Bonsai Study Group Forum

Presentation => Bonsai Shows Discussion => Topic started by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:06 AM

Title: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:06 AM
Here are the trees that were on display at this year's Carolina Bonsai Expo.  There were some stellar trees, as I believe you'll see.  Enough with the introductions

These pictures are out of order, and I've misplaced my flyer mapping #'s to species.  I'll update when I've found 'em.

70) Trident Maple, Acer beurgerianum
69) Japanese White Pine, Pinus parviflora
68) Chinese Elm, Ulmus Parvifolia
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:07 AM
67) Hinoki Cypress - Chamaecyparis obtusa cv.
66) Shimpaku Juniper - Juniperus chinensis 'Shimpaku'
65) Japanese Black Pine - Pinus thunbergii
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:08 AM
64) Firethorn - Pyracantha angustifolia
63) Shimpaku Juniper - Juniperus chinensis 'Shimpaku'

Wall of Shohin
Black Creek Bonsai Study Group
42) Japanese Maple - Acer palmatum
43) Shimpaku Juniper - Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
44) Japanese Mountain Azalea - Rhododendron kiusianum
45) Golden Star Jasmine - Trachelospermum jasminoides
46) Korean Boxwood - Buxus microphylla
47) Winged Elm - Ulmus alata
48) Chalk Maple - Acer leucoderme
49) Japanese Maple - Acer palmatum
50) Zelkova - Zelkova serrata
51) Dwarf Erodium - Erodium reichardi
52) Crape Myrtle - Lagerstroemia indica ‘Chickasaw’
53) Wintercreeper - Euonymus fortunei
54) Trident Maple - Acer buergerianum
55) Crabapple - Malus sp.
56) Chinese Elm - Ulmus parvifolia
57) Bluets - Houstonia caerulea
58) Japanese Five Needle Pine - Pinus parviflora
59) Satsuki Azalea - Rhododendron indicum cv.
60) Japanese Mountain Azalea - Rhododendron kiusianum
61) Shimpaku Juniper - Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:09 AM
More
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:10 AM
Trees
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:10 AM
35. Scotch pine – Pinus sylvestris
36. Pear – Pyrus sp.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:12 AM
31. Carolina Hornbeam – Carpinus caroliniana
32. Dwarf Garden Juniper – Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’
33. Swamp Rose – Rosa palustris
34. Baldcypress – Taxodium distichum
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:13 AM
25. Dwarf Garden Juniper – Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’ / Dwarf Garden Juniper – juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’ / Shimpaku Juniper – Juniperus chinenses ‘Shimpaku’ / Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii
26. Boxwood – Buxus sp.
27. Crape myrtle – Lagerstroemia sp.
28. Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii
29. Crabapple – Malus sp.
30. Crape myrtle – Lagerstroemia sp.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:13 AM
11. Korin Azalea – Rhododendron cv.
12. Ponderosa Pine – Pinus ponderosa
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:14 AM
9. Japanese White Pine – Pinus parvifolia cv.
10. Miniature Display - Japanese White Pine, Silverberry – Elaeagnus angustifolia / Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii, Hinoki Falsecypress – Chamaecyparis obtusa cv.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:15 AM
4. Kingsville Boxwood – Buxus microphylla ‘Kingsville Dwarf’
5. Shimpaku Juniper – Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
6. Trident Maple – Acer buergerianum
7. Buttonbush – Cephalanthus occidentalis
8. Ponderosa Pine – Pinus ponderosa
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:16 AM
1. Satsuki Azalea – Rhododendron cv.
2. Dwarf Garden Juniper – Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’
3. Japanese Beech – Fagus crenata
4. Kingsville Boxwood – Buxus microphylla ‘Kingsville Dwarf’
24. Garden Juniper – Juniperus procumbens
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:28 AM
21. Trident Maple – Acer buergerianum cv.
22. Sargent’s Juniper – Juniper sargentii
23. Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii cv.
24. Garden Juniper – Juniperus procumbens
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:29 AM
15. Shimpaku Juniper – Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
16. ‘Mikawa’ Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii ‘Mikawa’
17. Coastal Redwood – Sequoia sempervirens
18. Shimpaku Juniper  -Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
19. Unidetified
20. European Beech – Fagus sylvatica
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:29 AM
15. Shimpaku Juniper – Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
16. ‘Mikawa’ Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii ‘Mikawa’
17. Coastal Redwood – Sequoia sempervirens
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:31 AM
13. Black Pine – Pinus thunbergii
14. Kingsville Boxwood – Buxus microphylla ‘Kingsville Dwarf’
15. Shimpaku Juniper – Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:31 AM
37. Korean Boxwood - Buxus microphylla ‘Wintergreen’
39. Dwarf Garden Juniper - Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’
40. Chinese Lacebark Elm - Ulmus parvifolia
41. Hinoki Falsecypress - Chamaecyparis obtusa cv.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:33 AM
38. American Larch - Larix laricina
72. Dwarf Alberta Spruce - Picea glauca
73. Chinese wisteria  - Wisteria sinensis
74. Dwarf Garden Juniper – Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’
75. Eastern Redcedar - Juniperus virginiana
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:33 AM
71. Winged Elm - Ulmus alata
90. Weeping Fig - Ficus benjamina
91. Shimpaku Juniper - Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
92. Colorado Blue Spruce - Picea pungens ‘Glauca’
93. Cork Bark Elm - Ulmus propinqua 'Suberosa'
94. Weeping Fig - Ficus benjamina 'Wiandi'
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:34 AM
89. European Hornbeam – Carpinus betulus
90. Weeping Fig - Ficus benjamina
91. Shimpaku Juniper - Juniperus chinensis ‘Shimpaku’
92. Colorado Blue Spruce - Picea pungens ‘Glauca’
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:35 AM
86. Shimpaku Juniper – Juniperus chinensis  ‘Shimpaku’
87. Winged Euonymus – Euonymus alatus
88. Japanese Maple – Acer palmatum
89. European Hornbeam – Carpinus betulus
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:35 AM
83. Trumpet Vine - Campsis radicans
84. Trident Maple - Acer buergerianum
85. Japanese White Pine – Pinus parviflora
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:36 AM
81. Snow Rose - Serissa Foetida
82. Chinese Elm - Ulmus parvifolia
83. Trumpet Vine - Campsis radicans
84. Trident Maple - Acer buergerianum
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:37 AM
78. Japanese Maple – Acer palmatum
79. Japanese Maple - Acer palmatum
80. Japanese Maple - Acer palmatum
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:37 AM
I'll have to upload a close-up/crop of this scroll.  The orange objects in the scroll are (trident?) maple leaves falling.

