Author Topic: American elms  (Read 2750 times)

Mnmbjc

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American elms
« on: February 15, 2014, 02:43 PM »
Can you treat this tree like other elms? I guess what I'm asking is can you apply the same techniques to this tree as you would the chinese a elm?
 

Sorce

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Re: American elms
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2014, 04:47 PM »
I would say yes, except when considering the larger leafsize,  and it's. Dormancy requirements.
 

Gaffer

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Re: American elms
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2014, 07:52 PM »
Yes you can. Depending on where you live just remember if you are useing a dry mix for your soil water every day.
Qualicum Brian
 

M. Frary

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Re: American elms
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2014, 09:55 PM »
 Zack Smith at Bonsai South has one for sale on his site and he says the leaves will reduce to around 1/4". I've got a couple I collected last year and we'll see how it goes. As for the techniques you implement on them for bonsai culture is the same as Chinese Elms.
 

Zach Smith

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Re: American elms
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2014, 07:45 PM »
Zack Smith at Bonsai South has one for sale on his site and he says the leaves will reduce to around 1/4". I've got a couple I collected last year and we'll see how it goes. As for the techniques you implement on them for bonsai culture is the same as Chinese Elms.
Trust me, the leaves reduces amazingly.  People are scared of American elm bonsai because of Dutch elm disease concerns.  I have not experienced any problems with Am. elm bonsai, nor have I heard of any issues.  This is probably because of the natural life expectancy of bonsai, which may be not more than 10 years for any given specimen.  Not long enough to be impacted by a disease that can take many years to have its effect.

For the most part, American elm makes a fine bonsai subject.  They are hardy throughout North America, grow all season long, and have great characteristics.  Too seldom used, in my opinion.

Zach
 

John Kirby

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Re: American elms
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2014, 09:16 PM »
Dutch elm disease rarely affects small trees, the beetle vectors tend to have a vertical limit on feeding at or above 3 meters, aka 10-11 feet. So, you shouldn 't have issues with bonsai except in rare instances.
 

Sorce

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Re: American elms
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2014, 09:18 PM »
 I've seen Chinese Elms that small. But I didn't think an American Elm leaf would get that small.  

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I don't think spring is coming anyway!    :'(

 

Owen Reich

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Re: American elms
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2014, 09:59 PM »

[/quote]  This is probably because of the natural life expectancy of bonsai, which may be not more than 10 years for any given specimen.  Not long enough to be impacted by a disease that can take many years to have its effect.
[/quote]

It would be my hope that people intend on their bonsai living longer than 10 years.  I just saw some of Arthur Joura's American elm bonsai in Asheville the other day.  They have a growth rate faster than a trident maple IMO.  Thanks John for the info on the general height at which the beetles attack.
 

Jay

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Re: American elms
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2014, 05:58 AM »
Some one correct me here, but weren't there a couple of varieties of American Elms developed?
I think one was Valley Forge and there were others. These are resistant to Dutch Elm Disease.
Can anyone shed any light on this?
Jay