Bonsai Study Group Forum

General Category => Deciduous Bonsai Discussion => Topic started by: Dennis_S on July 21, 2011, 08:21 AM

Title: Bald Cypress
Post by: Dennis_S on July 21, 2011, 08:21 AM
Any idea why bald cypress leaves will turn brown during the growing season?  Trees seem to be otherwise healthy.  New green shoots everywhere.  Even on the branches that turn brown.
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Larry Gockley on July 21, 2011, 10:09 AM
Bald cypress leaves are very fragile. Without knowing all the facts of your trees, I'm thinking they are getting too much hot sun for the reduced  root mass they have. The old leaves will not come back, but try to keep them a bit shaded, and move to more sun this fall. Larry
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: bwaynef on July 21, 2011, 10:13 AM
Are the leaves dry brown?
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Don Blackmond on July 21, 2011, 10:19 AM
usually, by July, intense heat and wind will cause browning of foliage.  just defoliate and get a new set of leaves.
if you keep it in dappled sun, or full sun for only a few hours of the day, you will most likely avoid browning leaves.  however, in hot, dry areas you will likely still get some browning.
contrary to what someone else said, bc are not fragile.  they are amazingly tough and adapt to climate conditions, hence shedding old leaves
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Chrisl on July 21, 2011, 11:06 AM
Good info!!  I'm glad you brought this up Dennis!  I've been keeping mine in full sun all day, maybe that's why one leaf turned brown on me.  I'll move it to shade today.  I agree Don, BC's are hardy, but their branches are SO fragile.  How long in years do you wait to wire a branch?  Especially now that I've been pinching the leaves back for ramification?
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Dennis_S on July 21, 2011, 01:48 PM
Most of my bc's are under 60% shade cloth.  Some are in full sun.  Soil is kept moist to wet.  The browned leaves are not dried out.  This has been going on since the early part of the season (about May). 
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Dennis_S on July 21, 2011, 01:49 PM
another
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Zach Smith on July 21, 2011, 03:08 PM
Just looks like normal summer heat stress.  We've been under serious drought conditions for years now, at least down here in the Deep South.  By May or June, it generally doesn't rain for weeks on end, which requires frequent watering.  Either the fact that we're getting a bit dry in between, or maybe the fact that we're using tap water, shows up in the leaves.  The good news is, it doesn't seem to deter the trees from putting out so many new buds you can get annoyed.  Better than no buds at all, of course.

Zach
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Dennis_S on July 21, 2011, 03:42 PM
tap water is an issue with bc?
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Don Blackmond on July 21, 2011, 03:46 PM
possibly root aphids.
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Larry Gockley on July 21, 2011, 05:14 PM
usually, by July, intense heat and wind will cause browning of foliage.  just defoliate and get a new set of leaves.
if you keep it in dappled sun, or full sun for only a few hours of the day, you will most likely avoid browning leaves.  however, in hot, dry areas you will likely still get some browning.
contrary to what someone else said, bc are not fragile.  they are amazingly tough and adapt to climate conditions, hence shedding old leaves
[/quote
Not wanting to be misunderstood, I did say the leaves were fragile, not the trees themselves. Larry
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Dennis_S on July 23, 2011, 05:16 PM
possibly root aphids.

Sevin the answer? 
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Don Blackmond on August 04, 2011, 10:23 PM
possibly root aphids.

Sevin the answer? 

orthene
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Owen Reich on August 05, 2011, 07:21 AM
Tapwater was never an issue for me in Nashville.  I also used well water (slightly basic) with no I'll effects.  I consider bald cypress to be one of the best native species in America for bonsai; especially I you aren't living in an area with ultra-low humidity.  I find beaver gnawed stumps from the swamp ideal candidates as all the ones I've collected had killer taper and natural fluted bases.  I found one to three foot deep water best as large top-chops were not necessary.  The beavers also made many of their "cuts" at flush angles and created interesting shari  ;D.  When I get back to the states I'll post some photos of their progression.  I've successfully defoliated the three ones I kept every July and it increased ramification every time over three years. 

I've been kicking around the idea of hydroponic culture and even aeroponic culture but have yet to pursue it.  I would love for others to try it too to see what happens.  One day I'll do a study with it.  Has anyone tried it yet?  One post on here referred to a koi pond test that was successful, but I'm thinking isolation for superfeeding.
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Larry Gockley on August 05, 2011, 10:04 AM
Hi Owen. I am also interested in hydroponic culture, especially for BC. Last winter, I acquired 40 BC seedlings, 1/4 to 3/4 trunk size. I wasn't sure how to procede as here in Texas we are in the hottest summer in 30 years, and the second worst
drought in history. We have had about four weeks and counting of 100 degree temps. I put some of the seedlings in a shaded garden area with a mix if about 1/3 perlite, to conserve moisture. Others I put in a bucket of water with an aquarium air pump areator in the bottom to supply oxygen. I add a weak fert. solution, and change it every few weeks. The ones in water buckets look fine. Some in the ground got brown leaves, (with new buds showing), but it seems I may have lost a few in the ground. It's hard to water enough at 100 + every day. I got the water bucket idea after seeing BC seedlings in the wild growing in nothing but water.  BTW, the trees in the water buckets increased their root mass by 3 or 4 times. Larry
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Owen Reich on August 05, 2011, 10:35 AM
Good to know.  I'm planning on pursuing the aeroponic route as oxygen supply is excellent and the results I've heard about from commercial produce growers (tomatoes, spinach, etc) and the ahem..... less legal producers seem to like the technology  ::).  If someone wanted to get really snazzy, a CO2 injected aeroponic chamber would really jam.  A bit overkill though as my bald cypress in 90% inorganic and 10% peat moss with liberal doses of synthetic fertilizer will produce 4 foot shoots in a season.  I'm more concerned with trunk caliper increase and branch development.  I am a bit worried about the transition from an aeroponic system to a bonsai pot but only a little.
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: rockm on August 05, 2011, 01:41 PM
I don't know... ;D Why devote that much time and $$ to something you can do for free in half the time? SImply planting a BC out in the ground will produce dramatic results in two years...
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: Owen Reich on August 06, 2011, 07:22 AM
Rockm, I agree to some extent.  However, what if it calipers up young trees faster or produces a massive nebari or something else that's hard to achieve rapidly?  I will be building a bonsai nursery when I finish my studies and have always wanted huge base shohin and chuhin bald cypress with perfect taper.  I met a man at Brussels Bonsai last year who sucessfully collected bald cypress knees and immediately grafted scions to them successfully.  I was very impressed.  I'm mainly trying something new.  It has been inspiring learning some of the Japanese tricks of the trade to create bonsai from material that seems worthless.  My efforts may be futile, but it can't hurt to try.
Title: Re: Bald Cypress
Post by: ironman on August 06, 2011, 08:19 AM
I like the way you think, Owen.