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Author Topic: Acer Palmatum cuttings  (Read 664 times)
Dirty Nails
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USDA Hardiness: 6

« on: September 23, 2013, 12:57 PM »

Hi all,
 This past spring I took some new growth cuttings from some Japanese mountain maples. I had about an 80% success rate with the following method - Just after the leaves hardened off took cutting and stripped bark on bottom 1" with at least 1 node, dipped in root tone placed in 1/2 turface and 1/2 vermiculite, placed under 24 hour flourcent light indoors, covered with clear plastic container, misted and kept soil moist. In about 90 days they had rooted and are now growing well outside.

My question - is there a reliable way to take thicker cuttings (1/4 -1/2")? I have read that you can take them in late fall and they will root over the winter outdoors. I have a larger maountain maple in a container which I will be chopping in spring and wanted to get all starters I could off of it before the cut.

Thanks
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2013, 10:12 PM »

Eventually the size cutting becomes more likely an air layer candidate.  That size could work but never tried it.  Rooting maples is easy.  Overwintering tiny ones is tricky.  I'd protect them well.
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Dirty Nails
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USDA Hardiness: 6

« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2013, 11:53 AM »

Thanks Owen, I am going to pack the first year cuttings in some mulch in a protected corner for the winter.

Have you ever heard of taking cuttings in the fall? I have only seen it in a couple places on the net. So I am not sure if I believe it, but I am going to try. I am thinking of cutting them like normal and after applying the hormone wrap the base in spaghum moss and then plant in regular bonsai soil. Then just wait for spring. Nothing to lose in the name of science and experience.

I think you are right on the thicker cuttings. Air layer is almost gauranteed success so I think I'll go that way.

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Owen Reich
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« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2013, 03:37 PM »

Winter hardwood cuttings are old-school.  You have to stick quite a few to get good results. 
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