Author Topic: My Rocky Mountain Juniper  (Read 25908 times)

Elliott

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #45 on: December 13, 2011, 03:36 PM »
OK John....point taken. I humbly retract my statement (on my knees-please skip the next joke-) I haven't spent the day with most the people you mentioned, so I can't say a blanket statement like that and I look forward to learning from all the new blood coming out of Japan. maybe I just in a little awe or Ryan's skills and his teaching abilities.
 And I'm sure you aren't so shabby yourself. Please come out to Cally (if you have not already) and prove it.
I learned about the benefits and advantages of grafting from Roy Nagatoshi and John Wang.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2011, 06:18 PM »
About ten-twelve years ago I spent an afternoon with Roy Nagatoshi at his place. The old California Junipers that his father had grafted were just spectacular (his weren't bad either, don't get me wrong, just not grafted as long). He is an interesting and talented guy.

I will be doing Bonsai in California this weekend. Going to get my fall work done at Boon's. I live vicariously through my friends who go to Japan to train, maybe the next life.

John
 

Elliott

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #47 on: December 13, 2011, 06:56 PM »
Roy is one of the nicest guys you will ever meet. I really enjoyed watching his father (Shig Nagatoshi, one of the pioneers of Bonsai in California and made grafting popular) work also. Recently Roy was feeling a little tightness in his chest and went to the ER at the insistence of some of the students he was working with at that moment. Turns out he had some blockages in his coronary arteries and had a stat procedure to ream them out. He felt better instantly. We were all very relieved that he is better than new now! I think at this point he can graft Kishu on any type of shimpaku with his eyes closed.
 Please take lots of pics at Boons and then post them. Thanks
 

Dave Murphy

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #48 on: December 14, 2011, 01:31 PM »
I finished (I think :P) the fine wiring here.  Frankly Jrob, I think your teacher would probably make me remove all the wire and start over :o...I would then have to find another teacher ;D.  Anyway, I'm done with this one until next year.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #49 on: December 14, 2011, 03:43 PM »
Makes you feel better to have the wire on it! Looks really good. John
 

Dave Murphy

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #50 on: December 14, 2011, 06:03 PM »
Yes, it does feel pretty good to have the tree fully wired...until it needs to come off ;D.  Thanks again, John.
 

Adair M

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 622
  • Thanked: 6 times
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2011, 07:55 PM »
Dave,

It looks really nice!  I have a question... the little sprig off the bottom left branch that crosses in front of the trunk... It appears to be heading right towards a pad that extends off the lower right branch.  What are your plans for that?  Personally, I would have directled it so that it stayed to the left of the trunk.  (Then again, maybe my eye is insufficiently trained!)

Regardless, it's spectacular, and it's a tree that you will enjoy for years!

 

scottroxburgh

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #52 on: December 14, 2011, 08:22 PM »
Wow, it is always interesting to get the standard US conversation that 'someone is the best', vs isn't it really nice that we are getting a number of highly trained bonsai professionals in the US? Think about it, we now have Kathy S, Bill Valvanis, Joe Harris, Boon, Mike Hagedorn, Ryan, Matt (soon), Bjorn and Owen (soon), and the Europeans like Marc Noelanders, Marco, Colin (now in us), Peter Warren and many others who work significantly in the US. Plus there seems to be a pipeline of young talent going to the best bonsai gardens for training in Japan, Think Peter Tea and Tyler Sherrod. I think the real benefits will be a huge increase in the opportunity for those interested in learning how to produce and care for high quality bonsai in the US (and Canada, sorry guys).

Agreed...comparing to Australia, that has zero bonsai professionals, and a few quality bonsai growers, you guys are EXTREMELY LUCKY!

I'm sure there is a skilled migrant Visa for any US Bonsai professionals looking for a captive market, and nice weather ;)
 

Dave Murphy

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #53 on: December 14, 2011, 08:35 PM »
Dave,

It looks really nice!  I have a question... the little sprig off the bottom left branch that crosses in front of the trunk... It appears to be heading right towards a pad that extends off the lower right branch.  What are your plans for that?  Personally, I would have directled it so that it stayed to the left of the trunk.  (Then again, maybe my eye is insufficiently trained!)

Regardless, it's spectacular, and it's a tree that you will enjoy for years!



Adam, thanks for the post.  The portion of foliage from the lower left branch is being used to break up and partially conceal the high, straight portion of deadwood just to the left of the main trunk.  It also serves to frame the really choice portion of deadwood above it.  Also, the two portions of foliage are really quite far apart only appear to be close together due to the two dimensional photograph.
 

Elliott

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #54 on: December 14, 2011, 11:55 PM »
Nice use of foliage pad layers and negative space. That small branch that crosses the trunk ads a nice touch of naturalness. Are you going to let the deadwood age and allow it to become various shades of grey? Not a huge fan of that stark white wood, although it can just be due to the photo exposure. Please keep up the good work.
Eli
 

Dave Murphy

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #55 on: December 15, 2011, 06:45 AM »
Thanks Elliot.  The deadwood was treated with lime sulfur back in October in order to "age" newer wood exposed when the live vein cleaned up.  The natural grey color will start coming back in a few months, I would think.
 

Chrisl

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #56 on: December 15, 2011, 10:51 AM »
Great job Dave!  Looks really nice!  Beautiful tree!
Chris
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #57 on: December 15, 2011, 10:56 AM »
Dave, adding a few drops of India ink to the water, before you add the lime sulphur, works to dramatically reduce the glare. If you do it right, you can show the tree the next day. John
 

Dave Murphy

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 207
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #58 on: December 15, 2011, 11:05 AM »
Thanks John.  I've heard of mixing the india ink with the lime sulfur and actually went on a brief search to find some the day before I treated this one (my GPS was not good to me that day and I never found the Michaels store :().  I may experiment on some other trees first before screwing this one up :P ;D.
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: My Rocky Mountain Juniper
« Reply #59 on: December 15, 2011, 02:49 PM »
Can't hurt, comes offwiththe lime sulphur. I get mine at Walmart.