Author Topic: Rocky Mountain Juniper Starters  (Read 2167 times)

majohnson

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Rocky Mountain Juniper Starters
« on: November 10, 2010, 11:33 PM »
After reading about using local plants for bonsai, I ordered 3 Rocky Mountain Junipers since I live in northern Colorado. They are seedlings with 1/2" plus trunks, 28" to 30" tall with tons of little branches.

I,ve seen several yamadori made into bonsai but none from nursery stock. They seem user friendly, any know problems or things I should watch out for. 
 

shimsuki

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Re: Rocky Mountain Juniper Starters
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2010, 12:13 AM »
After reading about using local plants for bonsai, I ordered 3 Rocky Mountain Junipers since I live in northern Colorado. They are seedlings with 1/2" plus trunks, 28" to 30" tall with tons of little branches.

I,ve seen several yamadori made into bonsai but none from nursery stock. They seem user friendly, any know problems or things I should watch out for. 

The main reason people use Rocky Mountain Juniper is the incredible collected trunks they can get. A lot of Rocky Mountain foliage in unattractive compared to shimpaku, and you will even hear of people grafting shimpaku foliage to bad rocky mountain foliage.

I guess my point is if you are going to develop bonsai from seedlings, why not use a juniper with a better foliage?



Just my thoughts (doesn't mean their right),

Shim
 

october

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Re: Rocky Mountain Juniper Starters
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2010, 03:35 PM »
Hello majohnson..shimsuki gave some good advice here.. The trunks and bark on the RM's is outstanding,. However ,the foliage is sporadic and string like. I have seen a few at the nursery, even small ones have incredible tunks and bark, but this long, stringy foliage.

As far as for bonsai.. If they are only about 1/2 inch in diamter seedlings. It will probably be about 4-6 years before they can really be made into "on it's way" to being a nice bonsai.

However, there may be something that you can do to actually get some nice shohins in the meantime. I do not know how well it will work with Rocky M's, but I have seen it done with shimpaku. You get a young plant, as you descibed and you wire it up into a crazy, confinded design. Then you plant it is a strainer or cauldron like container for great drainage. This will make the tree grow pretty fast as thicken up quickly. After the tree has set, then you can shari. Within 4 or so years, you can have a nice small, but older looking bonsai. I have seen this techniqure done by, I believe, Mario Komsta.

I hope this was helpful. If you do try this technique, post some pics of your work.

Rob
 

John Kirby

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Re: Rocky Mountain Juniper Starters
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2010, 05:25 PM »
I will agree that the trunks of the collected trees are the main reason to use RMJ for bonsai. I alsobelieve that those of us who live in hot or humidclimates do better when these trees are grafted. However, these trees will be in northern Colorado where the foliage can be quite attractive and compact- and a place where shimpaku can really struggle. So, all in all, it might work out to be a nice little project. 
 

majohnson

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Re: Rocky Mountain Juniper Starters
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2010, 02:37 PM »
Thanks for the input.

After reading in a forum about using local plants, I figured I would try doing RMJ. At $8 each, I don't have that much to loose. I'm still not sure even what I am going to do with them, so I welcome any styling suggestions

I have several other junipers, so it's just something different.