Bonsai Study Group Forum

Species Specific => North American Juniper Bonsai Discussion => Topic started by: boon on March 27, 2010, 12:39 AM

Title: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 27, 2010, 12:39 AM
This is a big one.  An old timer gave Mr. and Mrs. Smith a large ash juniper. 
We repotted and put it in Boon Mix 2 years ago.  We bare root the front half of the rootball.  It recovered very quickly. We let it grow for the whole year. We removed old needle and lightly prune in October.   In July, we did some heavy bending on the top of the tree and also the slant trunk.  then let it grow again.
Last fall Oct, 2009, we wired the whole tree.  it grew strong.
the picture from all 4 sides
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 27, 2010, 12:43 AM
We removed old needles before wiring.  Old weak branches and old long branches were removed
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 27, 2010, 12:50 AM
After it grew strong, new buds will grow in the interior.  they are kept and let grow.  now it is stong enough to take over.  We can cut off long branches.
Mr. Smith held the paper
close up of the branches
after cutting long branches off. (Cut back)

this will rejuvenate the tree and help keeping it compact
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 27, 2010, 12:54 AM
close up on the branch that was cut back
Mrs. Smith worked on the tree.
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 27, 2010, 12:57 AM
close up pic of the structure of the pad from above.  we have branches on both left and right and top of the branch
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 27, 2010, 01:00 AM
after thinning
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: JRob on March 27, 2010, 06:42 AM
All,

A very interesting species. Juniperus ashei is a drought tolerant evergreen native to northeastern Mexico, south central United States north to southern Missouri. Most prevalent in central Texas where it can develop large stands. It is considered a weed my many ranchers because cattle will not graze on it.

Love the tree.

JRob
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: Larry Gockley on March 27, 2010, 05:40 PM
Amazing juniper Boon, thanks for sharing. The Ashe Juniper is called " cedar ", by the locals, and the source of the dreaded " cedar fever ", a real problem to allergy sufferers.  This tree shows it is collectable indeed, a beautiful specimen.
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: bonsaikc on March 28, 2010, 01:51 PM
Here's a much earlier picture of Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 28, 2010, 05:22 PM
All,

A very interesting species. Juniperus ashei is a drought tolerant evergreen native to northeastern Mexico, south central United States north to southern Missouri. Most prevalent in central Texas where it can develop large stands. It is considered a weed my many ranchers because cattle will not graze on it.

Love the tree.

JRob

in Texas, bonsai enthusiasts have been using it for decades.  it has been a touchy tree to some.  it die easily and it turn juvenile(needle like foliage) easily .
i have not have thoses problem with the way we work on them.  after about 7 years of working with this specie.  we have not lost one tree yet.  they are all growing very well. 

we would love to find the weed tree with twists and curves.
thanks,
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 28, 2010, 05:27 PM
Amazing juniper Boon, thanks for sharing. The Ashe Juniper is called " cedar ", by the locals, and the source of the dreaded " cedar fever ", a real problem to allergy sufferers.  This tree shows it is collectable indeed, a beautiful specimen.

I am allergic to pine and juniper pollen.  it is hard to work on when they are in bloom.  we work on several collected specimens.  they have quite a few ash junipers in their collections.  the needles looks like itoigawa shimpaku but it is more leggy.
Thanks,
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 28, 2010, 05:31 PM
after wiring in October, 2009.  this is the work of Mr. and Mrs. Smith.  they make beautiful bonsai.
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 28, 2010, 05:37 PM
Here's a much earlier picture of Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

when they are on the silver screen.

here is when they are at home.
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: garywood on March 28, 2010, 06:59 PM
Boon, it looks like Sylvia is getting around. At first I thought she was with Hiroshi Suzuki and then I realized That's Antonio Banderas.   ;D
Wood
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: cbobgo on March 29, 2010, 07:29 PM
Obviously a fantastic tree, and I have never worked on anything near this quality myself, so I feel I barely have any standing to make a comment . . .

That being said, the design of this tree seems to me to be a little too tall.  The large deadwood that moves so dramatically to the right would seem to set the tone of a tree that has been beaten down by the forces of nature, and has survived by staying low.  Having the apex somewhat lower, and with more motion to the right would seem to be keeping more in tune with the rest of the tree.

I'd welcome some thoughts from Boon or anyone else to help me understand the design better.

- bob
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: John Kirby on March 29, 2010, 09:39 PM
Put it in a taller pot, it will look shorter.

John
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 30, 2010, 02:29 AM
Boon, it looks like Sylvia is getting around. At first I thought she was with Hiroshi Suzuki and then I realized That's Antonio Banderas.   ;D
Wood

Not much now,  they just have a girl in January.  they still teach their class at home.
which Hiroshi you are talking about?
Title: Re: Texas Ash Juniper
Post by: boon on March 30, 2010, 02:41 AM
Obviously a fantastic tree, and I have never worked on anything near this quality myself, so I feel I barely have any standing to make a comment . . .

That being said, the design of this tree seems to me to be a little too tall.  The large deadwood that moves so dramatically to the right would seem to set the tone of a tree that has been beaten down by the forces of nature, and has survived by staying low.  Having the apex somewhat lower, and with more motion to the right would seem to be keeping more in tune with the rest of the tree.

I'd welcome some thoughts from Boon or anyone else to help me understand the design better.

- bob


bringing the apex down, you will lose the space between the two trunk lines.  the flow of the two created by nature.  Balance on this two is slight off.   the lower tree is thicker than the top tree.  we are thinking about removing more wood off the lower tree and make it smaller than the first tree.  we are also growing more foliage on the lower tree.  it is not that easy when the top tree's life line is wider and the lower tree is very skinny.  we are working on refining it. 
it is not refine tree yet.  it is still in training.  more work will be put in to it. 
The Smith take good care of their trees.  this tree has only been a few years in their collection.  it progress extremely fast.