Author Topic: Carpinus caroliniana  (Read 3255 times)

pjkatich

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Carpinus caroliniana
« on: May 10, 2014, 07:02 PM »
Here are a few photos of an American hornbeam that I have been working of for a while.

This tree was developed from a stump that I collected in 1996.  It currently stands 30" tall and 32" wide.

Back in January, I had the pleasure of working with Owen on this tree.

The first photo shows the tree in January before any work was done.

The second photo shows the tree after Owen trimmed and wired the tree for me.  We decided at that time to change the front of the tree slightly by rotating the tree to the left.

The third photo was taken last weekend.  The wires were beginning to bit into the bark so it was time to remove them an do some trimming.

The forth photo shows the tree after the wires were removed and the branches were trimmed.

Your feedback is always welcome.

Cheers,
Paul
 

Judy

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2014, 07:33 PM »
Hi Paul, I like the natural feel this tree has.  The question I have is how did you manage to solve the base/nebari issue that is seen in the first photo?  It looks like the tree is at the same orientation, yet the opening that you see between the roots is filled in so nicely in the following photos. 
I have always loved the muscular feel of american hornbeams...
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2014, 08:10 PM »
Judy, I you knew about the magic wand technique.....
 

Judy

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2014, 08:53 PM »
No, but it sounds like something I need to know... ;)
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2014, 10:07 PM »
The hornbeam is looking great Paul.  Suggest growing new sacrifice branch on second tier on left.  Subtle power in that one.  Thinning vigrous shoots in the apex would be nice as well.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2014, 10:10 PM by Owen Reich »
 

BonsaiEngineer1493

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2014, 10:35 PM »
Very nice. I agree with Judy, the tree has a natural feel to it. I think the orientation changed so the opening is still there, but not displayed to us. If i'm wrong, I would happy to learn how it was filled.
 

Charles Willis

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2014, 09:02 AM »
I really like the feminine quality this tree has. I think it would look better with the apex thinned out a little bit to match the other branches.  ;D
 

pjkatich

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2014, 10:58 AM »
Hi Paul, I like the natural feel this tree has.  The question I have is how did you manage to solve the base/nebari issue that is seen in the first photo?  It looks like the tree is at the same orientation, yet the opening that you see between the roots is filled in so nicely in the following photos. 
I have always loved the muscular feel of american hornbeams...

Thanks for the positive feedback Judy.

In regards to your question about the nebari, just some bonsai slight of hand.  The front as shown in the first photo was rotated approximately 20 degrees to the left.  Pesto, a new front and a new prospective.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2014, 11:03 AM »
The hornbeam is looking great Paul.  Suggest growing new sacrifice branch on second tier on left.  Subtle power in that one.  Thinning vigrous shoots in the apex would be nice as well.

Thanks Owen.

I trimmed the larger leaves in the apex as we discussed.  However, I will go back into the apex and thin the branches out a bit more.

I appreciate your feedback very much.

Cheers,
Paul

 

pjkatich

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2014, 11:06 AM »
Very nice. I agree with Judy, the tree has a natural feel to it. I think the orientation changed so the opening is still there, but not displayed to us. If i'm wrong, I would happy to learn how it was filled.

Thanks for taking the time to comment on this tree.

You are spot on with your assessment of the nebari.  It was Owens keen eye that prompted this change which has definitely improved the appearance of this tree.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2014, 11:10 AM »
I really like the feminine quality this tree has. I think it would look better with the apex thinned out a little bit to match the other branches.  ;D

Hello Charles,

I appreciate the constructive feedback.

Thinning out the apex a little more is on my to do list.

Have a great day.

Regards,
Paul
 

Judy

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Re: Carpinus caroliniana
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2014, 05:46 PM »
The magic angle!  It really firmed up the tree picture.  You have such a way with trees that look like they are out in nature somewhere.... something I try to aim for.
Thanks for posting it Paul.