Author Topic: Choosing a shoku  (Read 43062 times)

akeppler

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2009, 12:17 PM »
Masculine stands will be powerful and bold. Large legs and straightlines will help outline large solid surface area for holding the powerful tree.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2009, 12:30 PM by akeppler »
 

akeppler

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2009, 12:23 PM »
Feminine tables like informal tables will have smooth curving legs and straight sided legs will be understated. Graceful and flowing are words to describe feminine stands.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2009, 12:31 PM by akeppler »
 

akeppler

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2009, 05:15 PM »
Now we begin to delve into the more subjective part of display. As we move into this area we start to work more with what we have rather than what we want. Our choices will be dictated by what is available in our area and what we can afford based on our pocket book.  

Of course the perfect scenario is to have a pot made for a tree and a stand made for the tree and pot as a unit. This means that the tree and pot and stand will remain together for as long as possible to get the most bang for the buck. I have read articles in International Bonsai where Bill Valavanis was able to repurchase a certain Tokoname pot for a tree that had outgrown the previous one. He was able to purchase the same shape and color there by at least maintaining that same look eventhough a new stand would have to be built to accomodate the new larger pot.


While it might be very time consuming to write an entire article on how to match tree to pot to stand we might take one tree and look at it and make a certain determination if I were correct in my assesment on one tree I have posted in particular. I was able to find an older picture of it on a different stand and I felt it much better composition. I will post them here for review. You folks choose which stand bolsters the awesome power of this pine.


(ed.note there is three months between these photos. The bottom picture is the latest)
« Last Edit: June 21, 2009, 05:17 PM by akeppler »
 

akeppler

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2009, 11:48 PM »
Now you understand why I said we have reached the subjective part of display. I like the second stand with this tree. The top stand for me has very intricate legs and curves which are not repeated in the tree. In fact there is not one curve in that tree. So for me the tree has a formal image. The stand on top looks rather informal. I like the formal straight sided legs that are massive enough to carry the weight of this tree.

Just my opinion, and I respect yours, because if we all agreed they would only need to make about 10 stand designs ;D
« Last Edit: June 21, 2009, 11:50 PM by akeppler »
 

akeppler

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2009, 01:19 PM »
Those kind of stands are considered freeform and have to be used under the right conditions. The stand design is so powerful that it can detract from the visual composition. It takes  a really powerful tree to achieve harmony.

Like pots that type of stand may be better served as a collectable.
 

Victrinia Ridgeway

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2009, 11:13 AM »
omg... I don't think I've seen so much tree stand porn in my life... it's wonderful... the article is marvelous. When I think I have a clue... I'll ask questions. Mostly this is the best thread on tables I've ever seen.

With gratitude,

Victrinia
 

davestree

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2009, 04:50 PM »
Thanks for the great information, this is very useful.
 

bonsaiTom

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2011, 05:54 AM »
I just wanted to bring this discussion out of the archives. It's show time again and a review of display stands is so appropriate.

I'd love to hear again from Victrinia on this topic. Any new input?  More tree stand porn?
« Last Edit: May 11, 2011, 05:56 AM by bonsaiTom »
 

DougB

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2014, 11:54 AM »
YUP time to bring this out of the rusty, dusty cellar. 
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #24 on: October 04, 2014, 02:47 PM »
Those kind of stands are considered freeform and have to be used under the right conditions. The stand design is so powerful that it can detract from the visual composition. It takes  a really powerful tree to achieve harmony.

Like pots that type of stand may be better served as a collectable.

That second stand, the low table is absolutely exquisite, truly marvelous. Who made it? That is a stand I would love to own. I think it is subtle enough that it could be used, though you are right, matching a tree to it would be difficult. Perhaps a satsuki in glorious bloom, that would be a tree the stand would not over power. 
 

akeppler

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #25 on: October 04, 2014, 09:59 PM »

That second stand, the low table is absolutely exquisite, truly marvelous. Who made it? That is a stand I would love to own. I think it is subtle enough that it could be used, though you are right, matching a tree to it would be difficult. Perhaps a satsuki in glorious bloom, that would be a tree the stand would not over power. 

I made both stands
 

Judy

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #26 on: October 05, 2014, 08:21 AM »


I made both stands

And a really great and inspirational blog post about how the stands are made.  There is a lot of work going into these!!!
http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/display-stands/
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #27 on: October 05, 2014, 09:20 AM »
This is a really effective post.  Forums aren't always the best way to convey info but this is pretty solid. 
 

Adair M

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #28 on: October 05, 2014, 01:38 PM »
I agree, Owen, great thread. I wish there were more like this.
 

FARHF

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Re: Choosing a shoku
« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2015, 08:24 AM »
Irene, I will try to include some photo's of what designates some of the more easy to determine styles. This is by no means a really conclusive list nor does it mean that just by includeing the appropriate stand your display will win. It will go along ways towards keeping points being deducted and that may be all that is necessary.

In a artist profile done a few years back at AoB I talked about the need to improve how we choose the right table for a tree and the need to get it tree appropriate. I think we are moving in that direction as I see tree table matches improve every year.
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First the Japanese stand. Mostly subdued and simple. Feet will usually turn outwards. Like bonsai pots, stands started in China. Japan took off with the idea and improved as well as simplified the lines. Sometimes  Japanese stands will carry a sumari or fuedal flavor which can be very powerful with the right tree.

Most antique stands were Chinese or Japanese writing tables. Much like the small plastic table we give our kids while sick in bed to take their supper. Japanese children would sit on the floor and place this writing desk over their legs to study. Many of the tables became bonsai stands from necessity since they did not have tree specific tables. Many would just cut the legs down to make a lower table.
thanks y post,y post so helpful
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