Author Topic: JBP airlayer  (Read 11932 times)

Steven

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #30 on: October 18, 2012, 03:34 PM »
Wayne you remember this pine?
 

Steven

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #31 on: October 18, 2012, 10:30 PM »
Here it is now. The pic showing close up of the trunk and 3 lowest branches I am thinking of removing those branches. Where the trunk bends to the left is a branch I will make the first branch. The pine kind of flat tops at the apex.
 

Steven

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #32 on: October 18, 2012, 10:36 PM »
Here it is thinned and the 3 lowest branches pruned back. I will use them as anchoring points to pull branches down. Afterwards I may use one or two as jins. The part of the trunk that had the airlayer  is slowly barking up.
 

Dirk

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #33 on: December 12, 2012, 02:11 PM »
Steven,

Looks like a good tree to me!!
Good thing it came out well out of an experiment!

I see you still got it in its pondbasket.
Do you actually see the points of roots coming trough the mess?

Dirk
 

bwaynef

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2012, 03:12 PM »
I hate the airlayer didn't work, but I still like it.  Nice work on it!
 

Steven

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2012, 08:02 PM »
Dirk,
Only place I have seen roots coming out is the bottom. This tree is in need of a repot. Should've been done 2 yrs ago, coming up on 3 yrs, but unforeseen events has prevented me from doing so. If things go good next month then I can repot in spring.

Wayne,
All we could've done is try and we did. No harm no foul lol. I didn't get any buds popping after decandling. Course way late on a repot and being thrown over a fence hasn't helped it any. I have wired it some but not fully. I see a flat top in this one but I may just be off since all that has gone wrong for me and can't see the tree another way.
 

Don Dunn

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2012, 09:28 PM »
Hello Every one
  I had purchased a JBP in a 5 gallon pot awhile back with out knowing what I was doing. I intended on trying to Bonsai it however  I noticed it's nodes are way to far apart. And it had lots of low branches at the base and not more for about a foot up. It has not been  trained at all for Bonsai. I learned something already about purchasing trees for Bonsai.  Now  I am thinking I will either try  to get my money back or possibly do some air layering to get some nice starts. It has about four limbs that if separated would  already have pretty good structure. Any other ideas with this bad purchase.
 If I air layer it how many of the limbs could I do at a time with out hurting the main tree to much.
 

John Kirby

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #37 on: December 18, 2012, 09:41 PM »
Just cut it down, it has potential to sprout all over and give you branches in places that you may want.

Sp how does that work, you buy a tree, you keep it around for a while, learn you didn't quite have as good a sense of what you need as you thought you did, then you take it back and expect your money back? I will have to think about that one for a while.
 

nathanbs

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #38 on: December 18, 2012, 10:07 PM »
Its impossible to tell from that one photo what's going on. Try taking some better photos. But as John said you can chop it and induce some back budding.
 

Adair M

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #39 on: December 18, 2012, 10:32 PM »
John,

About taking trees back... At the workshop I gave on Sunday, one guy brought in a JWP pine he had bought a year or so ago from the shop, Plant City Bonsai.  My workshop was geared primarily towards JBP, but I covered the basics of all pine care, too.  Anyway, this guys JWP, a graft, naturally, had a whirl of heavy branches right about 1 inch above the graft, which was very low,almost at the soil line.  I encouraged him to pick one of those and we could pull it up to make a twin trunk, and we would start removing the others.  He didn't like that idea.

Anyway, as the workshop went on, he became more and more disenchanted with his tree.  Especially after he took a look at some of my JBPs I brought in.  He ended up trading the JWP back in for a JBP.

I had about a dozen folk at my workshop.  At the beginning, I asked them if they liked JBP or JWP better.  Almost all said JWP.  I asked why.  "The needles are shorter."  So I said, if I could show you two JBP I've had in training for two years with shorter needles than your JWP, would you like them better?  They said, yes, but you can't do it.

Then I pulled out two JBP with 1 inch needles.

I had their attention after that.

Except for one guy who insisted that pretty much everything I was saying was wrong.  He said he was a student of Warren Hill, and he was sticking to his methods.

 

Chrisl

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #40 on: December 19, 2012, 12:16 PM »
LOL Adair...there's always ONE in a workshop who...well, you know hehe

Sounds like you had a good workshop!  Congrats!
 

Don Dunn

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #41 on: December 20, 2012, 12:23 AM »
Thank you guys for the help. I put on another picture I had showing the bottom of the trunk.  Cutting it back is what my first instinct was but I was still a little nervous about doing such a drastic move to a tree. I thought I would cut it to the first set of branches about 1 foot up from the soil. Should I wait until spring or just get it done now?  I need to pull a tone more needles also but I don't want to over stress the poor tree with to much work at one time. I asked some one down at the club if I should remove the candles at this point and they suggested I wait until spring.
I watched one of Ryan Neil's demonstrations on JBP's and he said the first thing you should do when you first get a JBP is to remove all the candles and pluck the needles on the whole tree to a uniform consistency all over the tree. So I am a little confused about the candles.
I wasn't sure how much if any back budding I would get on a JBP so I am relieved about that.  A little bit of knowledge goes a long way.  So, thank you for sharing with me a bit of your knowledge, it is greatly appreciated.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2012, 12:39 AM by iamdunn4 »
 

Adair M

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #42 on: December 20, 2012, 09:50 AM »
Needle pulling is primarily a "refinement" technique.  Your tree needs to GROW.  To develop a heavy trunk.  True, you might chop the trunk,and let a new leader take over to put in some movement.  But this tree does not need to have any needles pulled.
 

bwaynef

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #43 on: December 20, 2012, 10:17 AM »
I watched one of Ryan Neil's demonstrations on JBP's and he said the first thing you should do when you first get a JBP is to remove all the candles and pluck the needles on the whole tree to a uniform consistency all over the tree.

There is an appropriate season for this work, but I agree with others here who've mentioned that this tree needs growth (after chopping it back).  Go ahead and cut it back and start developing sections of the trunk.  Maintain low branching unless and until you are CERTAIN that you won't need it (AND that it is about to cause a problem!).  Chopping it (as drastically as it needs to be chopped) will almost certainly induce backbudding throughout what is left of the tree.
 

Steven

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Re: JBP airlayer
« Reply #44 on: December 21, 2012, 10:25 PM »
Nothing like threadjacking LOL. Laugh people :} Seriously, if one of my threads helps someone in their journey of bonsai I'm all for it. I'm with everyone here on advice. Cut it back when time, feed well, get in a good open mix. Those were not listed in order so please don't follow them in order. If my "Pinezilla" thread is still on this site that would give an idea of cutting back hard to induce budding. But also it tells what not to do...push the tree too much.