Author Topic: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?  (Read 5246 times)

somegeek

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Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« on: September 28, 2009, 01:57 AM »
Looking for some guidance on where I should go with this Shimpaku.  The four view is all four sides rotated counter clockwise if you were looking from the top.


Here's the main growth on the tree. 






The main lower trunk structure on this tree looks like two Y shapes one Y off the main trunk line.

I'd like to wire this up sooner than later to get it going in the right direction.  The finished product years down the road will be ~15" or so in height.  Would I keep the main four branches or trim this back to a single branch off the main trunk line with the main trunk(remove one branch from each Y)?  Looking at an informal upright I think.

Appreciate any input!

somegeek

P.S. This was one of the first starters I purchased.  I was anxious to pot one up to look at essentially.  :)  Since then I've purchased five more small $10 tree starters and they've been placed into larger pots with a sifted pine bark/oil-dry mix around them and then placed into the ground for ease of watering and to help minimize heating of the pots in the sun.  Gonna let them grow a year or so before pondering/nailing down a wiring plan for them I think.
 

King Kong

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2009, 08:23 AM »
15 inches in height is the key. If you want a trunk that scales in well you need to grow, no cutting in my opinion.

__gary
 

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2009, 08:24 AM »
somegeek,

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somegeek

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2009, 10:34 AM »
Dangit... and I now recall you mentioning this.  Pics attached and thanks!
 

somegeek

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2009, 01:09 AM »
15 inches in height is the key. If you want a trunk that scales in well you need to grow, no cutting in my opinion.

__gary

Understood... should I be wiring though for the uprights?  Leave other branches on as sacrifices until I hit 15" and then go from there to wire more and shape/trim?

somegeek
 

King Kong

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2009, 06:54 AM »
 It would be my opinion to grow and train at least three plants Somegeek. Seeing is believing.


#1 Wire and style pronto. No hesitation. Pick a style you want chop off what you don't want and do it.

#2 Three year grin and bare it plan. Have an idea of final look. Grow in larger pot. Leave some sacrifice branches and fertilize the dog out of it with a final look in mind.

#3 Five year or more plan if you can handle it. Grow in ideal soil in maybe an escape pot. Don't dare cut a branch. The more stuff grown on top the bigger the trunk. Maybe plant with initial proper angle, fertilize and the hard part...just let it grow. If you can't take it anymore, wire #1 again.

__gary  
 

somegeek

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2009, 02:09 PM »
It would be my opinion to grow and train at least three plants Somegeek. Seeing is believing.


#1 Wire and style pronto. No hesitation. Pick a style you want chop off what you don't want and do it.

#2 Three year grin and bare it plan. Have an idea of final look. Grow in larger pot. Leave some sacrifice branches and fertilize the dog out of it with a final look in mind.

#3 Five year or more plan if you can handle it. Grow in ideal soil in maybe an escape pot. Don't dare cut a branch. The more stuff grown on top the bigger the trunk. Maybe plant with initial proper angle, fertilize and the hard part...just let it grow. If you can't take it anymore, wire #1 again.

__gary  

I'd read that newbies should purchase multiple starters so they don't love one to death.  :)

I have four Shimpaku starters, some ficus and a few Hinokis.  I'd like to tinker with one or a few but I'm not abject to letting a few simply grow.  I've got the majority of them in escape pots in our backyard for ease of watering and to let a few really grow.  I like you're suggestions.  Thanks for the reply.  :)
 

shimsuki

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2009, 06:08 PM »
I would not even consider putting the thing in a bonsai pot yet, I have made that mistake. Plant it into a 1-3 gallon plastic nursery pot. Like king kong said, I would wire and remove about 15% of the unneeded foliage. Put some curve into it and let it grow.

If you update your profile so we can see where you live we may be able to assist you further.
 

somegeek

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2009, 11:00 AM »
I would not even consider putting the thing in a bonsai pot yet, I have made that mistake. Plant it into a 1-3 gallon plastic nursery pot. Like king kong said, I would wire and remove about 15% of the unneeded foliage. Put some curve into it and let it grow.

If you update your profile so we can see where you live we may be able to assist you further.

Zone 8a-b here.

Thanks for the advice... I will move this back to a 1 gallon escape pot setup in my backyard. :)
 

joe cervantes

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2009, 07:34 PM »
Hope this isnt a stupid question, but what exactly is an "escape pot"?
 

somegeek

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2009, 09:58 PM »
Only dumb question is the one left unasked.  :)

Basically you put the potted plant/tree in the soil.  Makes it easier to remove at a later time if that's what you intend to do.  The pot is mostly under the soil line so it doesn't dry out as easily and is a bit protected from the elements.  Also a bit more aesthetically pleasing.

Can also do this to limit the spread of invasive species plants.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2009, 10:37 PM by somegeek »
 

joe cervantes

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2009, 10:51 PM »
Very true some geek. Thanks for the reply. Once you put the escape pot into the soil, doesnt that limit the roots from growing. Trying to understand it. Thanks, Joe
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2009, 10:53 PM »
Absolutely correct Geek. You may or may not need an escape pot, in the big pot with lots of water and fertilizer (use osmocote or miracle gro), these little trees will grow pretty quick. John
 

somegeek

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Re: Shimpaku guidance for a newbie?
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2009, 11:15 PM »
Very true some geek. Thanks for the reply. Once you put the escape pot into the soil, doesnt that limit the roots from growing. Trying to understand it. Thanks, Joe

The limitation can be overcome... when the tree is starting to become root bound, place the tree into a larger pot.

Good info here:

http://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basics%20Bonsai%20Myths%20Overpotting.htm

Quote
"The best way to achieve fastest growth is to shift (repot) just as soon as the plant produces an intact rootball. This is standard nursery practice and a well established principle. If you do this, you don't have to disturb the rootball or prune the top, thus there is little or no shock and it can be done at any time of the year. Bonsai practices somewhat complicate this, since we want specific root configurations, but for plants in training it still holds.

Ok, what's an intact rootball? An intact rootball is when you can knock the nursery can or pot off the root ball and it won't fall apart."

somegeek