Author Topic: Picea engelmanni  (Read 1713 times)

JRob

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Picea engelmanni
« on: July 14, 2014, 10:39 PM »
Good Evening All,

One of the workshops at Nashville this past weekend was an Engelmann Spruce given by Jim Doyle of Nature's Way. The material was collected 3-5 years ago by Randy Knight. They were estimated to be between 50 - 150 years old and were collected in CO at the 6500' - 8000' level in the Rocky Mountains. They will not be taken out of their current pots for another 2 growing seasons. Planted in Pumice with original tuft intact. Initial styling was done during the workshop and if time permitted some wiring. In my estimation they were a steal at $220 with instruction, yet even at that the class did not fill. I have done several workshops with Jim and been to his Bonsai Nursery twice. He is a great teacher but more importantly a wonderful man. IF you ever get a chance do not pass up studying with him. Here are some pictures from the class. My tree is the last picture. You can see it in the first on the left prior to any work. It will be wired with Hagedorn in the fall. JRob
 

coh

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Re: Picea engelmanni
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2014, 10:48 PM »
I have one of Jim's engelmanns. Picked it up about 3 years ago, haven't done any styling work yet except for some candle cutting. This year it was repotted and the roots worked a fair amount (for the first time). It has responded well and should be ready for more serious work this fall or in the spring.

Can you share any cultural/styling advice from the class? I'm especially interested what they had to say about wiring. Some people tell me they should only be wired in the fall, others say you can do it any time. Also, what about candle cutting, backbudding, etc - anything you can share?

Will be looking forward to seeing your tree wired.

Chris
 

JRob

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Re: Picea engelmanni
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2014, 05:54 AM »
Chris, Since this tree is in pumice, it will require lots of water. I'll use organic fertilizer throughout the spring and fall and with hold all in the heat of summer. I'll also foliar feed with fish and kelp alternating weekly. It will be kept in full sun through mid-May then partial shade (early morning sun) till Sept. I'll pinch 1/2 if the new growth in the spring. Bud back in the interior is not prolific. All the branches will will be wired down in a graceful drooping pattern to give the impression of having been laden with snow over the decades. SOme shari and jin with eventually be done to give the impression of age and lightening damage. I will tray it like my Ezo and wire in the fall. I do not want to run the risk of slipping the bark and in the heat of summer doing damage that can not recover by the time it goes dormant. The species requires wire to be on for a long time to get the branches to hold in place. Let's see some pictures of your tree please. JRob
 

coh

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Re: Picea engelmanni
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2014, 01:01 PM »
Thanks! I will dig up some older pics and post (probably in a separate thread). The tree is currently so full/bushy that you can't really see the underlying structure as well as you could a couple of years ago.

Chris

Chris, Since this tree is in pumice, it will require lots of water. I'll use organic fertilizer throughout the spring and fall and with hold all in the heat of summer. I'll also foliar feed with fish and kelp alternating weekly. It will be kept in full sun through mid-May then partial shade (early morning sun) till Sept. I'll pinch 1/2 if the new growth in the spring. Bud back in the interior is not prolific. All the branches will will be wired down in a graceful drooping pattern to give the impression of having been laden with snow over the decades. SOme shari and jin with eventually be done to give the impression of age and lightening damage. I will tray it like my Ezo and wire in the fall. I do not want to run the risk of slipping the bark and in the heat of summer doing damage that can not recover by the time it goes dormant. The species requires wire to be on for a long time to get the branches to hold in place. Let's see some pictures of your tree please. JRob
 

base797

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Re: Picea engelmanni
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2014, 04:02 PM »
Hi guys,
I have about 50 engelmann in my garden currently and have probably collected twice that many over the years.

 JRob, the only thing I would say, from my experience, is that you will get better back budding from cutting more than half of the new shoot as they harden off. I cut new growth back as far as possible while still leaving just a small (think 1/8-1/4") amount of this years growth. I have found that if you leave enough room on the current years growth for bud to form on, that's where you will get them. By cutting back even farther, you can encourage advantageous buds on older wood, is what I have experienced anyway. Here's a couple of mine, still waiting for styling and real pots though.

Patrik
 

Sorce

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Re: Picea engelmanni
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2014, 04:59 AM »
Nice stuff Guys. ;D
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Picea engelmanni
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2014, 07:09 PM »
really nice