Author Topic: Ash juniper  (Read 3658 times)

Dwight

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Ash juniper
« on: September 09, 2011, 01:10 PM »
I was fortunate enough to find this Ask juniper in a small bonsai nursery Pflugerville , TX ( N. Austin ). It's been in captivity at least ten years and is kinda leggy. I plan on an informal upright / semi cascade with most of the foilage over the live vein cascading down to pot level.The chopstick at the bottom of the last pic is the temp. front. Any comments are welcome.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2011, 01:14 PM by Dwight »
 

John Kirby

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2011, 01:34 PM »
Dwight, nice tree, I like it. I think the 2nd picture, maybe turned a little, makes a really nice front, nice deadwood but not as static as the last picture. The tree has lots of nice small branches, looks like it will be a styling dream. I have repotted mine twice now, removed about 1/2 of the old collected soil each time (the trees were collected in 75 and 95 or so). they are doing great. I would recommend that you work to get the old clay and stuff off over time, most of the folks I know in Texas are afraid to repot these, you have to take your time but they can produce pots full of roots when in good soil.  
 

Dwight

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2011, 03:59 PM »
John , I was told it had been repotted twice when I got it. The soil is real fast draining and looks like granite , pumice and akadama. I'll repot it in a couple of years anyway. Don't know why Texans are afraid to repot these , just do a third every other year and it should work fine.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 04:34 PM »
Cool, most of them that I have seen still have a big chunk of that nasty texas clay jumped up around the base of the trunk. Nice find.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 07:47 PM »
Really nice potential.  I've only seen a handful of these, but I really like them.  I was just 5 when my family left Texas.  I think I might still have some cousins there that I need to visit...  :)
 

Dwight

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2011, 12:40 PM »
Me and the tree are going to Albuquerque in Oct. The instructor is a Lady from San Diego who studies with Roy Nagatoshi so she should know junipers. Other than the obvious stiff branches is there anything I need to know beforehand ?
 

Dwight

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2011, 05:23 PM »
Went to the workshop in Albuquerque last weekend. Had a chance to really examine the tree and it's growing and backbudding like a weed. Cindy read gave the workshop and we did a little triming and some wiring. Much smaller tree now. I'll post pics as I continue to wire the thing ( lots of branches ) but it looks a bunch better already.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2011, 08:43 PM »
So, what's next?  Did you guys talk about more work in Spring?
 

Dwight

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Re: Ash juniper
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2011, 01:29 PM »
More trimming to push back the growth. And more wire of course. This thing has about ten million small branvhes.