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Author Topic: Bristlecone Pines?  (Read 3639 times)
M. Frary
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« on: May 06, 2013, 11:19 PM »

  Hello. I just bought a Bristle cone Pine the other day and was wondering if someone knew anything about them. I checked them out a little on the inter web. I found some pics that shows them as bonsai. Maybe someone can set me on the right path.
 1. When to transplant or do root work.
 2  When to prune.
 3. When to candle pinch and needle pluck.
 Pretty much everything. I'll try to get some pics posted soon.
    Thank you.
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M. Frary
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« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2013, 07:26 AM »

 Here is a picture of said Bristlecone pine.
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0soyoung
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2013, 11:39 AM »

So, why wouldn't you treat it like a white pine or at least start there?

Repot spring (when buds begin to swell)
Pinch candles (break off tips) to balance across tree after they've begun elongating in spring.
After new shoots have hardened, cut back new growth to 3 to 5 rows of fascicles (primary inducer of back budding)
Thin foliage / pluck needles in fall / early winter; prune to 'chase back the foliage'.

Branches are largely autonomous, so you can attempt variations on this theme on individual branches to learn your pine's responses.
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M. Frary
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« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2014, 01:47 PM »

  Here she is again this year. It made it through the winter just fine
sitting on the ground. Its one slow tree. The buds are just about to open now.
 One of the things I've learned about this tree is that it likes to dry out between waterings. I put it in this collander this spring. The substrate is half Napa floor dry and half turkey grit so it doesn't stay moist. It seems to love it and this way I can water every day and not worry.
 This fall I will be cutting the last part of the top off. Down 2 more whirls. I didn't want to cut off too much the first time so I'm doing it in stages.
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M. Frary
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2014, 03:02 PM »

  See what I'm saying? Now you would think someone here would have something to say about this. How many of these do you see?
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base797
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2014, 04:03 PM »

M.
I have a bristle one that I collected a few years ago and I think that Osoyoung got it right. Mine has had virtually nothing done to it as I wanted to let it grow freely for a couple years. I did break candles on the tree this year to even out its energy and left some to extend where I want future branches. The tree back budded on its own tremendously this year. I foliar feed a lot and really think that helps. Larry Jackal has a good one that has been in training for many years, I'm sure he would be happy to answer specific questions and he should be on the Rocky Mountain bonsai society site somewhere. I recently found a way better one that I will collect later this fall. Because it will be a fall collection and because of the value of the material, it will get some winter protection, but after that I will not worry about over wintering.
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Herman
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« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2014, 05:14 AM »

  Here she is again this year. It made it through the winter just fine
sitting on the ground. Its one slow tree. The buds are just about to open now.
 One of the things I've learned about this tree is that it likes to dry out between waterings. I put it in this collander this spring. The substrate is half Napa floor dry and half turkey grit so it doesn't stay moist. It seems to love it and this way I can water every day and not worry.
 This fall I will be cutting the last part of the top off. Down 2 more whirls. I didn't want to cut off too much the first time so I'm doing it in stages.

I think you will be able to make a nice upright tree with this Smiley wish I could grow bristtlecone pines ! though it's way too hot here by me. these 5needle pines sure are slow, aren't they?

kind regards
herman
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Sorce
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« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2014, 05:27 AM »

Sorry M.

Though I cant set u on the right path....i do like this tree.
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M. Frary
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« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2014, 05:51 AM »

  How slow was yours to push new growth this spring? The needles are just starting to show themselves on this one. It moves so slow it's exasperating.
 I'm just glad it made it through the last winter here. It stayed right out there with my tamaracks so at least I know winter care is a breeze.
  I'll have to try foliar feeding. And also did yours pop any buds on the trunk or just branches? I got both.
 Thank you .
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John Kirby
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« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2014, 10:47 AM »

The use of oil dry will continue to weaken your tree as the soil becomes more and more anoxic. I know, you like it, it is cheap and available. You would be far better served to plant it in straight grit or pumice or ground brick that has been washed of dust.

Does your tree have sticky needles? The small white specks of pitch/sap that you normally see in Bristlecones ?

Treat it like a white Pine.

John
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base797
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« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2014, 11:27 AM »

Mine opened with everything else in my garden well over a month and a half ago. It budded profusely, but not on the trunk. It's a rather old tree and I'm not sure it will bud back to wood that old. Also, the entire front of the trunk is a natural shari so lots less viable trunk. Heading up to the high country now to look for more bristlecones actually. I'll post some other pics (of the budding) tomorrow. J Kirby is right about the limitations of your substrate choice, btw.
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M. Frary
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« Reply #11 on: July 04, 2014, 06:59 PM »

The use of oil dry will continue to weaken your tree as the soil becomes more and more anoxic. I know, you like it, it is cheap and available. You would be far better served to plant it in straight grit or pumice or ground brick that has been washed of dust.

Does your tree have sticky needles? The small white specks of pitch/sap that you normally see in Bristlecones ?

Treat it like a white Pine.
  It has sap all over the needles. And needles are coming out of the new buds. It wasn't exactly a barn burner last year either. Next repot It will get more grit.
John
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John Kirby
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« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2014, 07:47 PM »

Sap on needles is a very good sign. Good luck.
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M. Frary
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« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2014, 11:26 PM »

  Thank you. The 4 pines that I have all took a long time to recover this spring. A mugo an eastern white pine a scotch pine and this tree. The wild trees around the property are just beginning to harden off their new growth so this isn't too far behind. Maybe 2 weeks. It was such a hard winter here that everything is a few weeks behind.
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base797
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« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2014, 10:39 AM »

Winter in colorado's front range are quite agreeable. It rarely stays very cold for very long. Here's a couple pics of the back budding on the main branches. Good luck with yours, bristlecones are cool trees. Also a pic of a bristlecone that came down from the high country yesterday.
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