Author Topic: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech  (Read 6674 times)

Steven

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2010, 09:26 AM »
Repotted the tree yesterday(nothing like spending my b-day getting dirty).
 

bonsaikc

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2010, 09:42 AM »
Sorry, Steven. I've just been hitting the high spots for a bit and lost track of this one. I think you are on the right track with your earlier pics of removing the largest piece of that fork at the top of the tree. This tree should be ever more delicate as you get to the top or the outer edges of the branch. One of my biggest mistakes over the years has been trying to use too-big branches that can never be shaped properly. So don't be afraid to cut back and work from new material. It's a nice tree. Good luck!
 

Steven

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2010, 08:36 PM »
Thanks Chris. If I'm remembering correctly, but could be wrong, on Beech cutting back on a branch and leaving no live buds on that branch the branch will die off completely. I plan on keeping the branches in check. I'll keep it posted.
 

John Kirby

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2010, 10:37 AM »
Graft.

I realize that you aren't posting these for educational purposes, but next time you may want to work the lower part of the rootball more, not nearly as hard as you work maples, but enough to allow you to remove all of the bad soil over a repotting or two. The things that really improve the roots on deciduous trees are removing all of the down growing roots and removing all of the really straight, non-tapering roots. Surface roots are like branches and trunks, they need to taper and have movement- and not cross. I know that repotting trees can be an emotional challenge as to how much to remove, but not getting the root structure corrected will lead to a long term problem. It is much easier to correct the roots before you get the branch structure worked out, if you shed a branch now, what does it matter? Later on it can be problematic. John
 

bwaynef

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2010, 10:51 AM »
Thanks Chris. If I'm remembering correctly, but could be wrong, on Beech cutting back on a branch and leaving no live buds on that branch the branch will die off completely. I plan on keeping the branches in check. I'll keep it posted.

Quote from: http://evergreengardenworks.com/cotoneas.htm
Beech will back bud, but with difficulty. Plants that are to be cut back should be young and vigorously growing. Try not to remove all of the preformed buds or you may lose the tree. Buds tend to form at branch collars, so overly thick branches can be removed and new, thinner ones started in the same location if you leave a small stub. This method can also be used to grow new branches where older branches have all their foliage at the tips.
 

Steven

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2010, 05:14 PM »
OK. During this trees awakening as the buds extended I pinched them back. Strong buds I left 2 leaves, weak buds I left 3-4 leaves. I have been going by an article written by Harry Harrington at http://bonsai4me.com/ on Fagus species. He demonstrates with F. sylvatica but I have contacted him and the same techniques can also be used for F. crenata. Using this pinching technique is supposed to force the tree to replace this lost growth/foliage. Thus, I'm presuming, wake up latent buds on the branches and trunk. I am at a loss on this. It has been just over a month since I completed this pinching back and I have not seen any new growth or latent buds pop except at 2 places(see pics). And these 2 places is where I DO NOT want growth(I know I can't choose where it pops). I am feeding it well. I have fert cakes from NorthStar Bonsai, the 6-6-6 ones all around and hitting it with fish emulsion and seaweed extract once a week. Is there something I am not understanding? Something I'm not doing correctly? Doing incorrectly? I have been reading that article over and over since fall of last yr. So much so that I printed it out so I could read it when not here on the 'net. Any help or suggestions will be helpful. Now here are latest pics. Thanks!
 

Steven

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2010, 05:15 PM »
Last pics.
 

Steven

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #22 on: April 10, 2011, 10:57 PM »
Well, haven't done much with this one over the past yr except for feeding and watering. But here are pics taken tonight(4/10/2011). The past 3-4 days I've been pinching it back as its buds extend out. After leaves have hardened off I plan to feed well for a month and then prune back branches. Grafting would be nice but until I can get good results from any and all seeds I've tried to germinate or find a seedling source I'll be doing it the pruning way to get the branches/branching I want.
 

Steven

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Re: First stylin of my largest Japanese Beech
« Reply #23 on: April 10, 2011, 10:58 PM »
last ones