Author Topic: Monterey Pine  (Read 2997 times)

John Kirby

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Monterey Pine
« on: February 18, 2014, 08:00 PM »
Old Monterey Pine rescued from a challenging situation. This tree has now been started on the road to recovery. Young Monterey Pines have smooth bark , this pine has bark at least 3/4" thick. Removed from old pot, 1/2 bare rooted and then placed in new Japanese pot . Tree is over. 4' tall.
 

Dan W.

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2014, 11:46 PM »
Nice! It looks incredibly ancient with that bark. Is Monterey pine used very often for bonsai?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2014, 11:32 AM »
Dan, with these trees being native to Coastal California, there are a number of them in California, I have not seen elsewhere, but I haven't been looking either. This is an old tree. A few posts on their culture, the Kinoshita piece is on one of the best developers of P radiata bonsai. http://nichigobonsai.com/tag/monterey-pine/
 

Chrisl

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2014, 12:00 PM »
John, I've never quite understood the ability to bare root half at a time, when I've read time and time again not to bare root evergreens.  If that's such a hard rule, how does the tree allow half, but not the whole rootball to be bare rooted?
 

Dan W.

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2014, 01:01 PM »
Thanks for all of the info John. They look like a fun pine to work with. I doubt they'd do well in Wyoming though.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2014, 03:02 PM »
John, I've never quite understood the ability to bare root half at a time, when I've read time and time again not to bare root evergreens.  If that's such a hard rule, how does the tree allow half, but not the whole rootball to be bare rooted?

While we wait on Kirby's response, I'll throw this out there:  The ½ that's left alone is there to support the tree while also reinoculating the other ½ with the all-important Mycorrhiza. 
 

John Kirby

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2014, 04:16 PM »
I did respond, must be in the ether. I think wayne has the important pieces.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2014, 11:02 AM »
Darn ether!  Thanks Wayne, that does make sense.

Chris
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2014, 11:09 PM »
Pinus radiata, are not winter hardy north of zone 8, or maybe 7b. They are a true sub-tropical to nearly fully tropical pine. More than half of Japan is too cold to grow Monterey Pine outdoors in winter. This is likely why they are not common as bonsai outside their native range, coastal California. They are widely used as timber production trees in tropical and subtropical plantations around the globe. I think those from tropical areas that are having trouble with Japanese Black Pines should try the Monterey Pine.
 

akeppler

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2014, 09:00 PM »
Here is a  M. pine of Kinoshita.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 09:04 PM by akeppler »
 

Jason E

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2014, 09:23 PM »
that is a killer looking pine! thanks for posting.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Monterey Pine
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2014, 07:58 AM »
Al , Thanks. Kinoshita's name always comes up when you discuss Monterey Pine in California.