Author Topic: Journey with maples  (Read 5860 times)

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Journey with maples
« on: December 11, 2013, 12:40 AM »
Here are two  japanese maple in their winter display. They are actually my bonsai beginnings because I never owned japanese maples before and so far I'm not having any trouble. My thoughts for the first one Is removing the right most branch. In addition I'm not sure which view will be the best front. The triple trunk probably needs more work. The middle trunk does not have any mid level branches, which is a disappointment. I also want to remove the thick branch on the smallest trunk. I also do not know which view would be the best front but I admire the view with the hallow looking trunk near the nebari. I am in need of your thoughts!
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2013, 12:43 AM »
More pictures
 

Judy

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 08:46 AM »
This clump is similar to one that I have.  I'm planning on cutting back to introduce better movement to mine.  You may want to think about that, as your middle trunk doesn't have a lot of taper.  I think I'd cut the left one back to the lowest branches at least, and cut the right one as well.  These will pop buds everywhere if you decide to chop them back to restart the framework, so you could really get branching anywhere you want if you want to take the time...
 

Sorce

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2013, 10:20 AM »
I agree.

Possible chops.


 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2013, 06:04 PM »
Judy, I never done serious pruning like cutting back before so I'm not sure what the proper methods should be. You mentioned cutting "I'd cut the left back to the lowest branches at least," does not mean making a chop above or below the lowest branch? I will make mark up the photo similar to Sorce so I will have a better idea of what your talking about.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2013, 06:16 PM »
Is this a good idea Judy? In addition how should those cuts be made? Can you show your clump too
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2013, 06:28 PM »
I forget to ask what time of year this should be done?
 

Judy

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2013, 06:52 PM »
Read this blog post about maples by Al, it's a really good overall course of action for maples.  He specializes in tridents, but it can be used on other maples as well.
This should answer most your questions, if you have more, fire away.

http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2013, 07:35 PM »
Look specifically in the trident maple section or the post on his home page?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2013, 08:49 PM »
You are best to wait until the tree starts to swell in spring. Typically you are better served to cut roots and chop trunks at the same time. Stops the tree from bleeding out. This is especially true, the bleedig out, when you are in periods of cold and then less cold weather. Think maple sugar.

Take a look at Peter Teas work at Aichi en. Use the index and checkout the Japanese and Trident Maples.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2013, 08:56 PM by John Kirby »
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2014, 02:26 PM »
The buds are swollen and getting ready to open so I decided it's a good time to make the next step. I went into a yard dug a hole about the size of the tile that I purchased. I used whatever I had left over of Boon's mix and added the rest with garden soil.
 

Jay

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2014, 02:51 PM »
Keep an eye on the weather.... I know you are south of me (far South) but I'm far from through with winter.
Was it easy to dig the trench/hole for the trees? Was there any frost left in the ground? This comes from someone who lives where the last day for frost is June 1st.
As for the soil, if they are in the ground I don't think it matters that much....
But keep an eye on temps you may need to mulch this kids.....
Jay
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2014, 04:01 PM »
Jay, there was no frost in the ground. It hit mid 50s a couple of times these past weeks. Fortunately, it even hit in the low 60s today. I followed your advice and added sphagnum peat moss. The weather can be very unpredictable.
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2014, 06:47 PM »
I had kids playing in the yard this past weekend and they accidentally ran down the clump. Unfortunately, the three trunks broke off. In hopes of keeping the tree alive I decided to clean up the mess. I quickly slipped pot,made angle cuts all on one side of the tree, curved the cuts to be concave and slice around to expose the cambium. Lastly, I sealed the cuts. What do you guys think?
 

tmmason10

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Re: Journey with maples
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2014, 04:28 PM »
Shohin!? Tough break, I'm not sure chopping in September will be ok. I had a seedling in the ground that was chewed to a stub around the same time and it did pop back next spring, however.