Author Topic: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)  (Read 8457 times)

Herman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2014, 06:58 AM »
Hello  Anthony,

I don't seem to have any pics of it in leaf on my phone, its budding out so if you can wait a month or so I can post some fresh ones :)

the base is about 5cm in diameter, trunk a bit less , say 4cm in diameter. its about 30cm high and a little less as wide.

In the bush they tend to look like large shrubs or small trees, I have seen some old(+-80) ones with very big trunks in proportion to their height and winding branches. This tree was never trained to be naturalistic and following that root now will produce a tree with a identity crisis  ;D so I'm aiming for a kind of a penjing look with this tree. I think my mentor had penjing in mind when training the trunk, we just never really discussed what her plans was for it...only the cultivation for this specific tree.


why is the ziziphus yourside un-cooperative? ours are difficult too!... I just happen to get lucky and get the exception to the rule?...I planted some seeds a few years ago and they seemed to be real odd-balls ; branches dying off for no reason...especially in spring. the worst cases were where a plant would abort all growth of the previous season and 2/3d's of the trunk, then bud again below that. I've never seen any other Z. Mucronata bonsai besides this one. so it's very special to me.

one thing I can say of this species in it's natural habitat is that in a region with high annual rainfall and cold winters, they seem to populate the rocky poor soils close to the ridges of hills and in the kalahari desert they seem to grow close to water  in very deep sand. In areas with moderate rainfall and not so cold winters they seem to grow in heavy soils too.... also they seem to grow in regions with acidic soils and in regions with alkaline soils.... very diverse conditions


hope this answers some of your questions

kind regards
Herman
 

Anthony

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2014, 05:34 PM »
Thank you Herman,

I am happy to wait for an image with leaves of such a handsome effort. Yes, same problem, branches die, and yet they resprout easily if chopped down to the root. Pity though, ours are the edible fruit type, and they have beautiful leaves and flowers, massive trunks and full heads of foliage.

Maybe it is a height situation, perhaps a 1 metre or so specimen needs to be tried, by us ?
Thanks again.
Good Day
Anthony
 

Herman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2014, 04:19 AM »
I'll see if I can't collect a bigger specimen when i go collecting beginning of September

kind regards
Herman
 

fredman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2014, 04:26 PM »
Here is some info... http://www.plantzafrica.com/plantwxyz/zizimucro.htm

Herman what do the people use for building open soils there? Is akadama, turface, pumice etc. available there?
 

Sorce

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2014, 05:27 AM »
Time to revive the clinker thread!

1\3 diamonds, 1\3 clinkers, 1\3 baboon teeth.

Dung beetles rolling fert cakes......


Sorce
 


fredman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2014, 05:59 AM »
Thanks Sorce ;)
 

DorianJF

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2014, 09:27 AM »
Hi Herman

Any update on the image for this Buffalo thorn.

Definitely like the way it looks and I see great potential with this one.

Well done.
 

fredman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #23 on: November 26, 2014, 06:33 PM »
Here it is....

 Here is a list of mediums I can get....

Pumice 3mm-6mm
Zeolite 6mm-10mm/ 2mm-3mm
Expanded perlite 4mm-6mm
Expanded clay :
 LECA 7mm-12mm
Crushed hydroton 3mm- 8mm
Hydroball 8mm-10mm

Stuff that's cheap and readily available are:
Pine bark chips
Composted pine bark
Washed silica river sand 2mm-4mm
Crusher stone varying sizes
Peat moss
Palm peat
Sphagnum moss

Wow Herman that is more than enough to build a killer soil with. That was a while ago. I'm very interested to know what works for you under that blazing African sun?   8)
 

Herman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2014, 11:52 PM »
Hello guys :-D

Fredman,

In the end I couldn't get pumice, due to the economic strain on our currency the company stopped importing pumice...ai. so I went and bought the new kind of hydroton, perfectly round shape, some composted bark and I broke some clinker. The mix I used for this tree was 40 clinker|45 hydroton|10 high cec rough palm peat| 5 sieved composted pine bark. The tree loves it! I pruned it twice already.  I have to be more vigilant than with our standard mix of compost and washed silica sand where watering is concerned. For my black pines I leave out the palm peat, but I tuink I'm going to add it to the mix when I repot my other pines next spring. Almost lost a tree to the heat, our early spring was extremely dry and hot!

Will go and take a kiki quickly. Don't get any chance to browse this site in my lunch anymore, because I do not take lunch anymore haha

Best regards
Herman
 

Herman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2014, 12:05 AM »
The pics

Excuse the dull looking ficus ingens the constant rain washed of the wax layer on the leaves and then the sun had acroyal time with the leaves. Lost quite a few chili plants and almost a london plane and a transvaal blue bush (some diospiros specie).

Kind regards
Herman
 

DorianJF

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #26 on: November 27, 2014, 03:00 AM »
Looking good Herman

Well done.
 

fredman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #27 on: November 27, 2014, 05:36 AM »
Ja its a pity you cant get pumice. What exactly is klinker? Is it something like a kooks? We used to use it in the blacksmith shop on the Railways. It can be heated over and over again without breaking down  :D
Or is it the baksteen?  ;D ;D ;D
Its good that you have composted bark. That is a good organic component for the fertilizer to hang on to...
I use it as a 1-2 year mix for the plants I develop. 5/1/1 bark,pumice,sphagnum moss.
As a bonsai soil I use 1/1/1 bark, pumice, moss.
Pumice are all over here. Along some lakes they litter the banks. Im talking all sizes from golf ball to the size of a car enjin  :D
Im also interested in Hydroton. What do you think of it? Does it hold water well?
« Last Edit: November 27, 2014, 05:48 AM by fredman »
 

Anthony

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2014, 07:10 AM »
Herman,

coming along nicely. Perhaps I will try again with our local dongs, they do have exceptionally beautiful bark.

On our side, clinker is a leftover product of iron production, but I won't use it due to what might be in it, traces of radioactive materials and various toxic metals.
Pumice = our crushed fired and sifted earthenware clay holds water / fertiliser within itself.

Compost handles most of the organic requirements, peatmoss is available as is cocopeat, or if needed coconut husk. Cocopeat by the way has the be imported from Sri Lanka.

We have a few other materials, that can work as soil, as much as the island is really a big deposit of clays, Stoneware, Earthenware and an Off White high firing clay, that occurs with our deposits of Silica based gravel used for construction.
Essentially for us what works is the very simple mixes, and particle sizes around 5 mm.
This way we keep Bonsai as a cheap Hobby - ha ha ha. [ Teasing Fredman ]
Good Day
Anthony

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We get a long strand type of moss from our Cocoa trees, used for airlayering, and as a test growing a Chinese serissa for about 4 years in it as a soil type. Gave no problems, pot was porous pottery.

We have also discovered that we can use the moss that is grown for the lawn effect, as a soil type as well. It's a sun tolerating, fine moss type, very pretty.
 

fredman

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Re: another winter image Ziziphus Mucronata(buffalo thorn)
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2014, 08:21 PM »
Ha Ha Anthony. Yes bonsai isn't a poor man or a lazy man's hobby ;)

I go as cheap as possible. All I buy is pumice, pine bark and sphagnum moss.
I steal the crushed granite from roadwork sites  :-X