Author Topic: Burning Bush  (Read 8936 times)

J Evans

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Burning Bush
« on: July 18, 2014, 05:43 PM »
Here is a Burning Bush that I collected about two weeks ago.  I had intended to take more photos but my 2 or 3 hour project turned into almost 6 hours.  Has decent roots and I trimmed it back about 2 feet before digging.  It is doing ok considering that our temperatures have crept up to about 102-105 the last couple of days and I don't have any shade for it.  A small amount of leaves have burned but nothing major.  I hope that it can spring enough growth before fall so I can trim it back to a bit more manageable size.  I was removing it form our yard but looked at the base and was reluctant to part with it.  I am interested in any thoughts as to what to do with it, suggestions or even if you think that it isn't worth working on.  Thanks.

Jamie
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jeanluc83

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2014, 07:21 AM »
I collected one this spring that looked very similar.  It looks like you have some potential there.  I would say the hard work was worth it.

It would have been better to collect in the spring just before bud break but what's done is done. 

The soil you have the tree in seems very heavy.  I have read that they like water but it looks a little water retentive to me.  Also there better be drainage holes in that bucket.

You will probably not get much in the line of growth this year.  Euonymus have one push of growth per year.  This makes building ramification a slow process.  It also means that I would wait to do any additional reduction.

This tree will need to be chopped back hard.  Based on the pictures I would reduce everything it to be about 18” or less from the soil line.  I cut mine back and it responded with back budding everywhere.  These are tough trees but it may be a good idea to even wait a season before chopping further so that the tree can gain strength.

Good luck
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 07:23 AM by jeanluc83 »
 

J Evans

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2014, 11:31 AM »
Thanks for the reply

Do you have a photo of your tree?

We were doing some other yard work and this bush was in the way so I had to remove it when I could.  Yes spring would have been better but even with our extreme temperatures lately it seems like it is doing ok.  I do have some leaves that show some stress and burning but overall it seems pretty good.  I would estimate my leaf loss at say about 10%.

The photo that shows the soil is showing the soil that came with the tree.  Due to the long period of time that it took for me to dig it, the warm temperatures and the difficulty handling the tree I did not wash all of the original soil off the tree.  I bared the roots that were easy and then just got it into the pot.  Below that top layer is a mixture of potting soil, top soil and some sand.  I will most likely do a complete root ball cleaning and trimming the next go around.  There are drainage holes in the side of the bucket almost at the bottom.

I was hoping to get some new leaves as I would really like to reduce this some, even if just a little bit asap as it is very hard to handle.  I am concerned as I have this one and then a maple in the same size bucket that I will have to bury this fall and I haven't located a spot for either one of them.  It is a growing worry.
 

jeanluc83

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2014, 06:21 AM »
Here is the one I collected this spring.  The first is what it looked like right after collection.  The second is what it looks like today.  Pretty much everything you see has gown this season. 

I am planning on bringing this to a workshop with Nick Lenz this fall.  I still need to do some significant reduction.  I left more than I needed because I wasn’t sure what kind of back budding I was going to get.  I would prefer to let the tree rest for a full year but I want to get the structure of the tree set before I have too much more growth.  The branches also tend to lignify fairly quickly.  Unless you get wire on it early it is tough to get any movement out of the branches.

I’m sure that you will have good luck with your tree.  As I said they are tough.  In fact there are several states that have banned them because they have become invasive.

You can probably reduce it more this fall but I would wait until closer to leaf drop.  I don’t know what the best time is but the idea is to get as much fuel out of the remaining leaves going into fall.  It might be a good idea to seal the cuts as well.  I didn’t seal mine but it was actively growing so I’m not sure that it mattered as much. 
 

Herman

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2014, 06:32 AM »
love that trunk  ;D
 

J Evans

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2014, 11:56 AM »
I like how you got yours reduced down to a manageable size.  With the hot weather I kind of just rushed to get it out of the ground and into a pot.  I cut it back in many areas to the first leaf and thought that I shouldn't go any further.  I hope by the time say late October rolls around that I will feel good enough to reduce it down and maybe even pull it from the pot to see if I can reduce that end also.  I don't know how fast they develop roots but it sure be nice to get it into something that I can lift or at least manage so I can get it set into the ground for winter. 

