Author Topic: First Potting of Field Grown Trident  (Read 7583 times)

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2012, 06:11 PM »
Thank You Don!  I already cut off the huge straight down roots...I love my sawzall! 

I too am really excited as I can envision what the tree will look like years down the road.  I'm giving it a 2 wk. rest before I start fertilizing the heck out of it, I read you should do that to newly transplanted trees.  Anyway, I have John and Frank to Thank as well for growing, and selling me this Trident! 

My back yard is finally starting to look halfway decent now too ;)
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2012, 09:45 AM »
I've been studying the tree quite a bit, and am wondering if I should chop the straight trunk off this season about 2" up.  And then let it grow.  If I wait a yr. to grow out, pick a new leader and then make the chop.  It'll seem like I've wasted a yr. in starting to a leader that obviously has to start low on that straight section of the trunk.  What do you all think?
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2012, 09:48 AM »
I would probably leave it. The act of cutting will likely disturb the trunk/roots and cause additional damage to those roots just starting to grow.
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2012, 09:51 AM »
Ok, Thank You Matsu.  Just needed an experienced voice telling me what's the right thing to do.  And I don't disagree.  Maintaining and furthering the health of the tree is first and foremost. 
 

roberthu

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2012, 04:49 PM »
I use just sand to plant collected tridents. Never failed and they all have massive roots after three month. But I usually wait until November to do the report and by that time, I trim the roots hard. Then I keep them in the garage for the whole winter. Hope it helps.
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2012, 12:45 AM »
Thanks for sharing Robert, I hadn't heard of using pure sand with Tridents, interesting what'll work ;)
 

John Kirby

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2012, 07:46 AM »
Sand (coarse) could work well, just get three 50 lb bags of sand.........

Get the picture?
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2012, 09:39 AM »
My back got the message crystal clear John lol  Sand is heavy as lead, taken from experience using it to make a koi pond I later had to throw out b/c raccoons kept killing my expensive fish...pretty funny/sad story.
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2012, 12:44 PM »
Here's an update.  Growing really well.  I finally had one bud break where I wanted it to be, but it's weak and being overwhelmed by the rest of the new growth.  Plus, with this heat, I got home a bit late from work and it had dried out and I lost like 5 tips of new growth, of course the weak bud was one.  No further insults fortunately! But the weak bud is only 2" long with like 3 or 4 leaves.  And hasn't started growing a new tip yet...but I'm sure the 103 yest, 102 today isn't helping.  At least I'm keeping it watered and fed well.

My question is should I cut back all the other growth to give my weak/new leader more light?  Or now that the roots are established, I could do a trunk chop and inch or so above the new leader?   You can see from the pics below where I'm pointing to the new leader, here are a couple of pics.  Suggestions anyone?
« Last Edit: July 06, 2012, 12:48 PM by Chrisl »
 

sekibonsai

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #24 on: July 06, 2012, 01:51 PM »
A partial defoliation and pruning away completely unwanted shoots maybe a good compromise. 

I would wait on the trunk chop- one major insult per year.  I can grow tridents in full TX sun in grow-out boxes as long as the roots are healthy. 

Perhaps consider shading the roots with cloth to keep the heat down?
 

John Kirby

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #25 on: July 06, 2012, 02:14 PM »
Just leave it alone. The leaves are supporting roots and their growth. Cut it back in the fall.
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #26 on: July 06, 2012, 02:44 PM »
Ok John, I just didn't want that bud to die off from being over shadowed by the rest of the growth.   But even if it doesn't thrive this yr., waiting to do another chop this fall 'should' make that bud stronger next yr.  Thanks.

sekibonsai, I have covered the west facing part of the tub with white foamy shelf liner stuff as that side dried out much quicker than the e. side of the tub.
 

jlushious

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2013, 05:32 PM »
Any update on this tree Chris?
 

Chrisl

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2013, 09:08 PM »
It died after I cleaned dead peeling bark nearly all around the base of the tree...like 270 degree of the trunk was dead. 
So sorry, not a happy ending.
 

John Kirby

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Re: First Potting of Field Grown Trident
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2013, 11:09 PM »
Well that is too bad, I have literally dug hundreds of these and only lost one or two. I sold 50 or so to Matt O and a friend in Chicago area, they lost one the first year between them. I always have grown mine under 30% shade in the siyth, here in NE full sun in the big tubs.