Author Topic: Chinese Tallow  (Read 11546 times)

nathanbs

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2011, 02:01 PM »
i personally am interested in how tallow would do in So. California, I assume well. I like what i see so far and am interested
 

DBrock

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2011, 02:15 PM »
yes, it should do well their.  The reason they are so prevalent from Florida to Texas is that they were brought into Kentucky a couple hundred years ago, and they have been spreading every since.
If I can get your email, I can send you pictures of a couple that I have that are ready to sell.  They have been in pots since February.  I know that doesn't sound like long, but the pots are full of root.
My email is: dalewbrock@yahoo.com
 

bwaynef

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2011, 03:03 PM »
We're ok with selling things our members find useful ...as long as you're not here JUST to sell things to our members.  Check out http://bonsaistudygroup.com/marketplace-rules/ if you want to post your wares here.
 

DBrock

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2011, 03:57 PM »
Cool, will look at the rules to make sure how I go about that correctly.
 

DBrock

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2011, 04:09 PM »
I took a quick look at everything.  Definitely not just here to sell!  I just happen to really be into the Tallows right now.  I have been following many of the other posting, just haven't said too much as a novice.  Old saying, "Man with open mouth, has closed ears."  Just trying to learn and expand on what all I am doing in the world of bonsai. 
Since I and my wife are more closely monitoring financials, I am trying to expand my bonsai the old fashion way, sell and trade. ;D
 

Zach Smith

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2011, 06:53 AM »
I took a quick look at everything.  Definitely not just here to sell!  I just happen to really be into the Tallows right now.  I have been following many of the other posting, just haven't said too much as a novice.  Old saying, "Man with open mouth, has closed ears."  Just trying to learn and expand on what all I am doing in the world of bonsai. 
Since I and my wife are more closely monitoring financials, I am trying to expand my bonsai the old fashion way, sell and trade. ;D
If you're going to ship anything outside the fire ant "zone," you'll need to have a nursery inspection and all that goes with it.  Check out your Ag department's requirements.

Zach
 

DBrock

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2011, 07:13 PM »
Fall colors are finally showing down here near Houston.
 

rockm

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2011, 10:31 AM »
I would be extremely careful about knowing possible agricultural restrictions on shipping this species before you sell any. It is a notoriously invasive and destrctive species and many areas in the South are actively trying to rid themselves of the species. While I don't doubt that removing one and putting it in a container aids that effort, shipping them where they may not exist helps spread the plant...
http://www.texasinvasives.org/resources/publications/04_Tallow_TFA.pdf

http://fnpsblog.blogspot.com/2010/08/invasive-vs-aggressive-part-1.html
 

DBrock

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2011, 09:38 AM »
Thank you RockM for that information.  I am begining to understand why there are not more Chinese Tallows as bonsai trees.  There is alot of difference of opinion on whether Tallow is a tree that is appreciated in the United States.  The key words there are, "in the United States".  Historically, Tallow has been an important crop in China for centuries because of its oil production.  However, old Ben Franklin didn't have a clue of what he was starting when he imported them in because of their beautiful shaped leaves and wonderful fall colors. 
That PDF file you sent had the phone number to the Texas Forest Service.  I gave them a call and had a great conversation with their specialist on invassive species.  He did explain that Tallows are on the list of Texas Noxious Species and are illegal to sell (so much for that idea).  He really thought it funny about how well they work for bonsai.  Near impossible to kill.  The roots bud back quickly.  Seeds are viable for ten years on the ground, and birds eat them and thus spread the seeds.  We both aggreed that trying to irradicate them from the US is not financially feesible nor realistic.  Only thing that will stop the spread is the grow zones.  They like more tropical zones.
If you never have talked to your forestry service guys, you should.  Few people appreciate trees more than these guy and gals.  We had an extended conversation of all of the local invassive species and about bonsai.  He even wanted to see pictures of what all I was working on.
Now I understand why there are few Tallow Bonsai.  It is a shame because they lend so well to it.  However, that also means that if you are raising a Tallow as a bonsai, you have a rare tree and a rare treat.  Show it off at shows, but watch that someone doesn't come by, yank it out of its pots and stomp it to death for the greater good of your state.
 

rockm

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Re: Chinese Tallow
« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2011, 10:41 AM »
Good for you in calling the local forest service folks. Some sellers wouldn't have even considered doing that. I wish more people were as conscientious. 8)

As for the species itself, it makes very good bonsai, in areas where it's already established. If there are some near you, rip those suckers out and strap them into a bonsai pot. I am familiar with the species as my folks live in the "Big Thicket" in East Texas. There are a number of east Texas native species that make spectacular bonsai, but aren't used much as they're not well known. Cedar elm is one, Texas persimmon, wild plum and hawthorne are great too.

Forest service people are, indeed, unsung heroes that know a truckload of things about trees.