Species Specific > North American Juniper Bonsai Discussion

Collecting Ashe Juniper

<< < (2/3) > >>

MatsuBonsai:

--- Quote from: BK1017 on October 12, 2010, 11:16 AM ---Got my hands on the "Collecting Wild Trees DVD" which was really informative, although I don't think the techniques he uses for those species will apply to central Texas landscape. I discovered there was an article written about this exact topic that was published in the Journal of the American Bonsai Society: "FINDING AND COLLECTING ASHE JUNIPERS IN CENTRAL TEXAS (fall 2002, volume 36, number 3 and 4) by Bill Cody. However, I can't find any back issues that old. Anybody have access to this article? Thanks!

--- End quote ---

You might want to contact bob k to see if he can point you in the right direction finding a copy of the article.

arcina:
I am part of the Dallas Bonsai club and I have been collecting ashe junipers in the last 3 years. For whatever reason I have been very successful. We collect in Feb at the end of winter. They are difficult to collect because they grow in rocks and clay so a shovel is not a good tool. A pick would do the trick. Mostly get as much root ball as you can. A lot of people do not get enough or they break it when they are taking it out of the hole.

Before putting it a pot, I scratch the sides to expose some roots. Then I cut them a little bit. The idea is to force the roots to grow. On the base I add pumice as my drainage layer and I add good bonsai soil on the sides. I can tell you that using good bonsai soil has made a difference in how long it takes to the tree to start growing. The last step is to put it in a shaded area completely protected from the wind under a mist system. I run it 1-2 mins every 20 mins.

Mike Pollock:
Checked my back issues. Mine run out in 2001. Sorry.

BK1017:

--- Quote from: arcina on October 12, 2010, 06:06 PM ---I am part of the Dallas Bonsai club and I have been collecting ashe junipers in the last 3 years. For whatever reason I have been very successful. We collect in Feb at the end of winter. They are difficult to collect because they grow in rocks and clay so a shovel is not a good tool. A pick would do the trick. Mostly get as much root ball as you can. A lot of people do not get enough or they break it when they are taking it out of the hole.

Before putting it a pot, I scratch the sides to expose some roots. Then I cut them a little bit. The idea is to force the roots to grow. On the base I add pumice as my drainage layer and I add good bonsai soil on the sides. I can tell you that using good bonsai soil has made a difference in how long it takes to the tree to start growing. The last step is to put it in a shaded area completely protected from the wind under a mist system. I run it 1-2 mins every 20 mins.

--- End quote ---

Nice! Great info. Are you collecting older or younger material? I'm actually meeting up with the Austin Bonsai Society tonight. The president, Joey, told me that a member of the club spent roughly 20 years studying the collection of this species. His writings are going to be available to buy soon, so I'll post any additional nuggets of wisdom I may find.

arcina:
Mostly old material. Please let me know any good info. Additionally, I am looking for good collecting places. If you have any suggestions it would be strongly appreciated

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version