76. Trident Maple – Acer buergerianum
77. Pyracantha - Pyracantha angustifolia
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:38 AM
Suiseki
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:39 AM
Suiseki
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:42 AM
Suiseki & Bonsai.

Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:43 AM
The NC Arboretum's display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:44 AM
Arboretum's display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:44 AM
Arboretum's display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:45 AM
Arboretum's display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:46 AM
Arboretum
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:47 AM
Arboretum's display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:48 AM
Arboretum's display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:48 AM
Arboretum's bonsai display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:49 AM
Arboretum's bonsai display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:50 AM
Arboretum's bonsai display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 09:51 AM
Arboretum's bonsai display
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 11, 2010, 09:57 AM
Wow, thanks for sharing these!  Some great looking trees and dislpays.  I'm particularly fond of the formal shohin display, #10.

That being said, the numbers are terribly distracting.  Did you get that sense in person?  Perhaps next year they could be more subtle?

Also, some of the displays appear to be waaaaay too crowded.  Did you get that sense in person? 

Were there any critiques this year?  Any thoughts and/or pointers to share?

Lots of work went into taking these photos and sharing them.  Thanks again.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: Steven on October 11, 2010, 10:08 AM
Thanks Wayne for sharing. Good pics. I see alot of trees from the MABK show there. Now they got double exposure on here LOL. Would've been great if I could have attended. Maybe next yr :)
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 11, 2010, 01:16 PM
Matsu, to me, the numbers weren't terribly distracting, but I agree it would've been cleaner without them.  The Shohin wall display handled it pretty well by having a diagram where the numbers are given.  I wonder how easily that could be incorporated by the other groups.

The crowdedness is an issue, and I recall similar comments last year.  Some clubs feel that more is better.  From personal experience, I've come to realize its also difficult limiting the number of trees when putting a display together.

David Easterbrook was the guest artist this year and there's always a critique, usually on Sunday morning.  Since my group didn't participate in showing any trees this year, I was unable to attend the critique.  Hopefully others that did attend will be able to comment.

I'm also eager to learn who won the awards.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 12, 2010, 10:57 AM
Since this thread hasn't fostered the discussion I'd hoped it would, I'll weigh in.

I thought overall, the level of development/refinement of the trees improved from previous years.  As was previously discussed (http://bonsaistudygroup.com/bonsai-shows-competitions-and-displays/carolina-bonsai-expo-2010/), novel methods of display are encouraged, and this year saw more clubs displaying trees non-traditionally.

One club that has always taken up the mantle of non-traditional display did not disappoint in that regard this year.  The group out of the middle part of the state (of SC) (their name seems to change year-to-year.  maybe they've settled on one now?) brought in a wall of shohin.  It was impressive to see, and luckily there was plenty of room around the display to really showcase it.

There were no scrolls, no elaborate stands, and few accents.  It was very outside the box.  Hopefully, I don't offend anyone with my comments, but I'd like to offer a few observations.

The trees were roughly of equal size.  There were a few smaller trees and a few larger trees, ...but all shohin (or smaller).  While I understand that this group usually chooses a theme for their display, it seemed like by making the display such a feature of the display (follow me here), that trying to say much more (by having the trees all the same size) complicated things a little.  I believe it could've been more impactful if the trees had a little more variety, ...or at least having one tree becoming the feature tree (red circle).

Also, the grouping seemed very geometrical.  Split into quadrants (yellow lines), each seemed to have about as many trees/weight as the others.  There didn't seem to be a lot of negative space ...except above dead-center.

That was complicated by the apparent lines (green lines) all leading to one focal point (red circle).

I did appreciate the displays within the display.  Some of the pictures I posted show them, but the mame display in the bottom of the upper-right quadrant was superb.

Hopefully the picture will clear up what my words left unclear.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 12, 2010, 11:05 AM
Did you ever find your program (or whatever was missing)?  I'm curious if there was any mention of the reason behind the display.  I would like to know a little more about it, and what went into this particular display.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 12, 2010, 11:08 AM
I'm also curious to know more about the blue top dressing, shot glass "stand", and draped cloth?


(http://bonsaistudygroup.com/bonsai-shows-competitions-and-displays/carolina-bonsai-expo-2010-pictures/?action=dlattach;attach=7574;image)
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: johng on October 12, 2010, 12:47 PM
Interesting thoughts Wayne...thanks for your time in posting and thinking/writing

forget the quadrants and the diagonal lines radiating from a central point...never considered

Look for triangular relationships...there are many...some planned, some not...some adjacent and some not

there are no "primary" focal points(which might be an issue)...we hoped for something that let your eye flow from top to bottom and side to side...area to area...if you try to take it all in in just one glance it will not work...you have to slow down and purposefully view the entire display to see it all. 

The other thing that I saw happening in terms of viewing over the weekend was that you needed to back away from display to really appreciate it...I think that is the difference in viewing trees and viewing a larger display..I think most people are conditioned to look only at the trees and not the whole.  Think about a tokonoma...you sit back away from the display..its not about getting close and looking at the intricacies of the tree, scroll or accessory...its about taking in the entire display.  Last year we forced viewers to back away from our display by placing some lighting boxes about 6 feet away...veiwers were limited to viewing from beyond the boxes...this had two noticeable effects.  First, people saw the display...recognized and appreciated the theme.  Second, they griped because they could not get close enough to see the details of the tree.  This year we made the decision to bring the viewers closer again..mainly to see the smaller trees...I think this move back fired in terms of appreciating the whole.

