Author Topic: Hops Hornbeam  (Read 4821 times)

M. Frary

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Hops Hornbeam
« on: May 04, 2014, 08:53 AM »
    I collected this earlier this year. It's the tree they call ironwood around here.
 

Sorce

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2014, 10:40 AM »
Nice base! Any buds popppin?
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2014, 03:53 PM »
  I only dug it up 2 weeks ago. Its still pretty nasty here yet and no wild trees have started popping yet so I have hope. I couldn't believe all the feeder roots it had growing out in the bush. Lots! This my first one of these so I only collected one to see how it grows. If they are bonsai suitable I'm grabbing a load of these next year.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2014, 08:50 PM »
They often have a very upright habit.  I've seen a few good ones though.
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2014, 09:43 PM »
  All of these that I see are usually pretty straight. I figured it was because they grow in the middle of the woods. I can't find any regular american hornbeam. Wouldn't they both live in the same types of areas?
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2014, 04:19 PM »
Nice stump, it will be interesting to follow its progression

Ostrya virginiana - hop flowered hornbeam, (some call it Carpinus virginiana) in my experience tends to be found in moist to somewhat dry, upland wooded settings. Carpinus carolina - Loose flowered hornbeam - tends to be found in lower, wetter, more mesic woodland settings than Ostrya. I often find Carpinus carolina on secondary flood plains right down to stream banks. Where Ostrya seems to almost always be above the secondary flood plain. They can grow side by side, but for the most part, Ostrya tolerates more sun and drier conditions, Carpinus can tolerate short periods of flooding, and definitely needs more moisture, more shade and more humidity. But certainly both species need growing conditions that have more moisture than one would give a Japanese black pine. They both appreciate a little shade, neither will do well in hot Texas sun.  A few hours of morning sun followed by dappled shade is probably best.

If you are in the sand counties in Michigan, look for Carpinus, loose flowered hornbeam, closer to streams, or on large hummocks in the swamps. In an upland setting Michigan's sandy soils can be too dry for many species. If you have oaks nearby, it is too dry for Carpinus. Ostrya likes it more moist than red or black oak, but they can easily grow where white oak grows, which is still somewhat too dry for Carpinus.

 



« Last Edit: May 30, 2014, 04:30 PM by Leo in NE Illinois »
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2014, 12:47 AM »
  A bud finally popped open. It's a little low. I'm hoping it will get some growth farther up the trunk. If not I've some chopping in the spring.
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2014, 03:32 PM »
  A little update.
 

Sorce

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2014, 05:54 AM »
Nice.

A great feeling....those first shoots!
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2014, 06:59 AM »
  Yeah but the leaves! They're huge. And it never popped buds near the top just the one out the side. I'm moving and when I get there this is going straight back in the ground for a few years to grow out. There are a load of these and American hornbeam growing out back. I'll be collecting a bunch of the American hornbeams next spring.
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2014, 10:43 AM »
Big leaves means more sugars for growth, excellent. It may push more buds off the trunk as the tree picks up vigor. Or not. I would give it at least a full year, maybe two before shaping and carving the trunk. If it builds enough energy, it may continue to bud back with more buds. You also want the new branches to harden off a bit before carving, as it is easy to damage tender shoots. Glad it took for you.

You might consider letting the new leader grow until it is about half the diameter of the trunk, probably some 6 feet or more, then do another chop. grow out and repeat. This way you'll get taper. It will take a few years, fortunately it looks like you have vigorous growth, maybe as little as two years between chops for taper.

Cool trunk, good species to work with (and locally native, even better - adapted to your climate - winter protection can be minimal).
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2014, 10:38 PM »
  I'm going to plant it in the ground next spring for maximum output. It would be nice if it would push some more buds but I'm not holding my breath. Winter storage will be a snap. Just sit it on the ground next to the tamaracks and it should be fine. If not I know where there is hundreds of these trees growing.
 

Sorce

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2014, 05:22 AM »
M.zilla.

From what I read about your collection spot,

It sounds like you can chop these where they stand, and leave them to grow out again on all their standing roots? Is that not possible?

I only ask because you are putting them back in the ground.

Can you not collect them later? After you work them a bit?
 

M. Frary

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2014, 10:14 PM »
  I could leave them but they are mixed in with large trees like ash and maple that are used for firewood. A lot of smaller trees get mashed. I'm not sure how long a stump being grown out would last.
 

Sorce

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Re: Hops Hornbeam
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2014, 06:06 AM »
Mashed may add character!

Fell some firewood around it for folks to take. Then they womt mash it! And your tree will receive more light! Maybe put a biohazard sign up!

Sorce