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Author Topic: Thuja occidentalis (Arborvitae) restyle  (Read 1673 times)
lsbonsai
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« on: July 09, 2013, 10:05 AM »

Hi everybody,

After some time lurking I've finally joined this forum, so this is my first post. There are some great discussions happening here and I like that there are a lot of cool projects with native trees. Where I live (Toronto), the two most popular collected species are Larix laricina (American Larch or Tamarack) and Thuja occidentalis (Eastern White Cedar or Arborvitae. I look forward to learning from you all, and sharing my work and experience where possible.

This is a new Thuja that I worked on the other day. The foliage is similar to hinoki, but like junipers they develop masses of buds in the crotches of the branches which need to be sorted out before wiring. For a tree with as many shoots as this one, thinning a branch takes me about the same time as wiring it.

Lots of people like the back of this tree, but drastic changes to the planting angle would be required to make it a feasible front. Still, it is something to consider for the future.

« Last Edit: July 09, 2013, 10:28 AM by lsbonsai » Logged

« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2013, 10:25 AM »

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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2013, 06:58 PM »

Looking good.  I can see why people like the back with all the deadwood, but I like the current front. Much more subtle.
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J

Dirk
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2013, 06:40 AM »

Very nice tree!
I like what you did with it!
Don't change the front; maybe make the dead stump a little more elegant.

Dirk
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andy graham
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« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2013, 05:53 PM »

I, too, Like the current front. But, I sometimes wonder if I'm not biased as a westerner and prefer the movement from left to right.
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bwaynef
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« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2013, 08:09 AM »

But, I sometimes wonder if I'm not biased as a westerner and prefer the movement from left to right.
I was once lambasted for suggesting similarly.  (If it warrants further discussion, maybe we should create a new thread.)
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lsbonsai
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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2013, 10:11 AM »

I, too, Like the current front. But, I sometimes wonder if I'm not biased as a westerner and prefer the movement from left to right.

Interesting idea. I have several slanting trees, most move left --> right... but not all. There may be some subconscious bias at work here. But what I think is more powerful is the basic design elements. The main reason that this tree has the current front is mainly because of branch placement and the lean of the tree.
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