As to size...since everything was about 12" or less it is difficult to differentiate...We spent a lot of time on this during the design phase. I might suggest that you could take this further than just looking at height and think about visual mass...I think you will find significant variation in spite of the similarity in heights.

I am including two pics...
the first is a little different way of looking at the visual mass
the second...negative space.

Thanks,
John


Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Kirby on October 12, 2010, 05:40 PM
John, I hope that the displays had the effect on folks that the artists were looking. Very nice group of trees displayed throughout, and in the arboretum. Cheers, John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: johng on October 12, 2010, 07:50 PM
Thanks John!

John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 12, 2010, 08:07 PM
forget the quadrants and the diagonal lines radiating from a central point...never considered

I think that's what I was saying.  Regardless of whether you guys considered it, its all I could see in the display.

Quote
Look for triangular relationships...there are many...some planned, some not...some adjacent and some not
As I mentioned, there were some nice displays within the display.  I particularly liked:
(http://bonsaistudygroup.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=857.0;attach=7460;image) and (http://bonsaistudygroup.com/bonsai-shows-competitions-and-displays/carolina-bonsai-expo-2010-pictures/?action=dlattach;attach=7461;image)

Quote
there are no "primary" focal points(which might be an issue)...we hoped for something that let your eye flow from top to bottom and side to side...area to area...if you try to take it all in in just one glance it will not work...you have to slow down and purposefully view the entire display to see it all.

Again, all I see are lines leading to a tree that's not dissimilar from the others. 

Quote
As to size...since everything was about 12" or less it is difficult to differentiate...We spent a lot of time on this during the design phase. I might suggest that you could take this further than just looking at height and think about visual mass...I think you will find significant variation in spite of the similarity in heights.

Again, I mentioned earlier that since the novelty of the display was such a feature of the display (sorry for my circuitous description), making the display shohin-only added a level of complexity (not sure that's the right word) that I'm not sure added to the display.  I think in this case, some variation of sizes would've alleviated the appearance (to me?) of lines, ...or adding a feature tree that's of a different size might benefit the display as well.

Quote
I am including two pics...
the first is a little different way of looking at the visual mass
the second...negative space.

The first still just highlights the linear placement of the trees.
The second shows how evenly they're placed in the quadrants.



I liked the display.  I hope that this post doesn't confuse the issue.  I'm just clarifying what I said (or meant to say?) in my previous post.  I wasn't interpreting the display, or offering a means of interpretations, but pointing out what became obvious to me after taking the display in for several minutes.  Those same things translated into the photographs as well (I was wondering if it'd be similarly obvious in photographs).  It certainly made a statement, but I thought a few changes would improve the message. 
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: johng on October 12, 2010, 08:45 PM
Thanks for the feedback Wayne....food for thought for the next time.  I do hope your club will be joining in the next time.  Walter is coming.  From one extreme to the other.  Seems like a perfect opportunity for some creative displays..I can't wait to see what the clubs come up with.

John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: Dano on October 13, 2010, 09:49 PM
John and Ken,

You two always make us proud to be bonsai enthusiasts in South Carolina.  Many us us would love to take a few classes from both you and Ken.

Dan O'Neal
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: johng on October 14, 2010, 01:48 PM
Thanks Dan!!! 

John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: ken duncan on October 14, 2010, 05:20 PM
Thank You Dan.
Ken
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: ken duncan on October 15, 2010, 03:01 PM
After reading some of the comments here and hearing thoughts from different people at the Expo, I thought I would try and explain how about two years ago John and I started with this idea.
There were three main goals that we started out with. First, show trees from every member in the group. Second show as many trees  as possible with out it being to cluttered. Third, keep all of the trees under 12" tall. We knew that this would be hard to pull off but we both love a challenge.
In past displays we tried to keep the number of trees to a minimum to give an open and uncluttered feeling. We have always felt that it is important to have a wide range of heights, styles, types of trees, color etc., to give variety and interest. We also feel that the best trees possible should be used.
This was an evolution of ideas that changed many times as we talked about how to overcome the many obvious problems. First, how do you show twenty trees on a twelve foot long table with out it being to busy looking? We decided to go vertical so we could have layers. What trees will look good when they are placed up high? How do you make the trees stand out and show off each one? We came up with a light color background and suspended shelves. How do you keep variety in height when the trees are 12" to 3" tall and most of the fifty of so trees we had to choose from are 6" tall and we were use to dealing with trees from 40" to 3" in a display? How do you make it flow? These are just a few of the problems and questions that came up.
With these kinds of problems the only thing to do was to compromise. The trees would not be the best that we had. The range in heights could not be that different so we tried to use the location of the trees along with different masses, colors, styles and types of trees to show a variety. There would not be a lot of open space and so on.
When someone creates art they can not control how someone sees or interprets it, you can only have control over how you view it and if it pleases you. I did not ever see nor do I now see this display as looking through a gun site with radiating lines but I see it as a sinuous movement of layers of hill tops and relationships between different trees. Maybe that is just me.
There was a comment made to me at the Expo from a professional photographer who said that the display gave him a very calm feeling and he related to me how what he had learned about composition in photography was used in a very effective way in the display.
There is not a main focus in this display as in most of the displays at the Expo, to me you start looking at the tree or group of trees that catch your eye and your eye moves from there and hopefully keeps moving with in the display for a while finding different relationships with different trees.
I do not know if we accomplished all of our goals but I do think that after a lot of brainstorming and many hours of work we did our best, although I do feel that we could have done some things different, there is always room for improvement in everything.
What do we do next year?
Ken
 
