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Author Topic: New Antique Chinese Pot  (Read 5537 times)
GastroGnome
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« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2011, 07:12 PM »

Very nice pot!  Ebay you say?  Yorozuen?  If so you have no need to worry about fakes, theyre some of the most reputable dealers in japan, and a very nice family too!
There are a lot of fakes coming out of China, but with a good eye it's easy to tell the difference.  There are a bunch of ways makers are patinating pots, and they all leave signs.  CessPool aged pots will have Patina that is uniform, real patina never is.  Washes and artificial coloring agents applied before or after firing leave brush marks, or if sprayed on it will be a negative image of the way patina forms naturally.
http://japanesepots.wordpress.com/
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Elliott
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« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2011, 12:45 AM »

check out Peter Tea's blog. He had a great thread on old pots and how to check for actual patina VS. fake. I wanna figure out how to get calcium build up off but leave the patina. Im gonna try walnut oil. I've been told it disolves the white crusty stuff and leaves the patina.
Anybody got a better way?
'
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Dave Murphy
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« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2011, 06:46 AM »

I've read that burying pots in soil or compost for a period of time, maybe 6-12 months, will safely remove water marks without affecting patina.  I've never tried this, though Undecided.
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2011, 06:52 AM »

Camellia oil will hide it but not forever.  It's sold as a hair product in Japan.  It's also good for shows.  Just use 10x less than you think you need on a rag. Otherwise it will look like you put baby oil on it...  Never tried to remove calcium build-up but I'll ask my sensei tomorrow.
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GastroGnome
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« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2011, 10:19 PM »

Peter Krebs reccomends soaking in Coka Cola for a couple of days and then toothbrushing with clean water.  Says it works like a charm.  Haven't tried the Method yet but there's one or two pots I need to clean this winter.
The best method is prevention!  Rubbing the pots in use down with oil(many varieties will work, even veggie!)
Every week or two will prevent limescale and improve patina!  Win win.  I have pretty hard water and used to have a real problem with buildup, but no longer!  Plus you spend a little More time with trees you may not be focused on at the moment, catch problems earlier and tweak more often.
http://japanesepots.wordpress.com/
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2011, 11:02 PM »

I asked the expert (my teacher) and he recommended submerging the pot for a day or two in rainwater and then lightly scrub with a wire brush.  I think the coke idea sounds a bit safer though  Smiley.
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Judy
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« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2011, 06:51 AM »

Thanks for the info about pot cleaning, I have some trouble with calcium that vinegar has not helped with at all.  Will try the soda solution first.  I'm hesitant to try lime away, this sounds safer.  And good to know that it's preventable!
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Elliott
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« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2011, 12:19 AM »

I guess the trick is getting off the white crusty crap but not messing with any patina developing. Do you guys think that the coca cola or the rain water soak followed by the wire brush will mess with the patina? we can always bribe someone like Kimura to say that the limescale build up is part of the patina and increases the value and beauty. I would suddenly have a million dollar Korean pot collection LOL!!
 Owen, we got plans for you here in Southern Cal. when your done, so learn allot and hurry Wink (that goes for Bjorn also).
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rockm
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« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2011, 02:25 PM »

Bury it in the ground or under pine mulch for the winter...
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Yenling83
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« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2013, 07:25 PM »

I'm going any antique Chinese pot's that I get on this thread.  Here's one I just got from Japan, I have been told it's somewhere around 80-100 years old-not sure if that makes it antique or not.  It has one drip in the glaze.  

W:25cm  x  L:14.5cm   x   H:4.5cm
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Jerry Norbury
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« Reply #25 on: January 31, 2013, 06:25 PM »

Very nice.
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