Author Topic: Bristlecone Pines?  (Read 24145 times)

M. Frary

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2014, 03:19 PM »
  The one that came down from the high country is making me drool. Wow!
 

fibonaccifemme

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2014, 10:05 PM »
Wow! I just spent lots of time and effort to hike to Nevada's bristlecones.
Where is it OK to collect them?
 

base797

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2014, 12:25 AM »
M,
You would not have envied the hike out, trust me. It's a very remote area and the hiking is truly dangerous. Finding trees like this is worth it though. I will have a better one later this year. Not a busted super old trunk with a (relatively speaking) young top. However, this came from a seed a very, very long time ago.

Fibonaccifemme (love the name),
Not sure if this is what you were "asking", but National forests issue permits for a "tree" and they don't really care which one. I suppose the majority of permits issued are for Christmas trees actually. Don't be fooled by the bucolic wooden signs "Entering/Leaving (blank) National Forest", they as a whole, are very utilitarian in design.
I too expended a great effort and many, many hours. To get to the location, to find out of a thousand trees, and especially hike out with something like this is an honor as well as a dodgy and burly task. Btw, National Parks and Wilderness Areas are a different story.
 

fibonaccifemme

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2014, 12:30 PM »
Base,
You're right, I was hiking in several sections of Great Basin National Park, so I know collecting there is verboten, but had not realized that there were bristlecones outside of protected areas.
If I can ask, what was the altitude and soil (if you can call it that) where you found your trees and how can you replicate their needs at home?
Also, my reading tells me their needles can live 40 years, does that change your cultivation practices?
 

Chrisl

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2014, 12:59 PM »
The use of oil dry will continue to weaken your tree as the soil becomes more and more anoxic. I know, you like it, it is cheap and available. You would be far better served to plant it in straight grit or pumice or ground brick that has been washed of dust.

Does your tree have sticky needles? The small white specks of pitch/sap that you normally see in Bristlecones ?

Treat it like a white Pine.

John

Gotta agree John.  I've seen two collected trees in oil dry, and the roots were gross...too wet/too anoxic, brown unhealthy.  Not a pretty sight 
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2014, 05:16 PM »
Base, that new one is very impressive.  I'm a big Colorado Blue Spruce fan and am actually receiving a new one in a few days.  Please keep me in mind if you see any bunjin pine potensai out there.
 

Jason E

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2014, 06:49 PM »
Nice Owen I almost bought that same one from Todd, I did acquire an awesome CBS Todd collected awhile back though.
They are sweet trees.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2014, 10:25 PM »
I have one of the really big ones already and am convinced that Todd's trees are one of the best species of conifer for bonsai.  Will post pics here after the chaos of the show in Nashville subsides. 

I was surprised that one was available to be honest.  Now it's not  ;D

www.firstbranchbonsai.com
 

M. Frary

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2014, 12:25 PM »
The use of oil dry will continue to weaken your tree as the soil becomes more and more anoxic. I know, you like it, it is cheap and available. You would be far better served to plant it in straight grit or pumice or ground brick that has been washed of dust.

Does your tree have sticky needles? The small white specks of pitch/sap that you normally see in Bristlecones ?

  I don't have a problem at all using Napa floor dri. Are you guys referring to something else? Something made out of clay maybe? The stuff I use is made of diatomaceous earth. I do put turkey grit with it. Doesn't break down and I get excellent root growth.
Treat it like a white Pine.

John

Gotta agree John.  I've seen two collected trees in oil dry, and the roots were gross...too wet/too anoxic, brown unhealthy.  Not a pretty sight 
 

base797

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2014, 12:27 PM »
Fibonacci,
The elevation was just over 11000 feet and the soil was very light and surprisingly cool to the touch. Comprised of decomposed granite sand (along with some large intact rocks)  and decomposed plant material. It was put into my standard mix, mainly scoria with some pumice and turface. Observing the native soil is advisable, but doesn't mean you want to simply duplicate it, especially with modern substrate choices. I have many collected trees and all if which the goal is to eventually swap out the old medium for complete inorganic mix. Fertilization program becomes essential obviously. Although needles may last for decades on some trees in their natural environment, I don't think that will be the case in my garden where they are not so limited be harsh conditions, super short growing season and the overall lack of love that they receive in my care. I now have three in my garden, the new one which hasn't had a chance to show me anything and one of the other two has shed some old needles. The two I've had for years are quite healthy and vigorous now. They will be treated like white pine basically. I do keep them in the relatively coolest section of my garden.

Owen,
I'm sure I already have some things you would like, but it don't typically ship and the bunjin in particular add an extra challenge by nature, tall, lanky and delicate. I figured Todd was on the selling end of your acquisition. He's a good friend of mine and we share the same mentor for collecting.  Jerry Morris, who adds trees to Todd's offerings, is one of my favorite people on the planet and he's got access to a private ranch where many of the cbs come from. I have more engelmann the picea pungens. Also many rmj and Doug fir. Some limber, single Utah juniper and lodgepole. The latter two come mainly from the western slope and a bit farther of a drive to get to.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2014, 08:28 PM »
Cool.  I've met Jerry and spent a few days with Todd last Fall (RMBS Events).  Yep, got it from
Todd.  Mike Blanton was one of my mentors and met through him.  Three cheers for the old guard  :D. When it comes to media choices, I ask older collectors.  I try to support good people and Todd and Jerry certainly fall into that group.  I'll be out there in October (Salt Lake and potentially Wyoming).  Thinking of driving back.

 

John Kirby

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2014, 11:01 PM »
My understanding is that Jerry has decided to stop collecting. The trees he was bringing out were really old and because the were growing over a spring, had very shallow and high quality root structure. There are some ancient and highly unusual trees there. Todd has really become a fine artist, spending time with Ryan has really helped him find his eye and technique to go with the great trees.

Murray, best if luck.,
 

Jason E

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2014, 12:15 AM »
The trees he was bringing out were really old and because the were growing over a spring, had very shallow and high quality root structure. There are some ancient and highly unusual trees there

that is what I heard also , and that there were no more coming out of the area? I was lucky enough to get one of these cbs's from that area, Incredible trees, will start a post about it.

 
« Last Edit: July 08, 2014, 12:22 AM by Jason E »
 

John Kirby

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #28 on: July 08, 2014, 08:21 AM »
Murry=Mfrary. Best of luck. Iphone ......
 

base797

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Re: Bristlecone Pines?
« Reply #29 on: July 08, 2014, 02:04 PM »
Yes, the very best ones (cbs from that spot) have made their way into the community, but Jerry is still collecting (from the aforementioned area and everywhere). Jerry knows the Rocky Mountains probably better than anyone and he still roams around often collecting. The South Park area is still producing, just not with the same size and quality material. That guy is unstoppable, 80+ years old and still hikes me into the ground. He did liquidate his greenhouses in an effort to downsize, I recall him telling me "I need to get rid of things over a hundred pounds because they are getting hard to move". He is truly an inspiration and vast source of horticultural knowledge. If anyone has one of his trees, consider it a piece of US bonsai history, IMO.

Owen, really sorry to hear about Mike. Did you ever see the Doug Fir he bought after Marc Noelanders styled it here in Denver at the international show? Pretty sure Todd ended up buying it from Mike and probably still has it. That was a tree I collected a few years prior and didn't know what to do with. Seeing that transformation really changed the way I look at possible material. Good stuff.