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: AJ on October 16, 2010, 04:49 PM
Ken - I enjoyed reading your comments about the thought and work invested in the Black Creek Study Group display. You usually are not inclined to write so much! Anyone who saw the display in person would know how much effort went into it, because it was really an excellent piece of work. I returned many times during the weekend to look at it and study the individual bonsai, and contemplate the arrangement of all its parts. As a creative attempt to expand the boundaries of bonsai display, which is encouraged at this show, it was a great success. There were several strong creative efforts put forth by the various clubs, all of them worthy of admiration but most falling just a little short of the goal. Still, I'd much rather see a show done that way than one where everyone feels compelled to adhere to the traditional methods. People were being expressive, being creative, and that's a stimulating atmosphere to experience. Thanks to you and John and the other Black Creek members for making such an enjoyable contribution.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 16, 2010, 10:37 PM
Thanks for all the great information and description, guys.  Sounds like a lot of thought and effort went into it, and a lot of fun had, too!

Congrats.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: ken duncan on October 18, 2010, 06:59 AM
Thank You Arthur for making a place for innovation in Bonsai.

You are welcome John, and it was a lot of fun as always.

Ken   
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 21, 2010, 10:56 AM
Another innovative display shown @ this year's expo was the effort of a club that was new to participating at the show.  You can see a (the?) portion of the display that I thought was unique below:
(http://bonsaistudygroup.com/bonsai-shows-competitions-and-displays/carolina-bonsai-expo-2010-pictures/?action=dlattach;attach=7482;image)

I really liked how the trees were staged and staggered.  I thought the use of natural/rugged looking materials was also fitting.  The trees will improve with time, but most seemed to be of the appropriate form for their placement in the display.  The small accent, on the other-colored block of wood, right above the #25 looks out of place, but that may be a matter of taste on my part.  The display doesn't seem to suffer any with that block/accent removed any, and its possible that it could've been used elsewhere.

I liked this display/grouping ...until I got to the pinnacle of the display.
(http://bonsaistudygroup.com/bonsai-shows-competitions-and-displays/carolina-bonsai-expo-2010-pictures/?action=dlattach;attach=7486;image)

Would anyone care to decipher the theme or message of this display?  Even better if someone from this club could offer their reasoning for placing a dead tree so prominently.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 21, 2010, 12:35 PM
As usual, I thought the quality of the bonsai improved yet again. Over the years there have been some good trees, but they are becoming more numerous as time goes on. Always an enjoyable event.

Concerning the guest artist's critique; suffice it to say, "think Japanese emphasis",  and you can get a good grasp on it. That's not being critical, just objective. To each their own.

Our particular display was going to only have three (possibly four) larger trees, but two club members who had never shown a bonsai in the Expo before, began to show interest. As a club, this is a great thing, and you can bet we nurtured that interest. We ended up with five bonsai and it did change the set up from the original plan. Personally, I was happy about it.

The "Columbia Boys" did what they always do and designed a quality display. It was "outside the box"  so-to-speak, but I find that very refreshing. I appreciate quality bonsai as much as anyone, but this is a CLUB/GROUP competition. In my opinion some sort of overall effect must encompass all of that club's bonsai. To stray from traditional Japanese tastes will always draw some criticism, but it also helps bonsaists in the U.S. start to establish their own style of bonsai and events, just like the rest of the world has the opportunity to do. A couple of years back our club did something that was vocally called "trailer-trash" by an individual at the event. Did I like that? No. Still, I couldn't legally ask him to step outside and say it, so it went in the category of different tastes for different people. I'm good with that.

I would hope that anyone who ever attends the Expo will go there with the understanding that each bonsai is their on it's own merit BUT the Club/Group presentation is the main emphasis of the event.

P.S. I though Jim Doyle's "swinesai" was funny as hell. I like to see that kind of humor. Uppity, cynical types are not my cup of tea.





 
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 21, 2010, 12:52 PM
P.S. I though Jim Doyle's "swinesai" was funny as hell. I like to see that kind of humor. Uppity, cynical types are not my cup of tea.

(http://bonsaistudygroup.com/bonsai-shows-competitions-and-displays/carolina-bonsai-expo-2010-pictures/?action=dlattach;attach=7580;image)

Those are pig figures around the base of and spread thru the scene.  There was also a note (thats washed out/overexposed in the photo that denotes this as "Swinesai".)
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Kirby on October 22, 2010, 12:20 PM
Uppity cynical types? Hmm.

Interesting displays, the swinesai is a fun exhibit. A little levity can be uplifting at shows. At the BIB show this year, Boon's "Pandora" landscape was displayed with a little blue person (Navi?), an Avatar Movie character, on the display. Lot's of laughs and further reinforced the humor of the project, which was completed by an Intensive Class with Boon. If the overall feeling is good, good trees, weeded and pots cleaned, nice display environment, why not have some fun. But not sure it needs to be put out as a challenge, as if you don't like this you are not a real "American".
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: akeppler on October 24, 2010, 01:42 PM
Wow! Tough crowd.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 25, 2010, 08:14 AM
Uppity cynical types? Hmm.

Interesting displays, the swinesai is a fun exhibit. A little levity can be uplifting at shows. At the BIB show this year, Boon's "Pandora" landscape was displayed with a little blue person (Navi?), an Avatar Movie character, on the display. Lot's of laughs and further reinforced the humor of the project, which was completed by an Intensive Class with Boon. If the overall feeling is good, good trees, weeded and pots cleaned, nice display environment, why not have some fun. But not sure it needs to be put out as a challenge, as if you don't like this you are not a real "American".

