually.  All trees are flawed in some way, and that's part of the fun in my view.  However, I do think the similarity in trunk thickness between the main and secondary trunks is a bit more of a problem.  Not sure what can be done about that without cutting the secondary trunk back hard and regrowing.  I'd use foliage to disguise it at least for a while.

Looking forward to seeing the tree bare.

Zach
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Jay
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USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2010, 05:41 PM »

Zach, Thanks for your thoughts.... I think you will see the two trunks are not the same size when the tree is bare in a few days/weeks. Certainly not at the Nebari.

I will try and get some pixs before it goes away for the winter.

J
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Zach Smith
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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2010, 06:06 PM »

Zach, Thanks for your thoughts.... I think you will see the two trunks are not the same size when the tree is bare in a few days/weeks. Certainly not at the Nebari.

I will try and get some pixs before it goes away for the winter.

J
Jay, I meant that the straight section on the main trunk has a "mirror image" on the secondary trunk in terms of thickness.  Ideally, you'd want the thickness of the secondary trunk to be proportionally smaller than that of the main trunk based on height, in this case two-thirds or so I think would work.  Bear in mind that this is hardly a major issue; it's just something that caught my eye.

Zach
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Jay
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Posts: 405
USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2010, 05:44 AM »

Sorry I either didn't understand you or more likely am trying to not notice what is.....  As you said (to me) it is not  a major issue and I will be looking to move a branch or two to cover it over time.

J
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Jay
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USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2013, 08:08 AM »

Although the temps here in Vermont are still in the 60s to 70s day time, and above freezing (mostly) at night, the trees feel the shortening days......
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Judy
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« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2013, 12:48 PM »

Beauty shot!  Wonderful coloration. Have you thought any more about a different pot?
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Jay
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USDA Hardiness: 4B

« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2013, 02:13 PM »

Judy, thanks for your thoughts. As you can see the tree is in a new pot. The new pot is a bit longer and lower. The tree is also tilted forward about 10-15 degrees. This pot is a natural unglazed brown. I am looking for a better pot long range. Any thoughts? Color? Etc
Jay
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Judy
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« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2013, 04:33 PM »

I have a similar hornbeam in a similar pot, although mine isn't as shallow, and my pot might be a bit darker.  I just think that it's too dark for the light bark, and doesn't suit (at least mine) very well. I know a lot of folks would do a blue or cream.  I've also been told that it depends on which season you wish to highlight of the tree... I'm still trying to figure it all out myself. 
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John Kirby
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USDA Hardiness: 6



« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2013, 05:15 PM »

Think about something exotic lite a crackle off white, a pale blue or a light or pastel green. Nice tree, time to plan on wiring and building ramification.
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