Author Topic: American Beech first styling  (Read 4320 times)

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
American Beech first styling
« on: October 12, 2010, 06:48 PM »
I collected this Beech in spring of 2009. It was growing pretty much vertically out of a red clay ravine wall that is almost vertical itself. After collecting and potting it up to keep the roots in soil I basically had to pot the tree with the trunk running horizontal to the ground. Come spring of this year I repotted it into this colander and positioned the trunk more upright and left it to leaf out and grow this season. As it leafed out this spring I pinched the tender growth in hopes of it producing a second flush of growth. That didn't happen but was curious to see what would happen. So I was left with this open airy tree. It did put out new growth at the end where I cut it back when collected. But no new growth on its only main original branch. First several pics shows what the tree looked like before working on it. As far as that nodule at the base it was a previous root. It will be removed come next yr.
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2010, 06:49 PM »
more before pics
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2010, 06:55 PM »
These pics shows where I wrapped an area of the branch to be bent severely with electrical tape. Yes you read that correctly...electrical tape. I start with sticky side out and wrapped out(or up and to the left) on the branch. Then twist the tape to where sticky side is in and wrap back where I started. Got this tip from Harry Harrington. It seems to work well with Beech as they have thin delicate bark. Plus the tape holds good to allow such drastic bends. The last 2 pics shows the start of the wiring process and how I anchored the branch to keep it in place. I used 4.5mm wire and seeing one was not going to hold it I applied a second still wouldn't hold. So I assume that if I used 6mm it wouldn't have held it either.
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2010, 06:57 PM »
more pics of the wiring job
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2010, 06:59 PM »
more pics of the wiring job. Also you see a towel used to cover up what will eventually be removed. Was trying to see the tree without all that at the top distracting me.
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2010, 07:00 PM »
last ones. Open to any comments good, bad, constructive, destructive :)
 

Zach Smith

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2010, 09:02 AM »
I like your beech, Steven.  But I'm curious about one thing: why the drastic bend on that branch that looks like your new apex?  Are you planning a literati style?

Keep us posted as this one develops.  I collected a sizeable specimen this past winter and have my eye on a few more for this coming winter.  Next year I hope to be able to post some shots that look like something.

Zach
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2010, 10:42 AM »
Zach if you see how the branch was prior to bending it was sort of headed in that direction. I did, as was discussed yesterday, think about trying to pull it up for an informal tree. I just didn't see it as functional(course the way it is now may not be functional to others) plus probably trying to bend it opposite of its natural curve, even with support, may have snapped the branch. I'm not expecting this to turn into anything spectacular. I know some on here look at me as stupid, crazy and/or ignorant. But these are my trees to do with what I wish. I'm not in this to please others. If I see how this is not working I can always strip it to a bare trunk and let it grow out for something else. If kept healthy they can re-sprout. Know what you mean by a collectible size. I have a 6 footer with a 6-7.5 inch trunk above the base that I need to figure out what to do with.
 

Zach Smith

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2010, 11:09 AM »
Zach if you see how the branch was prior to bending it was sort of headed in that direction. I did, as was discussed yesterday, think about trying to pull it up for an informal tree. I just didn't see it as functional(course the way it is now may not be functional to others) plus probably trying to bend it opposite of its natural curve, even with support, may have snapped the branch. I'm not expecting this to turn into anything spectacular. I know some on here look at me as stupid, crazy and/or ignorant. But these are my trees to do with what I wish. I'm not in this to please others. If I see how this is not working I can always strip it to a bare trunk and let it grow out for something else. If kept healthy they can re-sprout. Know what you mean by a collectible size. I have a 6 footer with a 6-7.5 inch trunk above the base that I need to figure out what to do with.
I hope you don't think I was being critical.  I was just curious about the plan.  As to pleasing others in bonsai, it's impossible to please everyone and darn near impossible to please any significant number of others.  My idea is we all do our own thing and if it pleases us then we've succeeded.  If you find a kindred spirit who appreciates your work, then that's cool too.

Zach
 

Steven

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
  • Kat-Su-Ra
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2010, 11:37 AM »
No I was not thinking that Zach at all. My apologies if you thought it was. If you like the crazy things I do that's cool. I know a literati style does not fit this species of tree at all but neither does a cascade style for a BC or Dawn Redwood(the former I don't have but have seen and the latter I do have).  :)
 

Zach Smith

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
Re: American Beech first styling
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2010, 11:47 AM »
No I was not thinking that Zach at all. My apologies if you thought it was. If you like the crazy things I do that's cool. I know a literati style does not fit this species of tree at all but neither does a cascade style for a BC or Dawn Redwood(the former I don't have but have seen and the latter I do have).  :)
Over the past 20+ years I've seen a lot of bonsai, and plenty that don't fit any particular mold but which "work."  I saw somewhere the term "treeness," and I love it.  If the bonsai has sufficient treeness then who's to question the artist's design.  I look for something that evokes in me a sense of "this looks real; I could find it out there somewhere."  But even so there's still that abstract quality to the whole endeavor, because like you say you just don't see cascade bald cypress out there.

Zach