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Author Topic: Anyone use this technique to fix reverse taper on JRP?  (Read 3329 times)
Chrisl
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« on: March 16, 2012, 09:36 AM »

I have a JRP with just a little reverse taper the first 2 " of the trunk.  Someone at out last club meeting someone said that you can use an exacto knife and make multiple 360 degree, vertical cuts into the bark on the skinny part of the reverse taper.  And when it heals, the bark has thickened and no scarring since the cut was so thin.
Anyone know or hear about this?  Oh, he also said not to use the hammer technique on pines...which I hadn't heard before??

The other fix I heard was from someone who learned this from Kathy Shaner who carves ovals into the skinny part of the reverse taper and when it callouses over, no more rev. taper.  I'd much not rather have two scars on the lower trunk.
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kostas
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2012, 12:29 PM »

hi i think you must put wire 360 at the spring until strangle the bark and the winter (after you have take out the wire) take a very sharp knife and do horizontal cuts or diagonal on the top of wire scar.somethink like this in foto.one other tecknik i now its to carve some small halls under the problem spot 10-20 Day's before the dormand period sho the tree blinding for that time weakening the spot under the problem and the aped part it get fut er.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 12:54 PM by kostas » Logged

Chrisl
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 01:58 PM »

What's the reasoning for the needed wire?  Not quite sure I'm following
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kostas
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 03:58 PM »

What's the reasoning for the needed wire?  Not quite sure I'm following
to stop the juice at a specific point  so the snicks at the autumn open wider.
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boon
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2012, 10:47 PM »

Those techniques do not work. They just left bad callas wound on the trunk.  The older it gets, the worse it looks.
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2012, 01:27 AM »

Boon, what would you reccomend?  Also, do you think grafting a branch at the inverse taper point and allowing to grow freely for a while would work?

Thanks,
Owen
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kostas
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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2012, 04:31 AM »

Those techniques do not work. They just left bad callas wound on the trunk.  The older it gets, the worse it looks.

hi, you have tried them and you have this effects, on pine?
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boon
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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2012, 07:32 AM »

Kostas and Owen,
No I have not tried it myself.  I have seen and work on a lot of black pine.  I do not think it is fixable. It might help to graft a small branch on the side where it ha reverse taper and let it run for a few years.  Or plant a second tree and third trees on the side. Make it a clump style.
The best way to do is to grow them from seed. The amount of time and effort to fix bad tree will end up about the same time or less to grow a new one from seed. The result will be much better.  Follow the article in Bonsai today #20.
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kostas
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« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2012, 01:21 PM »

Kostas and Owen,
No I have not tried it myself.  I have seen and work on a lot of black pine.  I do not think it is fixable. It might help to graft a small branch on the side where it ha reverse taper and let it run for a few years.  Or plant a second tree and third trees on the side. Make it a clump style.
The best way to do is to grow them from seed. The amount of time and effort to fix bad tree will end up about the same time or less to grow a new one from seed. The result will be much better.  Follow the article in Bonsai today #20.
you have a point Grin (that tecknick they use to some nursery's to create cork bark at a short period 3-4 years in pines but also can use it to thickening some parts of the trunk the only deference's is that for cork bark you left the wire inside the bark.)
« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 01:25 PM by kostas » Logged

Owen Reich
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« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2012, 07:46 PM »

Boon, I agree about the amount of time needed to fix a tree versus making a good one from the start.  My concern is for customers who have a pine that they really like and want to "save" from going to the raffle table  Grin.  Additional trees are also a good option.
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Chrisl
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2012, 06:54 AM »

Agree Owen.  Or that we have trees that are pretty nice, but with a little reverse taper, are the ones we can afford lol
Worst possibility is the one I mentioned in my  first post, ' Kathy Shaner who carves ovals into the skinny part of the reverse taper and when it callouses over, no more rev. taper.
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Adair M
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« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2012, 08:36 PM »

I personally dislike any tree that has the spiral cut in wire.

Like the one pictured below.  I don't own this tree, but it's offered for sale on-line.

And for some reason, they do this to the JWP grafts, too.  I really don't get that.  The JBP rootstock will grow much faster than the JWP scion anyway.  Why do they do that?  (I guess so the trunk will fatten that much faster... which means it's saleable faster.  But, those trees will never be "great" trees.
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kostas
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« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2012, 11:27 AM »

I personally dislike any tree that has the spiral cut in wire.

Like the one pictured below.  I don't own this tree, but it's offered for sale on-line.

And for some reason, they do this to the JWP grafts, too.  I really don't get that.  The JBP rootstock will grow much faster than the JWP scion anyway.  Why do they do that?  (I guess so the trunk will fatten that much faster... which means it's saleable faster.  But, those trees will never be "great" trees.
i think you are wrong because at some point the bark its unaided. if you notice my image above the horizontal lines its the wire that its inside the tree, and if the bark goes one, you cant tell if some great trees its fixed with that method if you cant see the wounts.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2012, 11:31 AM by kostas » Logged

boon
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« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2012, 12:14 AM »

Boon, I agree about the amount of time needed to fix a tree versus making a good one from the start.  My concern is for customers who have a pine that they really like and want to "save" from going to the raffle table  Grin.  Additional trees are also a good option.

Owen,
I am always direct and honest about how i feel about the trees.  People in the class who want to improve their collection usually understand what i told them.  This is what i try to educate my students what is good material and what is not.  if it is fixable, we will.  some problem is too much trouble and take too long too fix.

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boon
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« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2012, 12:17 AM »

Agree Owen.  Or that we have trees that are pretty nice, but with a little reverse taper, are the ones we can afford lol
Worst possibility is the one I mentioned in my  first post, ' Kathy Shaner who carves ovals into the skinny part of the reverse taper and when it callouses over, no more rev. taper.

it would be nice to see some result.  pictures would be nice.
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