Author Topic: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?  (Read 6599 times)

Chrisl

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2012, 10:09 AM »
I'm hoping to get some Boon.  Brian Van Fleet tried this with a tree with Kathy I think about 1-2yrs ago.  He hasn't seen it afterwards, but has plans to see the tree coming up.  He told me he'd shoot me a pic when that happens and I'll gladly share it here with the group.
 

boon

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2012, 07:46 AM »
here are some pictures i took from my student's trees   the first one is grown from seed.  grown in the pot the first 2 years and then in the ground for 3 years
 

boon

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2012, 07:50 AM »
here is the pictures before we repot into anderson pot.

if you do it correctly, it will not take that long to develop nice nebari and nice trunk.  then you can have fun developing branches.  buds are there to work on.  or graft new ones where ever you want
 

Chrisl

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2012, 08:37 AM »
Very nice Boon!  But I'm not too keen on the scar from the sacrificial branch that was left on to thicken trunk.  I know it's the quickest way, but it'd be much better w/out the scar imo.  Certainly not bad at all for 5 yrs though!
 

boon

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 280
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2012, 10:57 PM »
Very nice Boon!  But I'm not too keen on the scar from the sacrificial branch that was left on to thicken trunk.  I know it's the quickest way, but it'd be much better w/out the scar imo.  Certainly not bad at all for 5 yrs though!

thanks,  the scar will be treated next year after the tree get established in the new pot.  we will not use that side for the front.  the scar will be on the side or the back of the tree.  we have not pick the front yet.  the tree this young, the scar is not big, it will not take long to heal it.
it is good to hear you like trees without scar.  it would be nice for other members to see bonsai without scar.  can you please post some of your trees that has no scar? 
 

Chrisl

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2012, 11:49 AM »
Oh, that's good Boon, I thought that scar was going to be the front ;)

The trees I have right now that don't have any scars are the seedlings I just planted this spring and will be using a clip and grow method to prevent scarring.  The others are my collected Ponderosa Pines.  The rest of my trees I began from nursery plants so they all have scars, or field grown trees that have been chopped so far, but still will have small scars when I cut off the unneeded branches.

So my end goal is to have trees with no scars and just be prepared for these to take a long time to develop.  Looking out long term Boon, I hope to have a few Tridents, Ch. Elms, JM's, Shimpakus and Quinces with no scars in 5-10 yrs.  But it's something that I want to learn how to do and I'm just going to have to be patient and see if I can be successful...

I recently here mentioned an article from Bonsai Today, about developing JBP's trunks quickly using sacrificial branches.  Then John K. mentioned the scars, and I thought to myself that's not what I want in my collection in the end.  So I'm not trying that technique at all.  Like I think John mentioned, there's no quick route to a great bonsai. 
 

Chrisl

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
Re: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2012, 10:03 AM »
Morning guys.  I had my bonsai class this last sat. and I was talking to another member about my JRP that I brought in to work on.  (Almost entirely bud selection and removal as it's just packed with way too many buds)  Anyway, I mentioned I liked this tree a lot, but had the little reverser taper.  This guy, way more experienced than I, said too the hammer technique didn't work on a JBP, after 2 yrs of trying, with also just a little reverse taper.  He said that over time, he kept potting the pine in a shallower pot till he got it to fit in about a 2" deep pot.  It stayed in the pot for I think 2 yrs. and that now the reverse taper is gone, but still not thicker than the trunk above it yet.  So he repotted last week in the same container and believes the base will continue to thicken up along with the nicely developing nebari. 

George Muranaka told me to hold off repotting for at least a yr.  It's in a 5" bulb nursery pot now so when the time comes, I'll pot it in a 4" deep pot.  This is going to take awhile and I'm in no rush as the tree already needs enough work done to it already.  And I'll see if it actually works.  I'm happy to hear this "Might" work, better than depending on the hammer which some feel works, others don't, and a much better solution than carving scars to mask the rev. taper.  Plus, this technique sounds logical at the very least ;)