Author Topic: Korean Hornbeam #2  (Read 3501 times)

Jerry Norbury

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Korean Hornbeam #2
« on: November 22, 2010, 12:04 PM »
This is the second Korean Hornbeam I bought earlier this year. This one has significant trunk rot and needs "something" doing. My options appear to be:
1) Wood preservative and ignore it.
2) Airlayer new roots onto it.
3) A wooden leg - a tanuki of sorts.

 

Mike Pollock

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2010, 10:55 AM »
I'd work the deadwood and preserve it. Perhaps even open it up some more.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2010, 11:50 AM »
What about that little hump visible in the second photo - what would you do with that?
 

Jay

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2010, 01:14 PM »
Jerry, is the second photo your Front?
J
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2010, 04:14 PM »
I like the first one - but that's because I don't like the hump around the deadwood part and it's less obvious from photo 1.

What do others think?
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2010, 04:26 PM »
I kind of like the hump.  If you're going to use the deadwood/hollow as a feature why not use the hump, too?
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2010, 05:26 PM »
I look at the hump and I only see this:

http://www.victorian-ebooks.com/WinterCatalog-1886/images/cloakscatalog-1.jpg


[admin-edit]Please don't place inline images here.[/admin-edit]
« Last Edit: November 23, 2010, 06:16 PM by bsgAdmin »
 

Jay

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2010, 05:26 PM »
Well Jerry, I too like the hump, think it gives the tree some character. I will say I am not the best at view a 3D object in 2D.
You see it in person, but... the tree in the second view is different, unusual. Something to think about.

my two cents
J
 

Zach Smith

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2010, 06:22 PM »
This is the second Korean Hornbeam I bought earlier this year. This one has significant trunk rot and needs "something" doing. My options appear to be:
1) Wood preservative and ignore it.
2) Airlayer new roots onto it.
3) A wooden leg - a tanuki of sorts.


Nice tree, Jerry.  My vote on this is to work with the damage, a combination of lime-sulfur and wood filler carved to look as natural as possible.  Another possibility would be a stone, if you could find the right one and "fit" it properly.  The good thing is, the damage is very interesting and you really don't want to lose it as it's a unique feature.

Zach
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2010, 06:31 PM »
Stone? Hadn't thought of that - I have quite a few bits of stone I've collected over the years. Maybe make one of Tufa or Lava.
 

Zach Smith

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Re: Korean Hornbeam #2
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2010, 06:38 PM »
Stone? Hadn't thought of that - I have quite a few bits of stone I've collected over the years. Maybe make one of Tufa or Lava.
This past spring at our state bonsai convention, one of Guy Guidry's pearls of wisdom was that most trees have flaws and it's our job to correct them.  He specifically noted in one of the demo trees that it didn't have rootage on one side, so why not put a stone there?  We don't always think of out-of-the-box ways of correcting problems, but this was a good eye-opener.

Zach