Author Topic: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin  (Read 3206 times)

Herman

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Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« on: April 14, 2014, 04:17 AM »
Hi Guys,

Here is another South African native...

This wild olive was purchased from a landscaping place as a untidy bush ontop of an interesting trunkline. I immediately started working on it, this was three and a bit years ago.

I planned to build a single trunk bunjin from it, but a bud popped on it base and i developed it into a second trunk, kind of a father son thing going there

I plan on doing some root work on it this coming spring, and get it into a wide shallow training container. I want this growing vigorously to close some large wounds. I had to make some big cuts...

any advice and comments welcome
pics to follow

kind regards
Herman
 

Herman

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2014, 04:24 AM »
Pics
 

Sorce

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2014, 06:20 AM »
Nice Olive Herman. I really like where it is going.

In 2d it seems the second branch maybe shading baby.
Can you push it back and bring the first branch forward a bit?
A little counterclockwise turn of the big trunk?

Also, it seems you should leave the foilage a bit more sparse at the tops.
To keep it from inverse taper and I think it would improve the current look.

?

Sorce





 

Herman

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2014, 07:06 AM »
Hi Sorce,

Thanks for the comment :)

the foliage is a bit thick on top...I will pull some foliage from inside the pad canopies this spring. I'm also planning to flatten the apex to make it wider and lower, but still rounded. the "son" was directly underneath the first branch on the right, but i wired it to be next to that pad in the 4 O'clock position if viewed from above. Kind of to suggest a father urging his hesitant son forward. I also want to lose the first branch on the left, and I want to approach graft a back branch on somewhere between the first right and current second left branch. I have tried before but the graft failed because of me testing how attached the graft was to the trunk  :-\, curiosity killed the bloody cat....., but at least it was my very first attempt and the graft was allowed too much free growth anyway, it bulged a lot at the grafting site, looked downright ugly. this year i will do it better.

this tree is a dog attack survivor btw :) it has survived two attacks by my X dog(7month old Great Dane)this year. 1st attack most of the ramification chewed off on the lower branches, second attack saw the tree almost bare rooted and left in the sun, it's still growing stronger than my yamadori olives  ;D

kind regards
Herman

 

jlushious

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2014, 09:58 AM »
Nice branch development! My only comment is that upon first view the father and son both look exactly the same - same curvature, branches in the same place etc. If you look much closer you can see more differences, but maybe look at trying to get more variation to give them each their own character.

Just my first impression - coming from a very non-expert!
 

Sorce

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2014, 09:59 PM »
Gotta love a tree that can take a beating.

Please document your grafting when the time comes!
 

Herman

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2014, 05:04 AM »
Nice branch development! My only comment is that upon first view the father and son both look exactly the same - same curvature, branches in the same place etc. If you look much closer you can see more differences, but maybe look at trying to get more variation to give them each their own character.

Just my first impression - coming from a very non-expert!

Hi J,

wouldn't you think that if in this composition; the father and son looked different that it would devide your attention and break up the unity? Which brings me to my next question; How different do you suggest I make them? I can make some subtle changes, and I am planning on making some. For starters the first left branch on the main tree is coming off. the corresponding branch on the second trunk stays. this will create an image of the father that has lost his youth, and the son that still has his youth. This will not disrupt the unity of the bonsai nor the story I'm trying to tell.

Best regards
Herman
 

Herman

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2014, 02:25 AM »
Epic fail...ok off to the firewood pile with this one, it seemed to have failed in the aesthetic department as a bonsai....

 ???

wonder what is wrong with it, and how I can improve it? o well no use asking I guess
 

Sorce

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2014, 06:19 AM »
Just let it grow. Those grafts should help. I dig your concept.

 

jlushious

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2014, 09:24 AM »
Well I made a comment, but your rationale for designing it that way made sense to me - keeping them as more of a unified pair. With the small changes you said you were going to make I think it will make it look better in my opinion.

Are you looking for more feedback from other people? Just be patient, we just had a long weekend holiday here in North America and it's growing season so people are busy!
 

ortizdhs

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 11:25 AM »
I think you should leave the first left branch on the big guy (longer and more downward) and remove the first left branch on the little guy. You will still have the first branch on the smaller tree. I see more balance that way. Just a humble opinion!

Ortiz
 

Gaffer

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2014, 04:42 PM »
Herman
Always keep in mind taper, taper, taper. Unless you wack that trunk you are going to have that trunk with no taper over the course of 5or 6 inches. And in the long run that will not be a good thing.
Qualicum Brian
 

Don Dunn

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2014, 03:58 AM »
I think the tree will look great in a couple of years. I would leave the left branch myself and let it grow to get some girth. That child tree should help to thicken up the base. I wonder if you could graft another younger olive into the base of the trunk to help with that and you would get a side benefit of more nebari.  I have put many post on here with no, I mean not one reply to my question so it's just that some times people don't have anything to add or just don't know. I'm sure I've made some dump  remarks at times but at least I try to help if I think I can.
 

Herman

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Re: Wild Olive (Olea Eropea var Afrikana) bunjin
« Reply #13 on: April 29, 2014, 09:45 AM »
I think you should leave the first left branch on the big guy (longer and more downward) and remove the first left branch on the little guy. You will still have the first branch on the smaller tree. I see more balance that way. Just a humble opinion!

Ortiz

this is something I have considered :) together with whacking the first right branch on the big tree. a possible future for it :D

I think the tree will look great in a couple of years. I would leave the left branch myself and let it grow to get some girth. That child tree should help to thicken up the base. I wonder if you could graft another younger olive into the base of the trunk to help with that and you would get a side benefit of more nebari.  I have put many post on here with no, I mean not one reply to my question so it's just that some times people don't have anything to add or just don't know. I'm sure I've made some dump  remarks at times but at least I try to help if I think I can.

this one shoots a lot from its base so no need to graft onto the base, I need to graft on a back branch up high on the "father". I may also get some buds a little higer up from the base on the lower trunk of the big guy, I could use these to get some taper, but how much taper would i need for a bunjin/literati style tree?

Herman
Always keep in mind taper, taper, taper. Unless you wack that trunk you are going to have that trunk with no taper over the course of 5or 6 inches. And in the long run that will not be a good thing.
Qualicum Brian

How much taper do you like to see on literati trees? aren't they supposed to have only slight taper? I don't think that a trunk chop is the best option for this tree, as it will set me back 5 years in developement. instead I can manage a few sacrifice branches to give me the slight taper i want, while I am refining the branch pads?

best regards
Herman