Yes, uppity cynical types are not my cup of tea. I am speaking of those who are not only critical of chance-takers, but downright insultive of them. I've seen this too many times and it unfortunately has the negative effect of steering people AWAY from bonsai. That is counter-productiive to the art. Criticism is synonymous with learning, but the delivery is so important. Constructive mannerisms will almost always be readily accepted. I find they are usually a trait in individuals who look at new, untested attempts and try to see the good before they criticize the bad. This can only be experienced if the attempts are actually made. The "uppity, cynical types" I am referring to are the ones who blatantly ignore anything out of the norm at best, and go off on a tangent at worst.

John, with all due respect, isn't the Expo truly a club CHALLENGE? Certainly a polite and fun weekend, but still a competition? Let's imagine a guideline where five tokonoma are provided for each club, and they must use those with five bonsai. Would that improve the show? Would that provoke artistic efforts? Would that "stir the blood"? In my opinion, it would not be an improvement over the current guidlines which are decidedly generous to say the least.

Let me say I am proud to be an American. I cherish that in my life with a zeal that I can't put into words. Having qualified that, let me also say I would hope any other citizen of any another country would feel the same way. I don't put myself above anyone else. At the same time, I  believe that the U.S. needs to do in bonsai what we do with most everything else we get involved with; approach it in our own way based on our perceptions and ideas. Never meant to insult others, just adding to what has been done before. Supplementing, not re-inventing.

Have a great week.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 25, 2010, 09:20 AM

Yes, uppity cynical types are not my cup of tea. I am speaking of those who are not only critical of chance-takers, but downright insultive of them. I've seen this too many times and it unfortunately has the negative effect of steering people AWAY from bonsai. That is counter-productiive to the art. Criticism is synonymous with learning, but the delivery is so important. Constructive mannerisms will almost always be readily accepted.

I'm sorry, I have to disagree.  All too often people's egos get in the way.  They expect to be commended simply for trying something new and different, ignoring the fact of if it worked or not.  When any criticism (constructive or not) is offered then the ego is wounded and more often then not lash out at those willing to comment.

I wish it weren't so.  This is a discussion board, one focused on studying the art of bonsai, together.  I wish more people would put their egos aside and be open and willing to learn from one another and have more discussion.  I know I still learn something new every day, and I hope that never changes.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 25, 2010, 09:39 AM

Yes, uppity cynical types are not my cup of tea. I am speaking of those who are not only critical of chance-takers, but downright insultive of them. I've seen this too many times and it unfortunately has the negative effect of steering people AWAY from bonsai. That is counter-productiive to the art. Criticism is synonymous with learning, but the delivery is so important. Constructive mannerisms will almost always be readily accepted.

I'm sorry, I have to disagree.  All too often people's egos get in the way.  They expect to be commended simply for trying something new and different, ignoring the fact of if it worked or not.  When any criticism (constructive or not) is offered then the ego is wounded and more often then not lash out at those willing to comment.

I wish it weren't so.  This is a discussion board, one focused on studying the art of bonsai, together.  I wish more people would put their egos aside and be open and willing to learn from one another and have more discussion.  I know I still learn something new every day, and I hope that never changes.

And while you disagree with me, I do agree with you. Yes, an ego will get in the way of learning. Where we might not quite see this the same way is while you are inferring the ego of the person receiving the critique, I would add the ego of the person DOING the critique.

Ironically, we - as a whole - seem to see ego in the one as a detriment, yet readily accept it from the other.   
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 25, 2010, 09:42 AM
Good point, and well taken.  Its when either ego gets in the way and shouts down the other.  Then the conversation ends and the learning stops.  Then we all lose.



Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 25, 2010, 09:47 AM
Good point, and well taken.  Its when either ego gets in the way and shouts down the other.  Then the conversation ends and the learning stops.  Then we all lose.





I could not agree more! It's the old saying about when it comes to the mouth and ear(s); only one works at a time.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: akeppler on October 27, 2010, 12:33 AM
Hi guys, I don't post here much, but this thread has peaked some curiosity for me due to the word "display" coming up a few times. While I know each of the participants in the more heated part via the internet over a period of years, I hope we can exchange a few ideas.  Display has been a passion for me over the years. It has progressed at a more rapid rate over the past five, and has grown by leaps and bounds over the last two years with my participation in a National kazari competition. I feel I have challanged myself with the best of them, displaying against my teacher, Katsumi Kinoshita as well as Boon, Jim Gremel, Hidecko Metaxis, Ted Matson, Kenji Miyata, Peter Tea and many more you probably don't know. This year I placed second and took home $1000.00 in my pocket. I think this qualifies me to speak of display in America.

I belong to four clubs. They all have annual exhibits of their trees. All of the exhibits are crowded, all are complete with high level as well as mid level displayers. Mostly they have beginner level displayers that feel each of their creations are just as beautiful as those that are actually producing some art. I have no problem with this and find myself fully engaged trying to take those less learned to a higher level. That is what the club experience is all about.

Where the problems start to arise is when those higher up within the clubs try to take the club exhibit to a higher place, it becomes bogged down with what to do with those trees that suffer asthetically and not bruise all thos ego's. Most club shows exhibit a syndrome I like to call "Stuffing 40 pounds of pork into a 5 pound sausage casing". Stuffing trees together into 20 inch increments is not artistic. To argue otherwise is just fooling no one.

What those in charge of the venue have to do is use some guidelines on how the trees can be set up. It is not un democratic to expect people to hold to some sort of aesthetic. For instance in my more formal club I belong to which is a Japanese club of which I am President, we have space problems also, but if a tree comes on display day with out the appropriate stand it does not get displayed. Further, trees have showed up with a flat stone to be used as a stand, and the teacher, (Sensei) will come by and remove the stone and then ask who belongs to the tree. Either a correct stand is used, or borrowed or the tree goes home.

This does two things

1. It keeps everyone on the same level. We understand that some may only have three really good trees that come with stands and have a high level of artistry, and that a beginner may wish to display 7 average trees with no stands. We would rather they limit themselves to the best tree they have, borrow a stand, and show a good representation of how bonsai should look.

