Author Topic: Flat-top Pines  (Read 6857 times)

johng

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Re: Flat-top Pines
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2009, 11:20 AM »

BC Flattop style could be classified in the literati style with little trouble, but it's not an artistically-driven style, per se. It's mostly species-specific.

Hey Mark,  I wonder if you might speak more to the section I have underline.  I think I wanted to take it differently than perhaps you had intended it.  I think you are just suggesting that "in general" most species of trees could be potentially found growing in any of the recognized bonsai styles.  Whereas, the Flat-top style is mostly associated with one species thus its could never really be accepted as a general style.  I would agree with this and then surmise personally that the Flat-top style is simply one of the many types of literati and does not justify its own general style....but who am I to make those decisions:)

I would like to suggest that the real difference between Bald Cypress and other trees is in the flared/fluted root base.  In my experience,  a lot of trees, when give the same growing circumstances taken on a very similar form to the Flat-top Bald Cypress.  The pines suggested by Noissee are a perfect example.  We have just a couple areas in South Carolina where the trees are old enough to really demonstrate this form well but I will also try to get some pics this afternoon and share them. 

Interesting discussion:)
John
 

noissee

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Re: Flat-top Pines
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2009, 01:05 PM »
Here are a couple examples along I-10. There was another that I couldn't really stop and photograph, and the first one really looks better from the opposite direction...but I didn't want to cause an accident.



 

Bonsai Study Group Admin

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Re: Flat-top Pines
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2009, 01:14 PM »
Please take a moment to read the Welcome thread.

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rockm

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Re: Flat-top Pines
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2009, 01:22 PM »
"I would agree with this and then surmise personally that the Flat-top style is simply one of the many types of literati and does not justify its own general style....but who am I to make those decisions:)

I would like to suggest that the real difference between Bald Cypress and other trees is in the flared/fluted root base.  In my experience,  a lot of trees, when give the same growing circumstances taken on a very similar form to the Flat-top Bald Cypress."

The flat top "style" shows up naturally in many trees, including pines and deciduous trees--It's called "Pierneef" in South Africa and used on acacia and other savanna species. However, the BC has a specific association and affinity for the style, so yeah, it could be thought of as "just one" of many types of literati, but it's also more than that when used on this species...I would also say flared roots come on many species. I've seen Carolina Hornbeam with extremely fluted nebari, just as good ficus have. It's not a signature for BC, but one more notable feature of a truly remarkable species.

Some of the best BC bonsai don't have much fluting at the base. Vaughn Banting's Flattop BC at the National Arb. has rather weak nebari --if it has any at all--compared to say Guy Guidry's BC in the same location.

 

noissee

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Re: Flat-top Pines
« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2009, 03:23 PM »
Sorry, I'll try to fix the pix tomorrow morning.
 

Attila Soos

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Re: Flat-top Pines
« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2009, 01:17 PM »
Old Aleppo pines are very flat (similarly, almost all pines of the Holy Land - P. pinea, P. brutia eldarica develop similar shapes when old).
 I am working on one, to convey such an image.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2009, 01:20 PM by Attila Soos »