Author Topic: Bristlecone Pines?  (Read 24130 times)

base797

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #30 on: July 08, 2014, 02:10 PM »
Found before and after of the Doug Fir Marc styled.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #31 on: July 08, 2014, 05:01 PM »
May have seen it.  Marc is a yamadori conifer ninja  ;D.  Nicely done


To get back to the thread, I grew Pinus aristata from seed a long time ago in a 40/60 peat to perlite mix and had about 5 out of 20 seeds pop.  Pretty slow to get established and all died or were given away.  Found the seeds in a 10 Pine Species package on EBay.  I do not reccommend buying seeds from there because they could be 10 years old.  Use Schumacher or Sheffield Seed.

Iseli was still producing cultivars when I worked there so you may be able to get them in through your local high-end garden center if you want a young container grown one.
 

Jason E

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #32 on: July 08, 2014, 08:19 PM »
Thanks for the insight Patrik.

J

 

Dan W.

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2014, 08:12 PM »
That was a good demo Patrik. Did you take any of the workshops at the convention? I was in Marc's Doug Fir workshop, and one of Harolds Blue Spruce.
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #34 on: July 19, 2014, 05:39 PM »
Back to M. Frary's original question. I mainly can speak from what not to do, my 2 attempts with nursery P. aristata ended in failure. I currently do not have a living Bristlecone pine. But I have learned a couple things. Also taking a series of classes with Peter Tea has helped. (and Ted Mattson too). Eventually I may try another so I have been "doing my Homework". 

Essentially, if you do anything at all to P. aristata, it is treated more like a JWP or a Mugo, than any other type of tree. First of all, let the tree tell you if it is ready for anything to be done. If it hasn't grown much, if you don't see much activity - do nothing, let it grow and get healthy. Work them once a year at most, then leave them alone. Give it more than 12 months to recover from repotting. Don't do too much all at once. If you see little or no growth - do nothing - let it gain strength.

P. aristata usually puts out one burst of growth - and then that is it for the year. If in less than ideal conditions, stressed, it can go years at a time not adding any significant growth, and that would be typical behavior for it in the wild. But if it is happy, you will get a nice single flush of growth. Do not do candle pruning, or 'breaking' during the growing season (per Peter Tea). Wait until fall and do bud selection, and prune out the excessively strong candles then. The timing for applying wire, and bending is as for white pines. Most of energy balancing, can be done by careful bud selection in fall. If there are not enough buds to choose from, then just leave the tree alone. When you only get single buds at the end of candles, your tree has not picked up vigor. Let it grow. It will bud back when healthy.

Like a mugo, these respond better if only given a major treatment once every couple years. They may tolerate a less invasive technique like minor wiring, (not major bending) and bud selection every year, but major stuff, like major bends, repotting, massive restyling, jin creation & carving, all should only happen once every 2 or so years. Pot it in a pot that could work as a display pot, then don't repot again for 5 to 10 years. They like their roots to be left alone.

So for timing, most techniques are best when the tree is actively growing or just finishing a good growing cycle. In this they resemble mugos, they resent any disturbance while dormant. If the growth is less than robust - just leave the tree alone for another season.

For the growth pattern, it is like a JWP, but its growing season is shorter, and it is less forgiving of disruptions. It is absolutely critical to look at your tree, and let it tell you whether it is ready for any work to be done. If you had no growth extentions this season, wait another year or two. Don't be afraid to just leave it alone for an extended period of time. These trees grow like they have all of eternity to get around to growing in. (meaning they are slow). So if you had little growth the previous year, and only a scattering of growth this current year, do nothing. Only do major styling if you had a good flush of growth the previous year and a good flush of growth this current year.

And definitely, they hate wet roots. The potting mix needs to be open, with good air voids, they do not like heavy wet mixes. Often nursery material because it is in a water retaining nursery soil, often will have root issues, if left in nursery media, definitely don't water it every day.

Hope this helps. Nursery material might be more vigorous, collected material can take a long time (many years) to settle in and get growing. Let them get growing before you work on them.

That sums up all I know about Bristlecone pines. Hope it helps. Actually talk with Vance Woods about how he treats his mugos. Granted Bristlecone is a 5 needle pine, so the structure of their growth is very similar to JWP, but because they are High Mountain pines from ARID regions, their environment is more like that of a mugo. They have a very compressed growing season in the wild. So Vance may have good insight on how to handle these. (since he really understands mugo)
 

M. Frary

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #35 on: July 20, 2014, 12:18 AM »
  Thanks Leo. It's doing fairly good at the moment. The new needles are just now extending. And yeah they don't like wet feet at all. The repotting in summer makes sense.
 

 Thank you
Mike Frary
 

Potawatomi13

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #36 on: May 08, 2015, 08:17 AM »
That newly collected one is a dandy.  You should get "The Bristlecone Book" by Lanner.  There's some great and important information in there about these unique trees that you should know.
 

Potawatomi13

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2015, 08:46 AM »
I would add a little to the former long post.  I've had an aristata for almost 20 years that started as about a 5 year nursery tree.  It has been in a commercial bonsai nursery soil and is kept where it has mostly full sun and wind exposure and it is a slow grower.  As mentioned these can hold their needles for as long as 40 years.  As this is their natural habit and unique to them I personally would not remove them.  A part of the reason is that they use these needles to keep photosynthesizing for the tree when it decides to take a rest and not grow much or at all.  It is also a unique and identifying characteristic of the species.  They would look "wrong" and un Bristlecone if plucked like a regular white pine.  Let them be what God created them to be.  One undesireable trait these share with Whitebark/albicaulis, Limber/flexilis and the other 2 Bristlecones/ balfouriana and longaeva is that they are very LIMBER and will need to be wired nearly forever to get them to take a "set".  These 5 trees are all 5 needle high altitude trees with many similarities. Nevertheless these and the other trees I mentioned in my humble opinion are all worthy and unique candidates for bonsai.  Once again I would strongly suggest getting "The Bristlecone Book" by Lanner to get some good and important info unique to these trees.
 

VanceWood

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #38 on: May 23, 2015, 09:38 PM »
How about posting a picture or two of the Bristlecone.  I don't think I have till now run into anyone who has had one successfully that long (20 years), that's a real accomplishment and I would really love to see it.
 

Potawatomi13

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2015, 05:02 AM »
I'll see if I can figure out how to do it Vance.  I havn't been able to get pics to load to my computer for awhile. >:(
 

Potawatomi13

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2015, 09:29 PM »
How about posting a picture or two of the Bristlecone.  I don't think I have till now run into anyone who has had one successfully that long (20 years), that's a real accomplishment and I would really love to see it.
OK here you go Vance;
 

VanceWood

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #41 on: June 22, 2015, 06:33 PM »
I'm impressed.  Not too many BC's in training that long that are documented.  Thanks for posting.
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #42 on: July 10, 2015, 06:33 PM »
Really nice
 

Potawatomi13

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #43 on: October 22, 2015, 01:10 AM »
Winter in colorado's front range are quite agreeable. It rarely stays very cold for very long. Here's a couple pics of the back budding on the main branches. Good luck with yours, bristlecones are cool trees. Also a pic of a bristlecone that came down from the high country yesterday.


This post on a BCP thread under "evergreens" pictured 2 or 3 trees you collected.  It is the bottom picture with an orange pop can in the pot.
 

base797

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #44 on: October 22, 2015, 12:41 PM »
White rascal wheat beer. Same size though. Here's an even better one. Sorry if pics are rotated, seems to always happen from iPad.