Bonsai Study Group Forum

General Category => Deciduous Bonsai Discussion => Topic started by: Intriguedbybonsai on March 18, 2012, 08:27 PM

Title: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: Intriguedbybonsai on March 18, 2012, 08:27 PM
Does anyone know if these would be good candidates for bonsai? My mother used to have a forsythia shrub in her front yard for many years. This was long before my interest in bonsai. I never remember the trunk getting very large as far as taper goes. She just let it grow wild.
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: Owen Reich on March 19, 2012, 02:02 AM
I've seen some cool thin-trunked cascade stlye and many clump style.  Old trunks often die back.  They may live forever in Cali but I have no idea.  Great flower show. 
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: rockm on March 19, 2012, 02:42 PM
Not that anyone on this planet can afford this forsythia:

http://www.thegrowinggrounds.com/transplant/transplant.htm (http://www.thegrowinggrounds.com/transplant/transplant.htm)

but seems the guy got lucky in his search for landscapadori....

Worst thing about younger fosythia is that trunks and stems are hollow. Can't wire them easily...
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: Intriguedbybonsai on March 19, 2012, 11:28 PM
Not that I'd order anything from that guy, period. From what I've read at another forum, the seller seems to be very arrogant, disrespectful, and only in it for profit. But that tree is pure beauty.
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: John Kirby on March 20, 2012, 03:22 PM
Um, he is in business, while I don't deal with him a lot, he does have very nice material. I guess if more folks who were in the bonsai business were in it for the profit- they might still be in the bonsai business. Besides that, why would you want to try and import a forsythia in to California from the east coast? Lots of stuff in state anyway. One of the reasons that I buy a lot of trees in California (and many of my east coast friends do as well-) they are cheaper than most elsewhere, even with the transportation. Hope you find a nice forsythia, they are beautiful in bloom.

John

Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: rockm on March 20, 2012, 03:29 PM
SOMEONE apparently bought that fosythia, as it's marked SOLD at the bottom of the page. If memory serves me, the price on that thing was $8 grand.

The seller does have very nice material, but it is extremely expensive--although I have a feeling prices could be well, a bit flexible...I mean who's paying eight large for a non-import forsythia?
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: Intriguedbybonsai on March 21, 2012, 02:28 AM
Besides that, why would you want to try and import a forsythia in to California from the east coast? Lots of stuff in state anyway. One of the reasons that I buy a lot of trees in California (and many of my east coast friends do as well-) they are cheaper than most elsewhere, even with the transportation. Hope you find a nice forsythia, they are beautiful in bloom.

John



Oh, I'm not trying to import a forsythia. I was just curious since I saw a local seller on eBay saying that his cuttings are good for potential bonsai.
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: John Kirby on March 21, 2012, 08:24 AM
go buy one at your local box store, or nursery, they tend to lose value after the peak bloom and get marked down pretty considerably.
Title: Re: Forsythia, a good candidate for bonsai?
Post by: lvillebonsai on March 27, 2012, 01:49 PM
I took a cutting from a neighbor's forsythia border shrub in about 2007. I planted it out in rich soil and let it thicken until last spring (4 yrs). It's in a pot now and the width is approx 2 inches. It'll hopefully turn into a nice shohin, perhaps. Branching isn't too great right now, but they seem to bud back well with pruning. Not sure of the variety--the mother shrub is at least 35 years old.

They don't seem to bend well, as the other member mentioned in a reply to your post. And I think it's good to seal cuts w/ paste because I doubt it's good for water to collect within those hollow branches. May cause dieback.