2. It provides for the understanding that though they wish to display everything they own, that for the good of the whole display, it may be better to limit the amount of trees and hold the exhibit to a higher standard.

This is not an easy thing to do in a club environment. I know this as my other clubs suffer from this problem also. The difference being my club is Japanese, the other clubs are westerners with attitudes, egos and you can't tell me what I can't exhibit. I suppose no one here has ever heard that....right?

I think the exhibit was a good one. It had a huge diverse range of species and a huge wall of shohin. To argue that there was artistry within the wall of shohin is allowing an ego to peek thru. It was a good way to deal with a huge amount of trees and not hurt any feelings. Kudu's for building it and making it work. Please don't try to defend it as art though. The green boxes and redline negative space is almost laughable.

In my opinion, it will be a very large task in next years exhibit on how to pare down the amount of trees and allow the exhibit to breath. If anyone feels that it is fun to see an exhibit that is crowded you are delusional. It is sensory overload and people get very distracted and actually hurry along because it gets so boring very fast.

I hope I haven't stepped on any toes with my remarks, and hope to see this better next year.

Best, Al
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: akeppler on October 27, 2010, 12:40 AM
My second place Kazari entry.

Titled: Morning Meditaion
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: johng on October 27, 2010, 07:41 AM
Gosh Master Al, there is not one tiny bit of arrogance or ego in that post!!

For the record neither Ken nor I have claimed The Wall as art a single time.  We didn't post the pictures or start the "conversation."

My mistake was trying to explain our intentions and give context to our effort in response to an arm chair quarterback critique...of course, he has a right to his opinion...informed or not.  And who would dare to think that there would be any value in making the process transparent?

I do find it disingenuous that on a struggling forum where the mods constantly try to spur discussion and beg for input that the only response to Ken's explanation in the process we went through in creating The Wall was from Arthur....maybe you mods should think about that a little?

Just so you know Mr. Calloway...you, and your members, will not have to be annoyed by my ego on this forum anymore...Maybe its arrogant to even think that you were talking about me, but nonetheless I am finished here.

Thanks and good luck to you all!
John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 27, 2010, 08:06 AM
Al,

 Step on any toes, huh? Well, I just ordered some steel toe boots so I guess I can reply.

I find it very interesting that you remark about your rigidly Japanese club maintaining an apparent mandate on how to display, but refer to Western-style clubs as having an ego when they declare they wish to display in their own way. Did I also see you use the word un-democratic in there somewhere? Speaking for myself, that looks like there is plenty of ego on both sides.

Your obsession with formal displays - and specifically stands - is quite understandable. As I recall you MAKE stands don't you? Absolutely nothing wrong with that, and I am not saying your perspective is flawed; just that it is not the only one.

Do you remember a critique you made of a rock planting I did with shimpaku on featherstone a number of years back? You were rather critical of it, especially the fact that you did not feel the rock was "rugged" enough to mimic a mountain area. You posted one of your efforts that showed a single tree on a very tall slender rock with sharp fissures as one that accomplished the visual impact you felt was needed. Well, you were right - for YOUR area. As I said at the time, my influence is from THIS area - the Appalachian mountains. My composition was based on that perspective, and many people who have seen it, in person, remark that it reminds them of an area in our mountain ranges.

Personally, I have no desire to observe display after display of bonsai that have to be matched with a stand and a scroll. I like them, but I prefer a little more variety in how the bonsai are displayed. While I will never have the monetary means to visit the {quote} "big" shows {end quote}, I find that the Carolina Bonsai Expo is increasing in popularity at a substantial rate. Something is obviously going right with it.

I'd like to think that the Expo is a positive influence to the average person who has an interest in learning about bonsai, but is turned away by the stuffy elitism that is sometimes confused with the term "traditionist". Of all the good experiences I have had with bonsai, that attitude is the one dark corner that refuses to come into the light. 

Ego indeed.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 27, 2010, 08:09 AM
Gosh Master Al, there is not one tiny bit of arrogance or ego in that post!!

For the record neither Ken nor I have claimed The Wall as art a single time.  We didn't post the pictures or start the "conversation."

My mistake was trying to explain our intentions and give context to our effort in response to an arm chair quarterback critique...of course, he has a right to his opinion...informed or not.  And who would dare to think that there would be any value in making the process transparent?

I do find it disingenuous that on a struggling forum where the mods constantly try to spur discussion and beg for input that the only response to Ken's explanation in the process we went through in creating The Wall was from Arthur....maybe you mods should think about that a little?

Just so you know Mr. Calloway...you, and your members, will not have to be annoyed by my ego on this forum anymore...Maybe its arrogant to even think that you were talking about me, but nonetheless I am finished here.

Thanks and good luck to you all!
John

John, please re-consider your decision. One of the reasons I recently joined in here is because of you, Ken, AJ, and others. You are a very gifted bonsaist, a fun person to be around, and someone I am honored to call a friend. Your input here is invaluable and sought out by many. Please continue to post.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 27, 2010, 08:44 AM
I do find it disingenuous that on a struggling forum where the mods constantly try to spur discussion and beg for input that the only response to Ken's explanation in the process we went through in creating The Wall was from Arthur....maybe you mods should think about that a little?

Just so you know Mr. Calloway...you, and your members, will not have to be annoyed by my ego on this forum anymore...Maybe its arrogant to even think that you were talking about me, but nonetheless I am finished here.

Thanks and good luck to you all!
John


It's Callaway.  I don't think this forum is struggling any more for content than any others out there.  And, I don't believe the mods have had to step in on any post in quite some time.  It's posts such as this that end the conversation.  I'm sorry you took offense to the conversation being had, and hope that you decide to contribute in the future.

