Pages: 1 [2] 3
Author Topic: Decandle what if?  (Read 3522 times)
MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
*****
Posts: 1374
USDA Hardiness: 6b



WWW
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2012, 06:10 PM »

If it were mine I would repot in late February or early March into good soil.  Bare-root the front half if needed.  Really not going to know what's in there until you're in there.

I would probably do some fall cleanup now.  Remove 2 year old needles.  Refresh the top ~inch of soil.

May I ask from where you acquired the tree?  It looks like it was most likely imported.  The pot looks like a reproduction pot that Brussel's sells, and their soil is awful.  It could be that since importation it wasn't treated properly for optimum root growth (ex: roots trimmed flush, poor soil, not enough fertilizer, etc) and it only had enough reserves to push buds last year.  Get it into good soil and growing well next year.

Healthy roots make for healthy JBP, usually.
Logged

J

Jay tupelo
Legit New User
*
Posts: 29
USDA Hardiness: South

« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2012, 07:07 PM »

what can i say you hit it on a nail. Yes its an import yes the soil is bad and yes ill take your advise and repot, yes its from brussels but lets make it live a few more years for my enjoyment thanks more comments welcomed
Logged

John Kirby
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 2108
USDA Hardiness: 6



« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2012, 08:26 PM »

It is a nice tree, you can fix it pretty easily. If Matsu isn't doing workshops, be sure to look at Boon's repotting video, maybe look up Gary Woods, a really good Bonsai guy.
Logged

MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
*****
Posts: 1374
USDA Hardiness: 6b



WWW
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2012, 08:55 PM »

Will probably be first and/or second weekend in March.
Logged

J

Jay tupelo
Legit New User
*
Posts: 29
USDA Hardiness: South

« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2012, 11:16 PM »

I'll try to repot in boon mix by fed hopfully all goes well wish me luck
Logged

coh
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 124
USDA Hardiness: 6a

« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2012, 11:09 AM »

May I ask from where you acquired the tree?  It looks like it was most likely imported.  The pot looks like a reproduction pot that Brussel's sells, and their soil is awful. 

Do you know what components they use in their soil? Is it like the stuff in the "bad soil = bad roots" thread started by boon?

Chris
Logged

Chrisl
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 887
USDA Hardiness: USDA Hardiness 5b

« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2012, 11:37 AM »

Chris, the JBP I got also from Brussels is also in pretty organic soil.  Grew extr. well this yr despite having wet feet too much despite holes drilled in the sides and keeping it tilted.  I'd love to leave it in the 5g container as I just did it's first major styling this yr. and would like to keep the momentum forward.  So I have to decide to repot this spring, or just use rebar and fill in aggregate 2x/yr and hope I get it draining better.  

Boy Matsu, you really know your sources! Wink)
Logged

MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
*****
Posts: 1374
USDA Hardiness: 6b



WWW
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2012, 12:04 PM »

Brussel's soil is great for them, in that it retains a ton of water, and fertilizer, and limits their water bill, limits the time spent watering, payment for someone to hand water, or infrastructure to automate watering.

My biggest gripe is that they use the same soil on their high dollar trees (which have gotten even higher and harder to come by in recent years). These trees are then purchased by the unsuspecting and uneducated. I say uneducated as I feel that the vast majority of clubs do their members a disservice by not teaching good curriculum, whether for lack of knowledge, lack of effort, or good old American "I know better than you". 

Before I started studying with Boon our clubs resident line expert advocated using electric hedge trimmers on pines. In recent years he has proclaimed pines won't grow in or area.  Could be that his soil sucks. Could be that he's still working out of a book from the '70s.

/rant

Logged

J

Jay tupelo
Legit New User
*
Posts: 29
USDA Hardiness: South

« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2012, 07:04 PM »

Hey guys the sad thing is I've had the tree for going on the 2nd year and I have watered and fert heavy when needed during growing season. Hope that when I change to boon mix this feb it's notsobad wish me luck ill keep you informed
Logged

Chrisl
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 887
USDA Hardiness: USDA Hardiness 5b

« Reply #24 on: November 20, 2012, 07:47 PM »

Good Luck Jay.  It's a great looking tree!

Matsu, Thanks for the rant.  That makes more sense now knowing that.  I'll get it in some good soil next spring. 
Logged

Dirk
Full Forum Member
***
Posts: 116
USDA Hardiness: 8

« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2012, 01:44 PM »

or good old American "I know better than you". 

John,

You are mistaken here: It's Dutch!

Jay,

I wish you best of luck. Its looks like a good tree. Can't be to carefull and these guys really know what they are talking about!

Dirk
Logged

boon
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 280



WWW
« Reply #26 on: December 31, 2012, 12:43 PM »

If it were mine I would repot in late February or early March into good soil.  Bare-root the front half if needed.  Really not going to know what's in there until you're in there.

I would probably do some fall cleanup now.  Remove 2 year old needles.  Refresh the top ~inch of soil.

May I ask from where you acquired the tree?  It looks like it was most likely imported.  The pot looks like a reproduction pot that Brussel's sells, and their soil is awful.  It could be that since importation it wasn't treated properly for optimum root growth (ex: roots trimmed flush, poor soil, not enough fertilizer, etc) and it only had enough reserves to push buds last year.  Get it into good soil and growing well next year.

Healthy roots make for healthy JBP, usually.

i recommend to do as John said.  my dvd is for the tree that is already in good soil.  when you run into bad soil you need to bare root half and get it into a new soil.  do not decandle the year you do first half bare root.  it is safer to let the tree grow one year without decandle.  2 years later remove the other half of the old soil.  this technique has saved a lot of bonsai.  including the oldest black pine in the US.
Logged

Chrisl
Hero Forum Member
*****
Posts: 887
USDA Hardiness: USDA Hardiness 5b

« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2012, 04:09 PM »

That's what John K. also told me the same Boon. 

Oldest JBP in US is that huge old, 400?yrs, BP that was given to US for exhibition in early 1900s?  I saw a picture of that the other day in an old Bonsai Today.  If not the same tree, this one WAS impressive!
Logged

boon
Sr. Forum Member
****
Posts: 280



WWW
« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2012, 04:27 PM »

That's what John K. also told me the same Boon.  

Oldest JBP in US is that huge old, 400?yrs, BP that was given to US for exhibition in early 1900s?  I saw a picture of that the other day in an old Bonsai Today.  If not the same tree, this one WAS impressive!

I wrote the article on wiring and restyled that jbp. It is now at golden state bonsai collection north in Oakland. I heard that it came in in 1916. For pan pacific exhibition in San Francisco.

I did not published the pic after it had problem. and I had to repot it in Feb 1999.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 04:31 PM by boon » Logged

Jay tupelo
Legit New User
*
Posts: 29
USDA Hardiness: South

« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2013, 09:58 AM »

thank you, the plan is to repot half and not touch the other half. so the end product will be half boon mix and the other the same soil. hopfuly that will work for now. any suggestions welcomed
Logged

Pages: 1 [2] 3
Print
 
Jump to: