Author Topic: Some type of pine, probably native to America  (Read 4776 times)

Herman

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Some type of pine, probably native to America
« on: August 12, 2014, 07:48 AM »
Hi guys  :),

wanted to share this little sapling I trained for the first time in autumn this year(March/April). some history on the tree; it was quite literally ripped out of the ground by my future father in law in November 2012, then wrapped in moist tissue paper and bagged in a sandwich zipper bag. He came home from work and handed me this little pine with badly torn tap root and only one fine root with a little white active tip on it....I told him it won't likely make it but I will try...I planted it in a mix of 90% large aquarium quartz(white) and 10% fine compost, placed it in the shade and watered it occasionally. It bounced back in about a month and I moved it to more sun and fertilized it. It grew so well that I decided to bend the trunk a bit this past autumn, looks like it will make a nice shohin later on...


kind regards
Herman
 

Herman

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2014, 07:50 AM »
Can someone also identify it for me please?

Herman
 

Dave Leppo

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2014, 09:53 AM »
it's got three needles per bunch from what I can see: Pitch pine or Ponderosa,

What part of the North America continent was it collected from?  Pitch pine is from the east, Ponderosa from west


I could be wrong; I'm not a professional nurseryman.
 

Sorce

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2014, 12:25 PM »
Sounds like it was pulled up in the South African part of N America. Lol

Looks like one of those Aussie half breed pines.

But I have no idea.

Nice work though. Especially the keeping it alive part!

Sorce

 

bwaynef

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2014, 02:17 PM »
Is there a discernible smell to the needles (when cut/broken/pinched?)  Have those needles been cut?
 

Herman

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2014, 01:11 AM »
Thanks for the replies guys :)

Dave it was collected from vanderbijl park in South Africa

Don't think it's a hybrid from Australia, only our logging companies would have access to those and this was collected very far from any logging plantation. Think the mother tree and the rest in that stand of trees was planted there as lanscaping back in the 70's?

No strong smell from the needles even if I break them by rubbing between my palms. It also doesn't seem to mind extreme heat, and did the worst of all my pines with the cold this winter, some of the needles turned purple....coldest was minus 6 celcius which isn't very cold relative to the temps you guys got in your winter.

Reason I ask is I'm atm only cutting out the strong candles and leaving the weak ones throughout the tree, and cutting the needles shorter to try and control the growth to get some ramification gowing. I want to discern if the isn't a better way...also I dont want to decandle and knock the tree back to the stone ages

Kind regards
Herman
 

Anthony

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2014, 03:28 AM »
Herman.

it reminds me of a Honduran pine.
Good Day
Anthony
 

Herman

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2014, 06:59 AM »
Hi Anthony :)

I have no idea, It might just as well be, It's slowly starting to move now

kind regards
Herman
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2014, 06:07 PM »
Pinus radiata - Monterey Pine - often is used as a landscape plant where it is warm enough to be grown. Or much less likely it could be one of the many, many similar species from Mexico. The country of Mexico has more species of pine than any other country in the world, more species than USA, China or the entire EU. It is a hot spot of biodiversity for pines. Most are subtropical in their requirements.

Radiata is very likely because it was widely planted for landscape use and for timber in tropical & sub tropical zones and it does not tolerate cold very well at all. Also the "hybrid" pines used for timber trees are not sterile mules -  they can reseed themselves, and become an invasive weed, well "weedy" is maybe not correct - but they can naturalize. Being hybrids there will be a lot of variation and they won't fit into a single species definition exactly. The fact that were it was growing was away from any timber plantations does not eliminate the hybrids as a possibility. Seed does get around.

To really figure it out for certain you will need a sample of needles, twig, a mature cone or two and if possible a sample of fresh pollen cones as they are shedding pollen. Armed with these you will be able to sort it out by consulting the taxonomic keys.

You might be able to cheat if a University near you has a genetics lab that will do DNA sequencing and compare its DNA to the various on line DNA databases. Unfortunately DNA analysis will cost a minimum of $150 usd or more depending on how up to date the local lab is. Newer labs can do it cheaper with the new automated sequencers. If it has to be done the older fashioned way, we are talking thousands per sample.
 

Herman

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2014, 10:07 AM »
Thanks for the reply Leo :)

It could be radiata, I also wouldn't rule out pitch pine as a possibility.  I went throu a whole lot of pics on the web and it lookes very similar to pitchpine candles that are extending. But we will probably only know for sure when it grows up a little.  The weather in vanderbijl park ain't really subtropical...we get minus ten celcius true temperature. .zone 9a or something like that. So somewhere between sub tropical and temperate

Thanks for the help
Kind regards
Herman
 

J.Kent

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Re: Some type of pine, probably native to America
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2014, 10:27 AM »
It is a Loblolly pine Pinus tadea.  I've read these were brought in to many southern hemisphere nations as a commercial timber/paper crop and that they've gotten to be pests in some areas.