Take care.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 27, 2010, 08:44 AM
Al,

Thanks for the thoughtful reply.  I read it with an open mind, and agree with your assessment.  Good luck with your future displays, and I do hope that you will continue to share them here and elsewhere.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Kirby on October 27, 2010, 08:49 AM
Come on folks, I have really enjoyed the conversation, I haven't replied again as I thought I explained my position, I think what you are doing as a group (in NC) is quite interesting, while different than what I tend to do, it is interesting to see the club dynamics at work. For the record, when I talk about display for shows, I am more concerned about how you balance 2 or more trees and an accent of some sort, how you balance the trees, the pots, the stands to make a pleasing composition. (Think of the Mario Komsta Red pine and Hornbeam display at Kokufuten a few years ago). I have personally never shown a tree with a scroll (intentionally), because I am always reminded of what a young friend of Chinese Heritage told me one time- "Be careful of buying pots with Script on them, it may actually say "My dog crapped on your lawn, silly westerner"". While I know that is unlikely, it is always in the back of my mind........
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: bwaynef on October 27, 2010, 10:30 AM
For the record neither Ken nor I have claimed The Wall as art a single time.  We didn't post the pictures or start the "conversation."
Since I did start the post, posted the pictures, and tried to have a conversation with you ...and others, I'll point out that I never said "The Wall" was NOT art (though, after re-reading I'm not sure this comment was directed at me).  Also, I've mentioned here and elsewhere that I enjoyed the display (and if I'm remembering correctly, each time I referred to it).

Quote
My mistake was trying to explain our intentions and give context to our effort in response to an arm chair quarterback critique...of course, he has a right to his opinion...informed or not.  And who would dare to think that there would be any value in making the process transparent?
As the first of the "arm chair quarterbacks", my problem with your initial response was that you were telling me how to interpret something and to forget what was apparent to me, rather than understanding that to me (and possibly others) your interpretation didn't immediately shine through.  Maybe I came off a little more combative than I'd intended in reply to your post.  I'm also not exactly sure what to make of the "informed or not bit" since I never made any assumptions as to your intent.  I believe I prefaced my comments as mere observations.

Quote
I do find it disingenuous that on a struggling forum where the mods constantly try to spur discussion and beg for input that the only response to Ken's explanation in the process we went through in creating The Wall was from Arthur....maybe you mods should think about that a little?
I'll admit to hoping someone else would chime in on their thoughts on The Wall (as well as another display that I posted my thoughts on) but that didn't happen.  It was clear from your posts both here and elsewhere that not a lot of productivity was going to come of any discussion, and maybe I made assumptions or misread it, but Ken's post was starting to feel the same intonation.  Did you want more input from the mods here?

Quote
Just so you know Mr. Calloway...you, and your members, will not have to be annoyed by my ego on this forum anymore...Maybe its arrogant to even think that you were talking about me, but nonetheless I am finished here.

Thanks and good luck to you all!
John

Taking into consideration this last quote, I hope this post isn't seen as me having to have the last word.
Having met Ken and several others of what was once the SC Bonsai club, I've been the recipient of their unwarranted hospitality.  I've never had the pleasure (maybe taken the opportunity is a better way of stating it) of meeting you but regret now that I seem to have offended you.  Its unfortunate (at least for me), particularly with the level of bonsai expertise in SC.

The attached image could use a little more work, but illustrates what a few changes would bring to the display (...for better OR worse).
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 27, 2010, 10:50 AM
I enjoyed the show in the past, I enjoyed it this year, and I will continue to enjoy it in the future.

John and Ken are well-established and respected for their creativity and dedication to the Expo, and their own exhibit. I can't ever think of a display from them I didn't enjoy. Overall, I can't think of a single club display that I didn't find at least some enjoyment in as long as I've been going, and I have serious issues with the way one club fills their display (but that's personal). I am honored to call John, Ken, and AJ my friends; and that all started AT the Carolina Bonsai Expo.

One aspect of our given creative leeway is that we can also view some craftmanship that other club members possess. There are a number of skilled woodworkers who make displays for the Expo, and that is another enjoyable attribute that can be enjoyed and also emulated in our private collections.

There are times when I truly wish I had the means to enjoy other shows, but as time goes on, I'm beginning to understand I am in the best location possible for me to enjoy bonsai as I see perceive it. I wonder if a traditionalist club will enter a display in the coming year that changes my mind? I welcome the opportunity to find out.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: mcpesq817 on October 27, 2010, 11:04 AM
While I think the traditional formal displays, when set up correctly, are gorgeous to look at, I do like seeing alternative displays.  Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't, but it's nice to see people trying new ways to display trees at shows.

Not to mention, not all of us have the time, money or space to acquire the scrolls, stands and accents to make a traditional formal display.  The scrolls and accents may not be too costly and can likely be used in a variety of displays.  On the other hand, traditional stands to me seem to almost need to be custom made for a tree, and the cost of stands can be pretty hard to stomach.  So, for people like me, clubs exploring different display methods is great to see.  For example, I thought the use of acrylic white boxes by Walter Pall in a recent show (and used by others in other shows) was fantastic.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 27, 2010, 11:23 AM
While I think the traditional formal displays, when set up correctly, are gorgeous to look at, I do like seeing alternative displays.  Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't, but it's nice to see people trying new ways to display trees at shows.

Not to mention, not all of us have the time, money or space to acquire the scrolls, stands and accents to make a traditional formal display.  The scrolls and accents may not be too costly and can likely be used in a variety of displays.  On the other hand, traditional stands to me seem to almost need to be custom made for a tree, and the cost of stands can be pretty hard to stomach.  So, for people like me, clubs exploring different display methods is great to see.  For example, I thought the use of acrylic white boxes by Walter Pall in a recent show (and used by others in other shows) was fantastic.

Excellent point about the stands. One recent critique was that a stand and bonsai pot have a very small window of conformity, size-wise. The average bonsai enthusiast would be bankrupt if they tried to meet that requirement with every show-quality bonsai they tried to display. Basically as you said; a custom-made stand for each tree that would not be optimum for another.