Thanks for sharing your photos.  I really like your trunk.  How old do you figure it is?  18 - 20 years old.  Judging from the age of our house I think that mine is about 18.

Thanks again.

Jamie
 

jeanluc83

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2014, 11:28 AM »
I estimated it to be about 20 years old.  I counted the rings on a cut branch at 19 give or take.

I would be reluctant about messing with the roots again this fall.  I know these trees are tough but I’m not sure how they respond to being worked in the fall.  I reduced the roots and top significantly at collection and had good luck but that was in the spring.  I would wait until spring just as the buds are swelling.  Take it out of the pot hose off some of the outer soil then get it into a free draining substrate.  You could probably clean up the ends of the large roots but I would remove as little as possible.  The following year when the tree has recovered you should be able to clean out the remaining soil and reduce the root ball to something more manageable.

It has also been pointed out to me that they will not close wounds so be prepared to do some carving.
 

augustine

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2014, 12:56 PM »
Pamper it and leave it alone til a yr from now. Let it gain strength.
 

GBHunter

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2014, 02:13 PM »
I do have a burning bush the trunk is not as large but these are nice trees.
 

J Evans

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2014, 02:49 PM »
The tree still looks pretty good.  Not as good was when I dug it but still has most of the leaves that were there and branches seem to be a good green under the bark.  My problem is going to be this fall when I need to do something with this tree.  I cannot lift it and I really don't have a place to bury the tub as it is pretty good size.  I wish that we had decided to remove it in early spring but that didn't happen.  I was thinking maybe I could cut it down and repot into something manageable after it goes dormant.  Hate to take the chance but right now I am stuck.  Ideas?  Thanks.

Jamie
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J Evans

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2014, 04:38 PM »
Any ideas how I can get this ready for winter.  Too big to manage and/or plant anywhere in my yard.  Do I dare prune both the top and roots after it goes to sleep but before the big freeze?  Thanks

Jamie
 

Judy

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2014, 05:14 PM »
If you mess with it you may loose it. Can you just mulch it in on the ground somewhere out of the wind and sun?  I don't know where you are but these are plenty hardy where I live in zone 5. 
 

Dave Murphy

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2014, 06:32 PM »
What Judy said.  These are very hardy.  If possible, I'd drag this to the north side of your house then place hay bales around the pot.  Stuff the area between the pot and bales with leaves, or better yet, fill with wood chips.  If you have an outbuilding that stays cold through the winter...read that as below 40 F, that would work, too.
 

J Evans

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2014, 07:32 PM »
Thanks for replying.  I was thinking of doing that if it was my last resort.  I also have a maple tree I collected that is in the same type of tub although not as quite as heavy and not quite as big around but the same size tub.  I was thinking of building a box, setting both of them in it and filling it with mulch.  We are in region 5 and I really don't know how much insulation I need around them.  I know the more the better but is there anyway to figure out how much?  Thanks.
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Burning Bush
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2014, 10:54 AM »
Nice burning bush. I have not tried this species, but it is "on the List", when I have room for another tree, I might pick one up.

I am in zone 5b. (warmer half of zone 5). Any tree I have that is hardy in zone 4 or 3, my winter care is simple. I take the pots off the bench and put them under the bench. I drape a tarp over the bench, and leave the north side open. The tarp blocks the wind, and keeps the trees in the shade. The pots are packed together, and then some leaves are packed between them. Snow is shoveled over them. This seems to work quite well.

I use an unheated well house for my zone 5 and warmer requiring trees.

Getting the trees into the shade is key, sun in January and February can dehydrate exposed twigs, and freeze thaw cycling will damage roots systems. So winter shade is key. Mulch helps keep the pots frozen once they freeze.