Author Topic: emergency repot on a trident  (Read 4716 times)

LordEOfBeckley

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emergency repot on a trident
« on: May 21, 2012, 09:12 AM »
Hello, Is it possible to perform an "emergency" repot on a trident at this time of the year? I received it last summer and didn't want to do it then, and school/work had me preoccupied over winter/spring and I missed my chance there. It's in ill health and not growing anything like my other tridents and the turface that it was planted in seems to have broken down too much. Is there anything that I can do at this point of the season?
Thanks in advance
 

nathanbs

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2012, 09:55 AM »
where are you located? Update your profile to save from having to be asked in the future. In most places you can do a mild root work repot right now. DO NOT treat the roots as you would in spring.
 

Elliott

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2012, 02:31 PM »
what you can do is a partial repot. you can just gently scrape off the top 25% or so of soil with a chop stick or tooth brush going real easy on any roots you encounter, and refill with good draining soil. cover that with a top coating of new zealand sphagnum moss that has been chopped fine.
 The roots will grow up into the new soil because of the plentiful nutrients, air, and moisture. When you do repot, you will have some healthy roots to work with.
 If the tree will come out of the pot with the root ball intact without crumbling away and exposing the rootball (if the soil will crumble away, than its probably not as bad as you think), then you can scrape away the outer layer on the sides and underneath also. replace with good soil.
 If you do this, be carefull when you water, as the water will tend to penetrate the new soil, but not the old soil and you can end up with the core of the rootball drying out, or it staying to wet, while the outer fresh layer dries normally, so pay attention to make sure the whole rootball gets watered evenly.
 

bwaynef

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2012, 02:42 PM »
I've seen a bonsai professional in my area defoliate a trident at this time of year (maybe a little later) and do a full repot.  I'm not sure how drastically he reduced the roots, but he did remove all the soil.
 

LordEOfBeckley

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2012, 11:45 PM »
Thanks for the replies and all the good info provided. I updated my profile location... thought I did that when registering. Thanks again.
 

nathanbs

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2012, 10:12 AM »
i would say you are fine for a repot just be easy on the roots this time of year
 

John Kirby

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2012, 10:10 PM »
Pictures before you do the evil deed?
 

Owen Reich

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2012, 02:09 AM »
Photos would be a good idea.  Defoliation of the silhouette would be advised, but you need to be careful on your watering.  I cannot specify as it always gets me in trouble  :'(
 

LordEOfBeckley

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2012, 10:36 AM »
Didn't take pics, but I did do the deed. I pretty much brushed off the top layers of turface off the root ball as suggested, poked around to see if there were other problem areas and gently raked the very edges of the rootball. All in all it didn't seem in too bad of shape, but it was kind of a mess, especially the topmost layer of turface. I potted it up in a bit of a larger squat pot and filled it in with a better soil mix. A week later and it's already starting to push out far more growth than it was previously, so I guess it's happy that I did it.
 

nathanbs

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2012, 01:22 PM »
almost always a good sign. good to hear
 

bwaynef

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2012, 07:26 AM »
Glad to hear that its apparently in good health.  In retrospect, I wonder if just doing what is typically done in the fall as soil clean-up (soji?) would've been just as helpful.  Basically, the top 3/4-1" is removed and freshened with new soil.  (Ir)Regardless, I'm glad to hear that yours is doing well.

A guy in my study group had this question for me recently: "Are you up for some repotting/root reforming on a small trident this fall?"  I'm not exactly sure what he's getting at with the "reforming" bit, but I guess I'll see.  Does anyone think that late July in SC would be too late to repot?
 

LordEOfBeckley

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2012, 09:13 AM »
Yup, grown more since the repot than it has in the year that I've had it.
 

roberthu

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2012, 11:03 AM »
Absolutely you can. Just do some trimming while repotting and keep the tree in shade for at least one week. Keep it indoor in a cool enviorment is even better. I did some repotting on my tridents last month and they did just fine. Do not do too much root trimming though unless you want to keep them in full shade for a long time.
 

Judy

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Re: emergency repot on a trident
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2012, 07:28 AM »
Indoors?  I've never heard that advice before... Shade yes, but not inside.
 Glad to hear it's doing well.  I'm surprised that you had an issue with turface breaking down,  was there something else in the mix?