 Luckily, compromises are understandable in Asheville!
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: akeppler on October 27, 2010, 07:22 PM
Gosh Master Al, there is not one tiny bit of arrogance or ego in that post!!

 
Thanks and good luck to you all!
John

Thanks for the title. I've earned it.

Since I see that going personal is what happens when you bruise ego's I'll just finish up by telling you and those that worked on your display what you want to hear:

Bravo, This expo has moved bonsai to a new place in contemporary bonsai art. Those around the US should take notice of how true western bonsai display should be done.



yawn, now I remember why I don't post here. I would remove a table or two next year cause by removing the bamboo dividers you can probably pack in 7 or 8 more trees.
Al
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Kirby on October 27, 2010, 08:57 PM
AL,
are still the master of your own domain?

John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: akeppler on October 27, 2010, 09:52 PM
AL,
are still the master of your own domain?

John

Unfortunately I have yet to find a forum that can actually discuss the real art of bonsai display. Of course finding those that actually participate in bonsai display is hard too. I guess the two go hand in hand.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Kirby on October 28, 2010, 06:40 AM
True. But as you have seen over the years, you've been there (on the web) since the beginning, the only real place to discuss fine components of the art and craft of bonsai and display is in person. I think that general concepts can be discussed in a two dimensional time disjointed world, the rest of it is an experience, moving the objects, viewing in the nth dimensional sense. And as we have discussed at the BIB shows, there are a lot of different ways set up individual displays, as long as the flow of the displays, the scale of the objects in the display (Trees, pots, stones, stands, accents, etc) are complimentary in a visual and artistic sense, and good work has been done (if wired, it is done well, trees healthy and appropriately prepared, pots presented in a "clean" (no loose dirt etc) and oiled (If appropriate), stand appropriate, cleaned and maintained, tree without weeds and mossed (or surface of soil cleaned and replaced so that fertilizer, etc, is not apparent. Just doing these things is a big step for many, just seeing these steps as a "requirement" for participating in a show, is good to see.  

I am not sure that we will ever get to the point that a fine historical stand, antique pot, or even the concept of the Tokonma, will be as appreciated here as much as a fine tree, part of it is cultural, but the appreciation of well thought out and set up displays can be. Just my opinion, like everthing else we all have one.
John
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 28, 2010, 07:17 AM
Gosh Master Al, there is not one tiny bit of arrogance or ego in that post!!

 
Thanks and good luck to you all!
John

Thanks for the title. I've earned it.

Since I see that going personal is what happens when you bruise ego's I'll just finish up by telling you and those that worked on your display what you want to hear:

Bravo, This expo has moved bonsai to a new place in contemporary bonsai art. Those around the US should take notice of how true western bonsai display should be done.



yawn, now I remember why I don't post here. I would remove a table or two next year cause by removing the bamboo dividers you can probably pack in 7 or 8 more trees.
Al

That was just plain wrong. Too bad we can't lure you away from the left coast to come show us country boys how it's done.

Good luck with your bonsai stand sales.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: akeppler on October 28, 2010, 08:52 AM
I don't sell stands. Ask a lot of BIB members who wish to commission stands each year I come to the show.

I do know when you need them and which one is appropriate though. I did build 4 stands last year for Kathy Shaners display seminar she gave on Sunday after last years Kazari.


and finally...I will stay on the left coast thank you. I have met and read enough from right coasters that leads me to believe they have nothing left to prove east of the Miss....

Spend some time on the left coast and the talent out here and things are very different.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 28, 2010, 10:08 AM
I don't sell stands. Ask a lot of BIB members who wish to commission stands each year I come to the show.

I do know when you need them and which one is appropriate though. I did build 4 stands last year for Kathy Shaners display seminar she gave on Sunday after last years Kazari.


and finally...I will stay on the left coast thank you. I have met and read enough from right coasters that leads me to believe they have nothing left to prove east of the Miss....

Spend some time on the left coast and the talent out here and things are very different.

You made that too easy, Al. Since you have indicated you have no liking of anything on the right end of the country, I guess we'll not have to worry about your critiques of the Carolina Bonsai Expo anymore.

You might not sell stands now, but I remember at one time you did.  

BTW- you insulted friends of mine who did not deserve it. I don't think you and I will be having a beer-summit anytime soon.

Ultra-conservative mindset from the land of the 9th Circuit. Now that's ironic!
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: MatsuBonsai on October 28, 2010, 11:13 AM
Pretty easy to see that feelings have been hurt and egos bruised.  That's a shame.

I commend those with the courage to try something new, and the open mind to listen honestly to critiques.  I hope to one day visit the Expo and see the trees and hard work in person.

I have seen trees in the eastern US, west, and middle.  Lots of great talent across this country, and some magnificent trees.  I think those on the west coast have the benefit of a more dense bonsai population.  I hope that the density increases across the rest of the country as bonsai continues to spread and grow.

Thank you, Wayne, for taking the time to photograph the display and attempting to start meaningful bonsai conversation.


Take care, all.
Title: Re: Carolina Bonsai Expo 2010 Pictures
Post by: John Dixon on October 28, 2010, 01:25 PM
Pretty easy to see that feelings have been hurt and egos bruised.  That's a shame.

I commend those with the courage to try something new, and the open mind to listen honestly to critiques.  I hope to one day visit the Expo and see the trees and hard work in person.

I have seen trees in the eastern US, west, and middle.  Lots of great talent across this country, and some magnificent trees.  I think those on the west coast have the benefit of a more dense bonsai population.  I hope that the density increases across the rest of the country as bonsai continues to spread and grow.

Thank you, Wayne, for taking the time to photograph the display and attempting to start meaningful bonsai conversation.






Take care, all.


I could not agree with you more about how good bonsai is where you find it. No one has the market cornered. I have been fortunate enough to spend time with many notables in bonsai who are as diverse as this world is. The worst thing one can do is refuse to see what is there in front of them. We all need to remember that.