Author Topic: Texas Ashe Juniper  (Read 13691 times)

John Kirby

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Texas Ashe Juniper
« on: July 31, 2009, 10:41 AM »
Another North American Juniper species. This tree was collected in 1975 by John Miller, one of the great pioneering member of Texas bonsai, who is still an active force in the state. The tree was very carefully handled and the clay it was growing in was gradually reduced over the years. Marc Noelanders styled the tree as a slant during the LSBF Texas Tour in 2005. I purchased the tree in 2007 at the LSBF show in Dallas from the host club. I wanted to make the tree more of an upright, and when Mike Hagedorn visited in 2008 he went even more radically upright than I had seen. Plus with very careful  work on defining the lifeline and deadwood, went from a rather diffuse and broad lifeline, to the slender and popping one the tree has now. Currently we are working to balance the growth between the very aggressively growing top and the slower growing bottom branches. It will be plucked again over the next couple of weeks.

John
 

Dwight

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2009, 02:21 PM »
Nice tree ! It illustrates what can be done with this species as it is as nice as most RMJs out there. Good to see something native to Texas.
 

johng

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2009, 03:45 PM »
Nice John!  Doesn't this species compare more to California Juniper than RMJ?  I believe I am right in saying that Arthur Joura at the NC Arboretum has been working with an Ashe Juniper for a number of years now.  I think it is probably a similar scale to this tree.  I lived in Monroe, Louisiana for a number of years...is your humidity about the same?
THanks for posting!
John
 

John Kirby

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2011, 06:44 PM »
Updated before and after of this tree after it was worked on by Peter Tea an artist and friend from California. I think Peter did a marvelous job.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2011, 09:32 PM »
Wow.  That's one of the nicest native junipers I've seen.  I like the most recent styling as well.  What's with the coloration in the apex of the tree?
 

shimsuki

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2011, 09:36 PM »
Very Nice!

If I went out looking for this tree, how do I distinguish it from the Eastern Red Cedars all over Missouri?



Andrew
 

John Kirby

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2011, 09:55 PM »
Wayne, the coloration is due to pollen cones. Peter told me that the tree was completely covered with them a couple of weeks ago and it was a solid cloud of pollen when touched. They are clearing up rather quickly.

Andrew, the foliage is more compact and upright than on J. virginiana, and the foliage has another attribute as well. if you crush the foliage between the thumb and forefinger it has a much stronger smell than the Eastern Red Cedar. I know folks who call the ERC  cat pee junipers because of their smell, the Ashe Juniper would be called a "concentrated cat pee" juniper.

Hope this helps,
John
 

John Kirby

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2011, 10:16 PM »
Just a quick note, here is the tree after it was styled in February 2008 by Mike Hagedorn, it has a bit of flash shadow. with the reduced foliage mass the trunk is very interesting from this angle. John
 

Peter Tea

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2011, 01:33 AM »
Nice tree ;)

I'm still sneezing from the pollen.  LOL
 

bwaynef

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2011, 08:23 AM »
Since you're here Peter, why'd you choose this front over the one Mike chose?
 

reddog

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2011, 10:44 AM »
Both designs are great but I like Michael's design a bit better.  More interest in this design. 
 

John Kirby

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2011, 03:59 PM »
Interesting, why?
 

Mike Pollock

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2011, 04:23 PM »
I like the front better on the current photo. The base seems much more natural and stronger as it grasps the ground.

I'm ready to vote for tree of the month...  ;)
 

Peter Tea

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2011, 03:26 AM »
Since you're here Peter, why'd you choose this front over the one Mike chose?

I choose this front so I can see the flare at the base of the tree better.  Though nebari is not the most important part of a collected tree, if it can be shown, it's a plus.  I also like this front because you can see the deadwood feature at the base of the tree.  The shadow effect give it more depth and interests.  With the old front, it looked flat and plain.

With this new front, I get the same amount of curves, plus flare at the base and shari feature at the base.
Hope this helps.  Thanks!
 

John Kirby

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Re: Texas Ashe Juniper
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2011, 12:20 PM »
There has always been a bit of discussion about how best to front this tree. Mike's solution kept the life-line meandering directly in front, and in the minimum foliage approach allowed for the deadwood extending from the trunk top to be used as a key feature. The tree has grown well over the past 3 years and the deadwood apex is less appealing at this time (to me anyway). I really like what Peter has done, it is an interesting tree and the lifeline is really starting to pop out and gain a mature look to it- takes time.